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Panasonic DVX / DVC Assistant
The 4K DVX200 plus previous Panasonic Pro Line cams: DVX100A, DVC60, DVC30.


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Old April 9th, 2006, 05:21 PM   #1
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AUTO ZOOM FOCUS question

I have recently purchased a Panasonic DVC60 that has a feature that I do not quite understand and the manual does not explain why, just how to do it.

The camera has three USER buttons that you can assign a variety of functions to. The default and from what I have read eleswhere to be a very cool feature is the ZOOM IN/FOCUS function that zooms in full on your subject, focuses and then returns to the original position.

I don't understand the point of this. I understand that by zooming in full, focusing and then zooming back out to your desired position is a method used to get proper framing of a shot by what does this feature accomplish if it returns back to the original position?

It seems to me that it returns you to the same place you began??? Am I missing something (as usual)?

And on the topic of USER assigned buttons for specific functions, what would you choose if you had three to set up the way you wanted? I choose backlight and spotlight for two of them and the other has this zoom thing I don't understand.
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Old April 10th, 2006, 01:28 AM   #2
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that function is if ur wanting to zoom in REAL fast and tight without the hubbub of refocussing. Its much like the Z1 Scene transition, so u can do some nifty camera moves and shot realignment at the touch of a button

surprised they didnt add that to the DVX100b.. or A for that matter.. or HVX...

anyways.. the assignable buttons i allocate are AWB Lock, Backlight (which i hardly need to use) and the other button i use for is slow shutter.. this is for teh DVX mind u. but these are also assignable to the 60

Reason i use AWB, is that for outdoors its much easier to let the camera work out its WB as in good lighting conditions, its bery accurate and i persoanlly have never had a problem with it. I use lock to lock down the WB so as not to shift in colour.. sometimes u DO need to work in between or around 3200k 5600k presets and using a card just gets tedious for every shoot
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Old April 11th, 2006, 03:51 PM   #3
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Hi

I'm new to this forum and I recently bought a DVC30 and I use the zoom-in focus function a lot actually. I'll explain the reason soon but first I will explain another camera, my Panasonic MX500. On that camera, the auto focus is very unpredictable. Sometimes it works OK, but sometimes, without any reason, it looses focus. A work around for me is to set the camera in manual mode with manual focus. To be sure that the focus is on what I would like to record, I zoom in as far as I can, and then adjust focus and finaly zoom out again. It's a lot easier to focus on small objects by zooming in on them as you see details better on an inzoomed object. When I've returned to the zoom level I want, I'm then absolutely shure that the objects are in focus and, as the camcorder is in manual mode, will stay in focus as long as I don't touch the focus ring.

The above procedure is exactly what the DVC30/60 does by using the zoom in focus function, but it does it automatically. Put the camcorder in manual focus mode, chose the zoom level you want, point the camcorder on the object you will record an push the dedicated user button for zoomin and focus. The camcorder then automatically zooms in full, makes an automatic focus, and when you release the button, the zoom returns to where it started with the object 100% in focus, and the focus still in manual mode.

I hope you undestand what I mean. To be short, It's a method to have the camera do an automatic focus adjustment with high precision.

Regards,

/Bo
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Old April 11th, 2006, 04:41 PM   #4
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Thanks...I was looking for it to be explained just like this. I did not realize by zooming in and focusing that it stayed focused on the subject when you zoomed back out.
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Old April 11th, 2006, 04:44 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Jefferson
anyways.. the assignable buttons i allocate are AWB Lock, Backlight (which i hardly need to use) and the other button i use for is slow shutter
If you don't mind could you tell me when you use the slow shutter? Do you use if for creating a desired effect or low light?

Would AE lock be more useful?
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Old April 12th, 2006, 02:22 AM   #6
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Hi again!

As I wrote in my earlier post I haven't had my DVC30 for so long time. It actually arrived las friday so I haven't had so much time to play around with all functions.
The slow shutter can for example be used in very low lit conditions. If there is much motion in the picture there will be jumpy, as the shutter speed is lower than the normal 50fps (60 for NTSC). (Actually there are 25 half pictures twice every second in interlaced mode but there are other forums discussing that).
The slow shutter can, as you say, also be used to create effects. Just play with the cam and see what happends. You can't destroy it using it's normal functions. :-)

The AE lock is a function that prevents the camcorders auto exposure to react on objects passing the scene you are recording. If you for example are filming something across a road, and the camcorder is in automatic exposure, the camcorder will adjust the exposure if a bright object passes the scene, a white car for example. This will adjust the exposure down which makes the scene you are filming darker. If the cam is set to AE Lock, there will be no adjustment if a bright object passes by, keeping the scene in constant exposure.

I hope you understand what I mean :-)

Regards,

/Bo
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Old April 12th, 2006, 03:13 AM   #7
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Thanks again, I appreciate the explaination.
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Old April 12th, 2006, 05:47 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Monte Comeau
If you don't mind could you tell me when you use the slow shutter? Do you use if for creating a desired effect or low light?

Would AE lock be more useful?
low light mainly... during speeches when a light is undesirable or when ive done back to back shoots without much time to recharge my light batteries.
Its pretty much teh same as runnign gain at 12+ but not as noisy

As far as ai know there is no ae loick, only AWB lock, which are 2 different things.
U can run ur exposure in auto, but its been explained what happens if there is passing luminance to the frame, being that your exposuire will fluctuate automatically. to alleviate this, run the exposure in manual.
AWB, is an auto white balance lock, Basically one the system find the "right" colour, jut lock it (usually outdoors as it can be difficult to white balance with a card in overexposed blown out areas)
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Old April 12th, 2006, 08:01 AM   #9
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Hi Peter

There is actually an AE Lock function, at least for the DVC30. It can be dedicated one of the user buttons. You are correct though, that the same functionality can be achieved by setting the camcorder in manual, select shutter speed on the thumb wheel, an pressing the thumb wheel again to set the iris. Then you have locked the exposure.

Regards,

/Bo
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Old April 13th, 2006, 08:22 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo Sundvall
Hi Peter

There is actually an AE Lock function, at least for the DVC30. It can be dedicated one of the user buttons. You are correct though, that the same functionality can be achieved by setting the camcorder in manual, select shutter speed on the thumb wheel, an pressing the thumb wheel again to set the iris. Then you have locked the exposure.

Regards,

/Bo
yeah dude just noticed it on the DVX.. lol dunno why it would be needed when theres an auto/manual iris button already there.. LOL
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