difference between thick and thin at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Panasonic P2HD / AVCCAM / AVCHD / DV Camera Systems > Panasonic DVX / DVC Assistant

Panasonic DVX / DVC Assistant
The 4K DVX200 plus previous Panasonic Pro Line cams: DVX100A, DVC60, DVC30.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old March 26th, 2003, 10:12 AM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Madrid, Spain
Posts: 187
difference between thick and thin

Ok. I have seen the images in the computer, and the difference is clear. When seeing the thin images in a tv, they look bad, but in the computer much better than the thick mode.

Why? WHen do you use thin and thick?
Miguel Lopez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2003, 12:33 PM   #2
Contributor
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 94
The Thick mode is in affect applying vertical blurring to aid with interlaced displays like your TV (akin to adding a 'flicker filter' to high res images.) The Thin mode has more vertical information which can cause interlaced display to flicker/flutter.

If you know that your content is destined for interlaced TV display solely than you could just shoot Thick to save extra steps in post.

But I would suggest shooting Thin and reducing the vertical sharpness to taste in post as your needs dictate. (ie - have the highest quality master which you could then create an adjusted version from for NTSC display.)

HTH,
Clayton
Clayton Farr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2003, 12:46 PM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Madrid, Spain
Posts: 187
But what i do not understand is that thin images look softer, then why is the need of blurring even more the images so the video doesn´t flick?
Miguel Lopez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2003, 01:19 PM   #4
Contributor
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 94
What do you mean by the Thin images looking 'softer'? Is this when displayed on the TV? The primary artifact you should be seeing is the flickering that comes from putting a higher res progressive image on an interlaced display (you can do the same thing by placing a detailed, higher res photo on your timeline.) The reason that the Thin footage looks best on your computer monitor is because it is a progressive display.

Is it the 'fluttering' of the image that is making it look softer on your TV set? (Also, this of course is different than having your play head parked on a 'pulldown' frame that is flickering two different progressive images together.)

Clayton
Clayton Farr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2003, 01:47 PM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Madrid, Spain
Posts: 187
In a computer screen, the Thin images look slighlty softer (blur), with a little more quality, and less grain.

My camera is PAL, so there is no pulldown.
Miguel Lopez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2003, 03:52 PM   #6
Contributor
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 94
I guess I'm not following - what do you mean by 'a little more quality' but also 'slightly softer'? (Also, how are you viewing them on your computer?)

<< My camera is PAL, so there is no pulldown. >>

So is it just laying down 25 progressive images to 50 fields per second for interlaced PAL?
Clayton Farr is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Panasonic P2HD / AVCCAM / AVCHD / DV Camera Systems > Panasonic DVX / DVC Assistant

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:24 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network