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Old June 4th, 2006, 01:08 PM   #1
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HVX menu selection buttons: odd orientation?

I just got my HVX200 and immediately noticed how the orientation of the menu buttons at the top of the camera don't relate to how they operate the menu displayed on the LCD ...

... until you flip the LCD screen so that it lays flat against the camera body, facing outward.

Flip the LCD upside-down, then fold it flat against the camera. The menu buttons now function in the same "sense" as what you see in the menu. "up" and "down", and "left" and "right" now match.

I don't know if this had been posted elsewhere but I thought I'd share this tip as it sure makes life easier for me.
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Old June 4th, 2006, 01:26 PM   #2
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I can see what you mean.
I was used to Canon XL style menu controls when I got my HVX, but I didn't really have much trouble getting used to the menu controls on the camera. Maybe it's just me, but the HVX controls feel more intuitive than the XL...

I think I've actually fumbled the controls more using the remote control than the on-cam buttons.
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Old June 5th, 2006, 09:32 AM   #3
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I don't find the orientation as difficult to deal with...

as much as the location, i.e. being sandwiched-in between the handle and the body, I find the buttons just a tad difficult and "cramped" to operate. I suspect someone with big hands/fingers could find it somewhat annoying to operate the menu and choices. The remote control can come in handy in making menu choices.
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Old June 5th, 2006, 11:06 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Sensui
I just got my HVX200 and immediately noticed how the orientation of the menu buttons at the top of the camera don't relate to how they operate the menu displayed on the LCD ...
Apparently Panasonic tried both "the other way" and the current setup for the buttons while the HVX was in development. For whatever reason, they chose the 'sideways' orientation. I'll admit that I wish it were the other way, but it only took me a day to get used to it.
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Old June 6th, 2006, 01:01 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denis Danatzko
as much as the location, i.e. being sandwiched-in between the handle and the body, I find the buttons just a tad difficult and "cramped" to operate. I suspect someone with big hands/fingers could find it somewhat annoying to operate the menu and choices. The remote control can come in handy in making menu choices.
Same here buddy!
That is probably the only thing I really don't like about this camera. Love the rest of it, hate the location, size, feel of the menu buttons. I'd rather they have done something like... well, nevermind, it is too late now.
See Canon for good button placement.
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Old June 23rd, 2006, 10:47 PM   #6
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One more minor annoyance...

besides the location of the buttons is, IMO, the seemingly narrow beam of the remote control.

Was using the camera tonight to tape parts of a dress rehearsal of a play, and was using the remote to zoom. I don't yet have a VariZoom or other similar control, so I use the remote to avoid the minor movement from pressing the zoom buttons on the body. (I'm also only 5'7", AND prefer to use my left hand, but can summon up occasional bouts of ambidexterity when absolutely necessary).

Despite that, when using the remote in my left hand and standing only about a foot from the camera, I found that I had to be relatively precise (at least more than I expected to be) when pointing the remote at the rear sensor.

Is that old joke true...only left-handed people are in their "right" mind?
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Old June 24th, 2006, 11:13 PM   #7
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Note to newbies:

being relatively new to the field, I have a note that, I hope, will prove helpful to other newbies. (Veterans may laugh, so if you need a chuckle, read on).:

When placing the HVX on the tripod, be sure to have it centered.

I have a Bogen 351MVB2 tripod and Manfrotto 503 head, with quick release plate. (The kind of plate that "slides" within the head). Earlier tonight, I worked 3rd camera on a shoot. I learned well the need to have the center of gravity properly positioned. If it's not "just right", the camera tends to fall either forward or backward. Even though the movement may be, (and was), ever so slight, it could easily be enough to ruin a shot.

I thought I had it adjusted, and levelled properly. The director even came over to check the movement, and said I had the drag adjusted just fine. However, he didn't check for that nearly-infinitesmal drop that I happened to notice too late...about 2 mins. before the performance began.

As a result of making the adjustment, I ended up missing about the first 2 seconds of the narrative intro. Luckily, I was only 3rd camera, and the gig was more for me to get experience than to be used in the final cut. (I also have a hunch that my shots may turn out too dark. I won't know until the director provides feedback).

We're shooting another performance tomorrow night, and I'll be switching positions with where the 2nd camera (an XL1) was tonight, so the director should have plenty to work with, despite my flub.

Moral of the story: the center of gravity can be very important. Do yourself a favor, and FIND IT.

All things considered, I learned a lot.
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