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Old August 27th, 2007, 11:56 PM   #1
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GY HD100 and Lighting

I am going to shot some footage on Wednesday for a museum. I have been using construction lights and would like to do better. I was in a camera shop today and saw some lights that looke nice. there was one called an Omni that looked nice.

Can anyone give me some recommendations on what lighting setup I should buy for interview type scenarios. I know I will need a key, fill and rim light but don't know what is the best to buy and why.

Thanks
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Old August 28th, 2007, 06:32 AM   #2
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Chris, I directed a cine-style lensing in an Ethnology museum a few months back using the GY-HD110 with the wide.angle Fujinon lens.

It was a museum with a darkish ambient light and attractively lit displays - looked like Dedos. We were allowed to switch some off and use our own lighting sources (many museums don't allow this - nothing over 100 lux as a matter).

We brought with us two or three big Kino-Flows, several Par with gels, many of these nifty little under-one-foot fluos and a bunch of reflectors.

Yet with all this, we were under-lit for HD and should really have boosted all the museum's Dedos so we could bring more film lights in as well. It's just very tricky. There never seems to be enough light for HD.

Think of Pola filters as well because of reflections everywhere on display cases and picture frames. If you're using daylight, bring in many reflectors - large styros, some covered with foil, are a good low-budget alternative. If you want to use hardware store lighting, use diffusion screens or gels in front.

If there are any automobiles or other large shiny objects in the museum, it's another ballgame altogether - get advice from a pro photographer.

Hope this helps
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Old August 28th, 2007, 08:11 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Chris Cherrett View Post
[...] Can anyone give me some recommendations on what lighting setup I should buy for interview type scenarios. I know I will need a key, fill and rim light but don't know what is the best to buy and why.
First of all, there is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. Claude's mention of keeping light levels down is a serious concern, always check with the museum first on dos and don'ts, and scout the location prior to the shoot if you can. But here's a high level start.

One short answer: For interviews, usually you want a soft source, as large as practical, as your key light, and then compliment that with Fresnel instruments (which give you control that open face units like the Onmi lack) for back light, specials on background objects, etc. For a broad wash on a background or to cover a large area, an open face like the Omni, with or without diffusion on it, is perfect.

What I typically use: My usual indoor interview set up often includes one or two Kino-Flo DIVAs (I like the fact they are so cool and can be switched easily between Tungsten and Daylight), two Arri 300W Fresnels, and three Arri 150W Fresnels. Often I use a flex-fill reflector clamped to the mic stand as the fill light, saving on units. The DIVAs provide the soft key, Fresnels are used for back lights, specials, sometimes even as a gentle eye light or fill (with diffusion). Unlike "large source" florescents, Fresnels give you light you can control, focus, and cut. Only when I need to wash over a large area do I bother with open face instruments. In a daylight balanced situations (since I"m using CTB or 1/2 CTB color correcting gel on the Fresnels) I might add a couple of 650W Fresnels for more punch through the CTB gel). Flex fills and foam core for reflecting light are important components to any set up.

Long Answer: This issue has been discussed at length in many threads in this forum, take tour around, use the search function, and you'll find lots of illuminating discussion on the topic.
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Old August 29th, 2007, 02:19 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Claude Mangold View Post
It's just very tricky. There never seems to be enough light for HD.
Hope this helps
Have you tried shooting with 1/30th shutter speed?
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Old August 29th, 2007, 04:38 AM   #5
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Thank you all for replying!

I went out and bought a DV Creator Lowel Lighting kit.

It has 3 lights and a few attachments and comes with a nice case. I will let you know how it works out.

Thanks again!
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Old August 29th, 2007, 06:30 AM   #6
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Good luck , Chris!

Scott, I'd be interested in your experiences with various shutter speeds under low-light + action conditions. (My museum scenes are full of stunts - don't ask how I sell this to the curators :-)) and I love night /low light scenes in general.
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Old September 5th, 2007, 05:46 AM   #7
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You can never have enough lights so whatever you buy in the meantime will always come in handy later on.

Years ago I picked up a couple of gorgeous Arris fresnels, a large Lowel Riifa softbox and a couple of other Lowel cheaper lights. This along with the grip kits and assorted accessories has served me well. I even use it for photography from time to time as long as people don't mind the heat it works great :P

I recently got the AB on camera light for the HD100 and the softbox to go with it. It's not bad for on camera lighting I must say.

One thing in a museum is they may not let you use any extra lights as it can damage the artifacts. Might want to check with them first.

Julian
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