incident v.s. spot meter at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Photon Management
Shine an ever-loving light on you.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old March 27th, 2008, 01:21 AM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 335
incident v.s. spot meter

So, this is mostly a film question but I use light meters with video also, but when do you use a spot meter as opposed to an incident meter or can you swap them. I've heard conflicting things about this.
Amos Kim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2008, 02:50 AM   #2
Trustee
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Sherman Oaks, CA
Posts: 1,259
Don't you use an incident meter when you can get in front of the subject and a spot meter when you can't or shouldn't?
Peter Moretti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2008, 02:52 AM   #3
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 335
is that the only difference? So technically, you can do without an incident and use a spot meter or vice versa? I hope that's the case.
Amos Kim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2008, 04:13 PM   #4
Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 4,449
A spot meter is a reflective meter. I used to use one on occasion to check reflectance off something that might be in the shadows too far away to go over and look at with an incident meter.
Bill Pryor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2008, 05:33 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 335
but technically, if it wasn't so far away, you could have used the incident meter to check the shadows and gotten the same results?
Amos Kim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2008, 09:04 PM   #6
Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 4,449
Yep. Assuming you read the meters properly. Any reflective meter is going to lie to you a bit--a dark surface reflects less light, so the reflective meter is going to say to open up more than you probably should, and vice versa for lighter surfaces. For example, if you took a reflective reading off a white card and shot what the meter said, the card would probably be underexposed, while a black card would be overexposed. If you hold an incident meter in front of either cards, it's going to read the same, and you would open up or stop down a little based on the film stock, the camera, the look you want. Both meters are guides to use in determining exposure. You don't always shoot exactly what the meter says.
Bill Pryor is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:03 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network