Kino Flow or Arri? - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Photon Management
Shine an ever-loving light on you.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 29th, 2008, 07:40 PM   #16
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 141
Does anyone know of some good books to learn about different lighting techniques and/or some instructional dvds or internet resources? I can't wait to improve my video.
Spencer Dickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 29th, 2008, 10:50 PM   #17
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
Renting is good. Personally, I don't think you can go wrong buying a couple of 650 watt fresnels though. They won't do everything, and you'll still have to rent, but you'll use them on probably every shoot you ever have, so why not just get 'em and get it over with?
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 05:59 AM   #18
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia (formerly Winnipeg, Manitoba) Canada
Posts: 4,087
Ross Lowell's "Matters of Light and Depth" is the de-facto standard tome for lighting.

http://www.lowel.com/book.html
__________________
Shaun C. Roemich Road Dog Media - Vancouver, BC - Videographer - Webcaster
www.roaddogmedia.ca Blog: http://roaddogmedia.wordpress.com/
Shaun Roemich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 08:04 AM   #19
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 591
for bang for buck.... par 64 cans are hard to beat.

http://www.fullcompass.com/product/286836.html

I have at least 10 of these and they work great for street scenes at night..... very light... focused 500w spot... cheap as a lap dance and take a beating and still work.

Also... I really don't think one could own enough lowel pro lights.... you can put a bunch of these little suckers in a bag and be ready for anything. They are so small that they don't need much of stand to sit on. Lowel also sells a daylight lens for them.

But... if you wanna impress the ladies.... a van full of Mole tweenies, solarspots, and zips and a rack of c-stands is like pull'n up wearing black cowboy boots in a 64 GTO with open headers. Moles will make any city street look like a hollywood budget set.... but they also might attract the permit cops.

Last edited by Christopher Witz; May 30th, 2008 at 09:00 AM.
Christopher Witz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 01:27 PM   #20
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 141
I will pick up a copy of Lowell's book asap.

As for Lowels...I hear nothing but negative things about them. Mostly that they break easily. Is there a difference in the actual light quality with the Lowels over the Arris? Or is it just that the Arris are way better built?
Spencer Dickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 01:55 PM   #21
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
Lowell is okay. Arri and Mole are on a whole other level though, and well worth the extra bucks. As far as breaking, yeah, Lowell products aren't as robust, but unless you abuse your gear you can certainly rely on them. It's decent enough stuff. I like Mole myself. Most small budget productions I've seen use Arri almost exclusively though. It has a reputation (not necessarily true) of being more compact and light than Mole.
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 02:00 PM   #22
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 3,259
If Lowel lights meet your needs they are fine for a single user owner/operator. They get low marks in multi-user environments because they are built very light. Rental companies hate them for this reason. However, many people use Lowels very successfully. They are engineered well.

The Pro is a very fine small fresnel-like light, about 300w. The Rifa is an excellent softbox, there's nothing quite like it on the market (Rifa 55 is the min. size I'd want). The Omni is about half the light an Arrilite is, small open face lights like that are usually used with reflectors or diffusion. It's OK. The Tota is a beast, hard to control, puts out a lot of light in a small package.

Arri is very popular in rental cos. because they are built well, perform well, and are generally accepted by renters. Arrilite is as good as a small open face light gets, likewise the Arri Fresnel 650 is a fine example of a small fresnel.
Seth Bloombaum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 02:12 PM   #23
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
I'll second the comment on the Rifa. If there's one Lowell product I wouldn't mind owning, that'd be it. As annoying as Totas are, they're cheap, and as mentioned throw tons of light for the price and size. They have limited use though -- in an umbrella, or bounced off the ceiling to raise ambient light. It's a good idea to keep a couple around, but don't try and make them do more than they're designed to do.

Hey Spencer, I was rereading your earlier post about wanting a "soft, creepy look," and you know many (most?) horror movies (and typical night scenes), are actually high contrast. There are no softbox-like practicals in the woods!
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 02:22 PM   #24
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
One more thing, about renting. If you plan to shoot on weekends, that's when renting makes the most sense. You typically get a 1-day rental for a pickup Friday and a return early Monday. I know it seems like renting is just throwing money away, but at least you'll learn what you really need and don't. Buying just one piece of expensive gear that turns out to not be as useful as you thought it would can really mess up the budget.
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 02:34 PM   #25
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 141
I see where you are coming from Marco...and that is why I want to find what I call a B&B kit. (bread and butter...not bed and breakfast). A kit that contains most of the absolutely requisite lights for most shooting situations.

Does anyone know if the actual quality of the light the Lowels give is lesser than the Arris, or is the difference only in build quality?
Spencer Dickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 02:47 PM   #26
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
Lighting design trumps build quality. Do Arri and Mole fresnels actually look better than Lowell? I kinda think so, but the big difference (as with everything) is how you use them. What would I consider a basic kit? It's already been mentioned in here. Two 650 watt fresnels, and two 1 K fixtures, either fresnel (big and heavy) or open faced (but must be focusable). Throw in lots of stands, gels, flags (especially flags), sandbags, etc. Remember you can lamp down the lights, so this same kit can convert into two 300 watt fixtures and two 500 watt fixtures, or something in between as needed. Personally, I prefer to buy stuff that will last a lifetime, so it's Arri or Mole for me. One word on the Lowell Pro -- as a sound person it has given me real problems lately. The one on the movie I'm currently wrapping on makes a steady tick, tick, tick sound as it heats up and cools down. Maybe this one has just been abused and if newer ones don't have that problem I apologize for making generalizations. Also, I don't like the scrims on the Omni. The round scrims for the Arri and Mole are just a lot easier to drop in and out of the front of the light. Little things like that can make a big difference on your stress level on a movie set.

Last edited by Marco Leavitt; May 30th, 2008 at 03:33 PM.
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 02:47 PM   #27
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 141
The cheap side of me is tempted by the Lowel kits...but the other side of me is still very interested in the Arri Softbank IV. If I do go with the Arris, what types of reflectors and other peripherals are going to be required? If you could list specific products that would be most fantastic.
Spencer Dickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 02:50 PM   #28
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 141
[QUOTE= you can lamp down the lights, so this same kit can convert into two 300 watt fixtures and two 500 watt fixtures, or something in between as needed.[/QUOTE]

So any Arri light will work in an Arri fixture as long as it is not exceeding the fixture's maximum wattage?
Spencer Dickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 03:02 PM   #29
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
"So any Arri light will work in an Arri fixture as long as it is not exceeding the fixture's maximum wattage?"

No. But you can buy different wattages for a given fixture, up to a point. I know more about Mole than Arri, as that's what I have, and you can only go down to 500 watts with the 1K Baby. One interesting light (my favorite light in fact) is the Mole midget. You can lamp that sucker all way down to 75 watts, or all the way up to 250 watts. Because the lens is so large (the same size as the 650s), you can change the intensity greatly by focusing in and out. I also like that it shares the same barn doors and scrims as my 650s.

But hey, I'm a sound guy! I don't want to come across like I'm an expert at lighting. It's an as needed kind of thing for me.
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2008, 03:09 PM   #30
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
You know, a softbox is a really big outlay. What about renting (that again) kinos for those days when you need them? You could buy the hardlights, minimizing your rental costs. Kinos are great. They don't heat up the place so much, and being way, way thinner are a lot easier to get in position. But man are they expensive. Also, I see most people shooting through large scrim fabrics when they want diffusion anyway. You could add some of those to your kit way more cheaply than buying a full-on softbox. Again, as mentioned, the Rifa is a great little low-cost softbox. It's a breeze to set up too, unlike pretty much anything else out there.
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:18 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network