Stove Plug Converter at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Photon Management
Shine an ever-loving light on you.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old July 14th, 2008, 09:10 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 26
Stove Plug Converter

I've seen on some location sets that the best boy electric plugs a device into the stove plug to convert the 220 volts to 2 separate 110 volt outlets.

A few questions....

What are they called? I think i heard them referred to as Distros????

Can they be bought in stores, or are they rigged up?

Are they safe for long term use?



I ask for several reasons. So I can use a stove plug for power on sets, so my dad can use stove plugs on construction sites, and (if safe) I can just plug one in to convert it for my new gas range.

My dad knows how to rig something together in a pinch, but it is not overly safe for long term. I've also heard about rewiring the 220 volt plug itself but, for the work involved, it would only really be worth it for the range.

Thanks for any help.
Tyler Schlombs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2008, 08:32 AM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Hillsborough, NC, USA
Posts: 968
It's trivial to do - get a 220V plug and two 110V sockets (not receptacles!). Using the appropriately rated cord, connect each 110V hot to one of the 220V hots, wire both 110V neutrals to the 220V neutral and likewise for the grounds.

Note - this assumes you have a 4-terminal 220V outlet (hot-hot-neutral-ground). 220V outlets vary (why the electrical system in the US is so contrived, I'll never know...) - some are just hot-hot-ground which won't work.

FWIW, the two 110V sources will be out-of-phase which could introduce problems with ground loops etc if you mix-and-match equipment across the two.

(I did a similar thing with a 220V outlet for a dryer so that I could run a 110V/15A tablesaw.)
John Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2008, 11:19 AM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 3,259
Illegal in the state of Oregon unless you're a licensed electrician, so I've been told. Local laws vary on this.
Seth Bloombaum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2008, 12:16 PM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 378
Isn't this what transformers are for?
Eric Stemen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2008, 01:20 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Dayton, TN (USA)
Posts: 219
I was in construction and did a lot of electrical work before I quit to move into the video world. It'll work as described above, but be really careful. 220V is not something to mess with. As far as how long-term its safe for: depends on how well and how carefully you do your wiring. If you do everything inside properly grounded and closed junction boxes, then you could let it sit (behind your gas range) for years on end. If you just splice stuff together and wrap it with electrical tape, then I'd want to have it out where I could see it so I could cut the power real quick in case something started smoking. Even if you use wire nuts, things still can come loose. Especially wrapping smaller gauge wire with thicker gauge wire--its hard to get them to join well.

Probably a safer/easier option would be to go to the panel box and simply disconnect one of the hot feeds from the breaker. Then just rewire your outlet from the 220V range plug to a standard 110V socket. Lots safer.
__________________
David Beisner
Media Specialist, Bryan College, Dayton, TN -- www.bryan.edu
David Beisner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2008, 01:55 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Hillsborough, NC, USA
Posts: 968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Stemen View Post
Isn't this what transformers are for?
Not in this case. The 220V supply is really two separate 110V supplies that are out of phase (+110V and -110V which add up to 220V). The equipment connects to two hot wires instead of hot-neutral. (Having two hot wires is rather scary in my mind). Some 220V lines have a neutral which allows you to split the line into two 110V supplies.

(Most of) the rest of the planet does not have this dual voltage - just a single phase ~220V hot-neutral line.
John Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2008, 03:54 PM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 26
thanks for all the advice.

I spoke with an electrician, and they said the same thing for the range, take one of the hots and a neutral to make a 110 or rewire it from the panel or run a new line....

ok... so the range is solved thank you...

but how about a device that just plugs into the stove plug and the other end is 110 outlets or otherwise?

was I dreaming or do these really exist?
Tyler Schlombs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2008, 06:57 PM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 314
Hi Tyler

They probably do exist though you'd likely have to pay a ridiculous amount for them. You could have them made up by an electrician but even then if you want to use them legally, (ie not breaking the CEC, Canadian Electrical Code) you'd have to have them inspected. Also not cheap to do. In BC, one such inspection company is Warnock Hersey. No idea if they're in Ontario or not, but you might ask one of the lighting rental companies such as William F. White who they use.

Also, unless I've read everybody's responses too quickly, no one has said that the important thing in constructing such a device is protection. Range outlets are breakered at 40 amps, while a typical 120 volt outlet is protected at 15 amps. There needs to be either a fuse or breaker with that rating installed into such a device otherwise there is the possibility of overloading the 120 side of the circuit. That is one reason why what you were initially asking for, a y-cord or twofer as they are called, is illegal.

People do use these but the day someone gets hurt/dies or a fire starts, do you want to be the one owns it?
Jase Tanner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2008, 08:03 AM   #9
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 26
Jase,
that has been a concern. thank you.

The gas guys came to run the line yesterday, and they had the answer. I was shocked.

It exists!!!! Home Depot, Rona, many hardware stores..... didn't even think to look

It looks like a little plunger that goes over the plug, safely converts 220V to 110V with a built in 15 Amp fuse to to protect whatever you are plugging in. And the price? $32 at Home Depot. In Rona: $22.

The only downfall is that it is only a single 110 outlet on the other side. I can live with that.
Attached Thumbnails
Stove Plug Converter-poweradapter.jpg   Stove Plug Converter-plug.jpg  

Tyler Schlombs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2008, 08:05 AM   #10
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 26
If I can find it in home depot.... then I guess there are a hundred different ways of making that adapter.
Tyler Schlombs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2008, 08:42 AM   #11
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 314
Tyler

Thats cool. Thanks for telling me. I'm going to pick up one myself.
Jase Tanner is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:28 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network