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Old September 16th, 2003, 09:02 PM   #16
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Kerry Lombard runs barndoor lighting... I recommend using them as a source, but even Kerry can't deliver yet... the first run isn't in yet.

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Old September 17th, 2003, 02:37 AM   #17
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John:

Hardwiring lights may not be "easier" than running off belts, but once the cable is strung, you don't have to think about power. Having a belt die in the middle of the take is just a pain in the ass, and most belts don't have meters on them. I would have done the same thing unless cabling would have presented more problems or slowed us down significantly.
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Old September 17th, 2003, 02:46 AM   #18
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Thanks, Charles. So what is your impression of the Molescent lights compared to the Gyoury?
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Old September 17th, 2003, 02:55 AM   #19
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Well, haven't seen them in person, but as we know Mole's units tend to be the most rugged in the industry. One can assume they will be good units, as are the Kinos and the Gyoury. As I have mentioned earlier, my feeling is that the configuration flexibility of the Gyoury is their strongest selling point. Simply comparing the basic setup of two lamps/wands in a fixture between the manufacturers is a bit like comparing the XL1 with the standard lens to other cameras in its class--it's the choices that both the XL1 and the Gyoury system offer that stand them apart.

I'm going to see if I can get Chris Gyoury to either post on this forum or, better yet, participate to answer questions that seem to be coming up more frequently.
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Old September 18th, 2003, 05:37 AM   #20
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Same crew was out today...this time right below my balcony so I had a bird's eye view of everything (plus, I went down to get a closer look at the lighting and setup).

They needed to light a stretch of tree-lined path and some stairs that lead down from that path to a dock where a boat was waiting for the getaway scene.

Looks like they emptied their light truck for this shot. The two main lights are BIG Arris, both diffused, positioned at about 8 o'clock and 3 o'clock from the camera (and about 30 feet above the camera position up on the path at the top of the stairs). The 3 o'clock Arri is being bounced off a big white board. The 8 o'clock Arri has two theatrical spotlights with yellow filters on either side of it. These are pointed at two different parts of the stairs (one high, one low)...I guess just to break up the white light.

There's a little bridge crossing a canal in the background of the opening of the shot, about 150 feet away, so they put lights on either side of the bridge, down on the dock to illuminate it.

Along the path are five light fixtures...never seen this type before and couldn't see a brand name on them. They have a heavy base and only sit about six inches off the ground. There are pivots on either side that allow them to rotate to be pointed straight up into the trees. The fixtures themselves have two headlight-style lights that are really bright.

Lighting the stairs as the actors descend them and approach the camera are the same Kino-Flos I saw on the bridge. They're using two 4-wand units on either side of the stairs pointed upward. One is raised high, it's pole obscured behind a post at the base of the stairs (since the camera is panning that way to follow them to the stairs).

Finally, pointed at the boat from a boom pole at high angle (directly behind the camera and facing to the left of the camera where the boat is moored) is the huge fluorescent I mentioned, plus about three 2-wand fluorescents that have been strapped to the railing of the dock and dropped over the edge just above the water line to illuminate the water and hull of the boat.

Geez..it'd be fun to have all those lights at your disposal to paint with. Charles, guess that's a normal day to you.
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Old September 18th, 2003, 12:37 PM   #21
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<<< Charles, guess that's a normal day to you. -->>>

Umm...kind of! Doesn't mean it isn't cool, though. Big night exteriors are always an interesting challenge, and I can't say I don't always swivel my head when driving through Hollywood and the huge Musco lights are blasting down Sunset Blvd!

John, might this have been the headlight style units you saw??
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