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Old February 18th, 2007, 06:08 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaron Berman
that type of fixture is meant to be dimmed electrically/electonically anyways.
You mean the HPL in the fixture. What do you mean by "dimmed electrically/electonically"? They don't like variacs or they have been corrected for the vibration, your were refering to, in the filament. Or is this just symantics?

No i can't spell, or use Google
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Old February 18th, 2007, 06:51 PM   #32
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You can dim them with any technology you want, it's just a light bulb. We use hundreds of them in our light plots. I think Jaron's point was that you should use a dimmer down at floor level so you don't have to climb a ladder and put some sort of filter on the light. Realize however that the color temperature will change considerably if you dim the lamp.

Jaron, I think the modern theatrical dimmers are pretty good at reducing "lamp sing". This is a new product that I've been hearing good things about for example: http://www.etcconnect.com/product.overview.asp?ID=20041
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Old February 18th, 2007, 07:16 PM   #33
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Actually the household dimmers aren't that bad now either. I just built a couple of in-line dimmers with parts from a big box hardware store (for under $20 a piece) to control 300w arri fresenels. I have not noticed any lamp noise at all.
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Old February 18th, 2007, 07:30 PM   #34
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i agree - i use router speed controls on all my lights and they work beautifully. But it is a trial and error thing when it comes to lower-end dimmers (like household dimmers or my router speed controls) - some work smoothly and quietly, some don't. The high-end dimmer boards are fantastic, no sing at all in basically any fixture. And yes, HPL lamps are designed to be dimmed, where FRK are not recommended.

I have used lower end boards (both new and old) and they sing like CRAZY on basically any fixture that's not theatrical in nature.

As for variacs - I still have a soft spot for them. When space/weight allows, I love em.
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Old February 18th, 2007, 09:32 PM   #35
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From my experience, creating "sculptural" light with a fog machine is possible but inconvient since the hang time is so short. I rented a hazer for one week, $150 a week, and never went back. Don't even bother with dry ice machines.

Source 4's are great, but I wouldn't say they're the best for shooting on location.
-Alex
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Old February 18th, 2007, 09:58 PM   #36
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People have mentioned a lot of things in this thread, except one important point:

If you want to illuminate a particulate in the air (smoke, water spray, etc), you generally need to backlight it. It doesn't always have to be a true backlight, but the light needs to be more pointing towards the lens than away.
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Old February 18th, 2007, 10:47 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nate Weaver
People have mentioned a lot of things in this thread, except one important point:

If you want to illuminate a particulate in the air (smoke, water spray, etc), you generally need to backlight it.
Hey, I said that! ;-)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyd Ostroff
the key is having an intense backlight against a dark background
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Old February 19th, 2007, 03:38 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Hohenshilt
I also think the light should come from the back. I think this was written about earlyer in this thread, but I wanted to re-empize it.
I think its hear also.

Nate, you explained why more clearly. But you want to light snow from the front.
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