Any examples of Mainstream Movies filmed/shot entirely with natural/ambient lighting? - Page 3 at DVinfo.net

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Old May 12th, 2005, 10:55 AM   #31
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...a generation that's been weened on video and video games and computer screens, is more accepting of an image with video like qualities... its' film that looks funny to them. So in my opinion, the date at which HD will 'replace' film, goes beyond when the technology supports the same resolution and lattitude... it goes to when the kids who want to be DP's now, replace the old guard. How long??? Twenty years maybe?
And for those who have grown up with video games, there are even more aesthetics. More consideration for First Person perspective, for example, playing with time (bullet-time - Matrix). Establishing shots that no one over a few million dollar budget would ever consider. If you look at the shots coming out of E3 you may wonder if it is now going in a different direction where the audience expects every shot to be a wow shot because it is easier to compose in 3D.
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Old May 13th, 2005, 02:21 PM   #32
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Hi All,

Doing a little more research, I found some statements that Director Peter Hyams uses little to no extra lighting on his movies. It went on to say that he's been regularly criticized about that because his movies come off poorly lit. He's directed Capricorn One, 2010, Running Scared, The Presidio, Narrow Margin, Timecop, The Relic, End of Days and has a new movie coming out called A Sound Of Thunder that looks visually interesting (though lots of CGI it seems).

Is anyone else familiar with his work/techniques? I watched Capricorn One (coincidentally it was on Cable last night) and I can see that the lighting is dim compared to most movies and I wasn't sure if it all looked dated because the movie is from 1978, or if that is the case in all his films.

Thoughts?

Brian
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Old May 13th, 2005, 03:39 PM   #33
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2010 uses no extra lighting????
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Old May 13th, 2005, 05:53 PM   #34
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I am stating what I heard second hand. There was a statement posted that he's known for avoiding using any extra lighting and working with natural or existing man made light sources. I can't vouch for it being true or false, though I did notice that the scenes in Capricorn One last night did seem like they could have used very little light enhancements.

If anyone knows if this is true or false, speak up. I'd think any movie like 2010 would have to use extra lighting.. but who knows?

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Old May 13th, 2005, 06:06 PM   #35
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Since half of "2010" was shot on a soundstage or was an FX shot (i.e. in space) that statement is hard to believe. He also made "Outland", another movie set entirely in space.

I don't remember Capricorn One that much but every other one of the movies in that list are major FX-laden and sound-stage shot movies. Maybe selected scenes from these movies used available light but you would think someone who likes shooting like that would stay away from science fiction. :)
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Old May 13th, 2005, 06:19 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Keith Loh
you would think someone who likes shooting like that would stay away from science fiction. :)
You would...
but then again 2010 and Capricorn One are nothing to write home about.
:)

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Old May 13th, 2005, 07:56 PM   #37
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It is surely well unknown by most of us, but the french movie "Un crabe dans la tete", shot by the french canadian André Turpin, was entierly shot in natural lighting (i.e. no additionnal lighting outdoor other than reflexion / only available light indoor on location). This film was considered mainstream for our market, it have been presented in many theaters and won several cinematography awards.
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Old May 13th, 2005, 09:04 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by Jean-Philippe Archibald
It is surely well unknown by most of us, but the french movie "Un crabe dans la tete", shot by the french canadian André Turpin, was entierly shot in natural lighting (i.e. no additionnal lighting outdoor other than reflexion / only available light indoor on location). This film was considered mainstream for our market, it have been presented in many theaters and won several cinematography awards.
André is a great DP there's no denying that. Just goes to prove you can make anything look good when you know what you're doing. Light is light. Everything else is skills (I know, over-simplification, but not far off nonetheless).
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Old May 13th, 2005, 10:54 PM   #39
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Jean-Phillippe,

Is that available on DVD?

Brian
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Old May 13th, 2005, 11:18 PM   #40
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Brian,

Sure, here in Canada, almost all place that sells DVDs have it. In the united states, Amazon.com have it listed
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...s=dvd&n=507846

But it is currently unavalaible. You should be able to find it somewhere.
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Old June 6th, 2005, 11:37 AM   #41
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shooting mainstream movies using available light.

Shooting "mainstream movies" without using traditional lightlng is a lot more common than most realize, usually refered to as "using available light"

Sophia Coppola, in her indiewire.com interview, talks about shooting "Lost in Translation" with a small, handheld camera using only available light. This let her shoot on the Tokyo subway, (not allowed) and in bars and clubs without attracting any undue attention. She decribes it as "documentary style".
When watching this movie, you can see the lighting is nautral. Scenes shot under fluorescent lights have an obvius green cast to them. ("Translation" was shot using a fast *sensitive* film stock, not in HiDef video)

Robert Rodriguez shoots a lot of his works with minimal use of extra lighting.
In his book "Rebel without a Crew" he discusses shooting most of "El Mariachi" in 16mm film, using only available light, and how a very few interior scenes were shot lit with a single photoflood bulb screwed into a nearby light fixture. The result is a gorgeous film with highly saturated colors, something Rodriguez is noted for. He has since made the switch to HiDef video, something he famously advocates. HiDef video requires less extra lighting and captures detail and color (His "Once Upon a Time in Mexico" for example) that is so often lost in modern film.

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Old June 6th, 2005, 11:40 AM   #42
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Thanks Bob..interesting examples. I liked the "look" of lost in translation a lot. I thought the city was as much a character in the movie as the actors and the way it looked was a big part of that.

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