Outdoor Lighting Approach at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Photon Management
Shine an ever-loving light on you.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old March 19th, 2011, 05:47 PM   #1
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Arlington, TX
Posts: 2,230
Outdoor Lighting Approach

Hello,

I have an upcoming shoot that will take place outdoors on a golf course. This is with a single subject but will be a mix of closeup and full body shots. I do not think the course will have much tree cover so we will be out in the sun.

I have been think about diffusing the light on the subject but the mix of shots (especially the full body shots) is making the setup complex. Since we will be moving around and this has a limited budget, HMI's will not be in the picture.

So any ideas about the best way to approach this shoot?

It seems I have these choices:

Use a overhead scrim with reflectors for rim or fill light. I think the shadows will be in the shot on the full body views but the closeups will look great.

Try to keep the sun as a rim light and bounce key on the subject. This looks fine but the club and ball area will be in the shadow cast area. Would reflector bounce make up for that in a smooth looking way?

Shoot with the sun into the subject at 45 deg but limit the time of day for shooting. This gives good emphasis on the club and ball area but basically tears the subject apart with harsh light.

It will probably end up being a mix of all three but I would like your input if you would be so kind to get some different opinions.

Thanks
Tim Polster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2011, 05:26 AM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Madrid, Spain
Posts: 238
Re: Outdoor Lighting Approach

There is no discussion that the best solution is diffusing the light, and yes for FB you need a large diffuser. If you can't use a diffuser for practical reasons, schedule the shoot for an overcast day, if you need to create the illusion of sun bring your own lights.

In direct sun people tend to squint their eyes, and this does not become better with a reflector. Further it is very difficult to give a consistent light with a reflector a little wind and light goes off subject which just looks wrong, they are great for photography, but I wouldn't use them for video. Also, as for diffusers, the reflector needs to be larger than the subject so you problem with large diffusers becomes a problem with large reflectors.

BR, Erik
Erik Norgaard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2011, 10:31 AM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Arlington, TX
Posts: 2,230
Re: Outdoor Lighting Approach

Thanks for your reply. After some research I can rent a joker 400/200 kit for $275. So I might go this route if I can find a silent portable generator. Any ideas on a generator? The rental place has a Honda EU 2000 generator which is rated for 13 amps which seems like enough. Any experience with its noise output?
Tim Polster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 03:59 AM   #4
Trustee
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 1,570
Re: Outdoor Lighting Approach

The 200W Joker Bug can be run from batteries, two or four brick batteries to be exact.
Bob Grant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 10:47 AM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 312
Re: Outdoor Lighting Approach

As you could for the 400 watt with the use of an inverter and sufficient battery power, the operative word being "sufficient"

As for the Honda, it'll do the job and I doubt you'll find a quieter genny out there but that doesn't mean you won't hear it. Distance of course helps, bearing in mind the limits that voltage drop will place on you, but really a generator needs to be behind something big like a building to block its sound and then have some distance away. You're not going to find that on a golf course.

All of this, not to mention that as punchy as the jokers are for their wattage, I don't see them doing anything on your full body shots.
Jase Tanner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 11:20 AM   #6
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Arlington, TX
Posts: 2,230
Re: Outdoor Lighting Approach

Thanks for your replies. I have been thinking a lot about this shoot. Do I go all reflector or lights along with reflectors?

I have used both in the past and the lights were a lot easier to manage. The rental place also has a Joker 800 kit. I wonder if the 800 (given the EU 2000i can run it) in a softbox might be a good alternative? If I can get the light up so the angle might help the full body shots.

With shadows I do not think an overhead diffuser is an option for anything but a tight-ish only shot. So shooting at the first and last part of the day along with lights and a reflector to fill in seems like my best shot. Sound like I am on the right track?

I am trying to not be out a wrestle with the open mid-day sun.
Tim Polster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 9th, 2011, 10:38 AM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Madrid, Spain
Posts: 238
Re: Outdoor Lighting Approach

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Polster View Post
Thanks for your replies. I have been thinking a lot about this shoot. Do I go all reflector or lights along with reflectors?

I have used both in the past and the lights were a lot easier to manage. The rental place also has a Joker 800 kit. I wonder if the 800 (given the EU 2000i can run it) in a softbox might be a good alternative? If I can get the light up so the angle might help the full body shots.

With shadows I do not think an overhead diffuser is an option for anything but a tight-ish only shot. So shooting at the first and last part of the day along with lights and a reflector to fill in seems like my best shot. Sound like I am on the right track?

I am trying to not be out a wrestle with the open mid-day sun.
Sorry, I forgot to keep up with this thread, I don't know if you've done the shoot?

Anyway, if you're gonna shot in bright midday sun your problem is not lack of light but excess of it. The sun causes harsh shadows which you can dampen using reflector or portable lights. But, your subject will not be comfortable in the bright lights. In stead, if you use a diffuser you both reduce the shadows and you will have a much more relaxed subject.

Just as for reflectors, diffusers need to be larger than the subject. Regardless of the hazle I think it's a better option than portable lights that take just as much time to rig and eventually run out of juice.

BR, Erik
Erik Norgaard is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:44 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network