Led diy? - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Photon Management
Shine an ever-loving light on you.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old January 7th, 2017, 11:08 AM   #16
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NY, NY USA
Posts: 422
Re: Led diy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donald McPherson View Post
Kathy might be a bit big but I have mine connected to a 12v battery. Similar to this. Lucas 12V 7AH AGM/GEL Rechargeable Battery FLYMO CT250X STRIMMER BATTERY | eBay
Donald, sorry to sidetrack but what did you use for the backing for your lights? Faux leather?
Kathy Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 7th, 2017, 11:28 AM   #17
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New Jersey USA
Posts: 504
Re: Led diy?

Those battery plates are used to mount V lock professional ENG type 14.4 VDC batteries to power up various devices like Pro video cameras as well as pro lighting equipment. You will find that the batteries are usually the lithium ion ones that are very expensive and need dedicated chargers for them. Do not be surprised if one battery and charger cost well over $600 dollars, and that is for the generic brands. An Anton Bauer charger alone is minimum $700 and their cheapest battery is around $500. Unless, of course money is no object, check out B & H photo and see. The lead acid battery types are much more cost effective and giving the same amp hour run time. Like a 12 volt DC lead acid with 7 amp draw is effectively a 84 watt hour battery. That 84 watt hour can power a 20 watt consumption light for about 4 hours give or take a few minutes, Also to remember that if the led driver needs a minimum voltage of say 10 volts to operate properly, then a battery that runs down in time to less that 10 volts will cause the led driver to be out of it;s regulation zone and will shut down or flicker the led. No harm there but that's when a higher capacity battery comes in handy or using extra fresh batteries. Batteries are always rated in either watts hour or watts per hour and also volts and amperage ( current rating ). A battery that just says 9 volts is meaningless. Lead acid types are the easiest and cheapest to run and the chargers are a dime a dozen. Their drawbacks are weight and longevity. Lithium ion ones are light, small size but need a special charger made for them. NIMH ones are good too fitting in between the lead types and Li-ions but are less expensive than the Li-ions. Then we had, and thankfully disappeared Nickel Cadmiums. For a light that you have, I would go for a Li-ion type but with the Sony L series like the NPF-969 or 970. There are rated for around 60 watt hours and if your light draws 30 watts then they can power for around 2 hours. Dimming led just a wee bit can save a lot of battery juice.
Arthur Gannis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 7th, 2017, 11:37 AM   #18
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Aberdeen Scotland
Posts: 545
Re: Led diy?

Yes Faux leather. Looked god after I finished but the edges started to lift in the led strips after rolling, unrolling a few times. I also wired mine for the 12v. Live and learn. Maybe should just buy the real thing as it could work out cheaper after a few trial and errors. But it's still fun to try.
Donald McPherson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 7th, 2017, 12:22 PM   #19
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NY, NY USA
Posts: 422
Re: Led diy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur Gannis View Post
Those battery plates are used to mount V lock professional ENG type 14.4 VDC batteries to power up various devices like Pro video cameras as well as pro lighting equipment. You will find that the batteries are usually the lithium ion ones that are very expensive and need dedicated chargers for them. Do not be surprised if one battery and charger cost well over $600 dollars, and that is for the generic brands. An Anton Bauer charger alone is minimum $700 and their cheapest battery is around $500. Unless, of course money is no object, check out B & H photo and see. The lead acid battery types are much more cost effective and giving the same amp hour run time. Like a 12 volt DC lead acid with 7 amp draw is effectively a 84 watt hour battery. That 84 watt hour can power a 20 watt consumption light for about 4 hours give or take a few minutes, Also to remember that if the led driver needs a minimum voltage of say 10 volts to operate properly, then a battery that runs down in time to less that 10 volts will cause the led driver to be out of it;s regulation zone and will shut down or flicker the led. No harm there but that's when a higher capacity battery comes in handy or using extra fresh batteries. Batteries are always rated in either watts hour or watts per hour and also volts and amperage ( current rating ). A battery that just says 9 volts is meaningless. Lead acid types are the easiest and cheapest to run and the chargers are a dime a dozen. Their drawbacks are weight and longevity. Lithium ion ones are light, small size but need a special charger made for them. NIMH ones are good too fitting in between the lead types and Li-ions but are less expensive than the Li-ions. Then we had, and thankfully disappeared Nickel Cadmiums. For a light that you have, I would go for a Li-ion type but with the Sony L series like the NPF-969 or 970. There are rated for around 60 watt hours and if your light draws 30 watts then they can power for around 2 hours. Dimming led just a wee bit can save a lot of battery juice.
How about this instead? https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...tery_Pack.html
Kathy Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 7th, 2017, 12:25 PM   #20
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NY, NY USA
Posts: 422
Re: Led diy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donald McPherson View Post
Yes Faux leather. Looked god after I finished but the edges started to lift in the led strips after rolling, unrolling a few times. I also wired mine for the 12v. Live and learn. Maybe should just buy the real thing as it could work out cheaper after a few trial and errors. But it's still fun to try.
But the real thing is so expensive!
I wonder if you could stitch the edges instead of glueing them.
Did you get faux leather online. I just looked online and it's hard to figure out how thick/thin the material is.
Kathy Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 7th, 2017, 04:21 PM   #21
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New Jersey USA
Posts: 504
Re: Led diy?

That will work only if your light project needs that particular 7.4 VDC voltage. It is same with the Sony L series. It's the voltage that matters. If your led light requires 12 volts or more then those 7.4 volt batteries simply won't power it up. Again you need to look up the led strip specifications. In my experience they always seem to want 12 volts DC. There are many batteries out there that can do 12 volts DC as the lead acid brick ones. The led driver control box with the dimmer as in the video probably has an input DC voltage range like 12 to 18 volts or something like "operating input DC voltage 9-12 VDC" You need to know for sure before going battery hunting. That input voltage is very important to know. Don.t take chances or else you will blow the circuitry. Like I said, led are very finicky about their feed voltage. You need the proper led driver and voltage for them to operate properly.
Arthur Gannis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2017, 10:49 AM   #22
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NY, NY USA
Posts: 422
Re: Led diy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donald McPherson View Post
Yes Faux leather. Looked god after I finished but the edges started to lift in the led strips after rolling, unrolling a few times. I also wired mine for the 12v. Live and learn. Maybe should just buy the real thing as it could work out cheaper after a few trial and errors. But it's still fun to try.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur Gannis View Post
That will work only if your light project needs that particular 7.4 VDC voltage. It is same with the Sony L series. It's the voltage that matters. If your led light requires 12 volts or more then those 7.4 volt batteries simply won't power it up. Again you need to look up the led strip specifications. In my experience they always seem to want 12 volts DC. There are many batteries out there that can do 12 volts DC as the lead acid brick ones. The led driver control box with the dimmer as in the video probably has an input DC voltage range like 12 to 18 volts or something like "operating input DC voltage 9-12 VDC" You need to know for sure before going battery hunting. That input voltage is very important to know. Don.t take chances or else you will blow the circuitry. Like I said, led are very finicky about their feed voltage. You need the proper led driver and voltage for them to operate properly.
Thank you. Yes, I need 12v.
Kathy Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2017, 11:05 AM   #23
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NY, NY USA
Posts: 422
Re: Led diy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donald McPherson View Post
Yes Faux leather. Looked god after I finished but the edges started to lift in the led strips after rolling, unrolling a few times. I also wired mine for the 12v. Live and learn. Maybe should just buy the real thing as it could work out cheaper after a few trial and errors. But it's still fun to try.
Donald, do you think corner protectors like this would help?
Attached Thumbnails
Led diy?-corners.png  
Kathy Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2017, 01:27 PM   #24
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Aberdeen Scotland
Posts: 545
Re: Led diy?

Yes would help with the corners. But I would still worry about the edges of the individual led strips peeling away.
Donald McPherson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2017, 04:04 PM   #25
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NY, NY USA
Posts: 422
Re: Led diy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donald McPherson View Post
Yes Faux leather. Looked god after I finished but the edges started to lift in the led strips after rolling, unrolling a few times. I also wired mine for the 12v. Live and learn. Maybe should just buy the real thing as it could work out cheaper after a few trial and errors. But it's still fun to try.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donald McPherson View Post
Yes would help with the corners. But I would still worry about the edges of the individual led strips peeling away.
Would stitching help instead of glueing?
Kathy Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2017, 04:11 AM   #26
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NY, NY USA
Posts: 422
Re: Led diy?

Where do you guys get a power socket for these? Also can you use 20v AC adapter instead of 19V?
Kathy Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2017, 10:17 AM   #27
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New Jersey USA
Posts: 504
Re: Led diy?

Hi Kathy, Did you get that kit with the electronic boards ( drivers) and the dimming switches included as shown in the video ? If not, what are you using as the circuit to drive the led ? You will find all the sockets needed and accessories including power supplies here. This is where I purchase all my stuff .
All Electronics | Electronic and Electro-Mechanical Parts and Supplies at Discount Prices

The socket you are referring to is probably this one, it is commonly available in 2 millimetre sizes as 2.1 mm male and 2.5mm male. see here if it's 2.5 mm : 2.5mm DC Power | All Electronics Corp.

and here if your supply fitting is 2.1 mm : 2.1mm DC Power | All Electronics Corp.

You can also search for DC power connector.

I highly doubt that you can use AC current as input to any leds or led driver. They are only designed to accept DC (direct current). Perhaps you mean an AC 110 volt to DC 20 volt adapter ???

Where did you see you needed that 19 or 20 volt ???
Arthur Gannis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2017, 06:04 AM   #28
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NY, NY USA
Posts: 422
Re: Led diy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur Gannis View Post
Did you get that kit with the electronic boards ( drivers) and the dimming switches included as shown in the video ? If not, what are you using as the circuit to drive the led ? You will find all the sockets needed and accessories including power supplies here
Arthur,
I'm not sure what kit you are referring to but I did get the dimming switches shown in the video.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur Gannis View Post
Where did you see you needed that 19 or 20 volt ???
In the video @ min 12:35

I'm attaching images of the AC adapter that I was planning to use. Will this work? Also, I'm not sure the socket I need is 2.5mm. I think it's bigger. It looks like lenovo is using some nonstandard size.
Attached Thumbnails
Led diy?-img_9060.jpg   Led diy?-img_9062.jpg  

Kathy Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2017, 07:23 AM   #29
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Aberdeen Scotland
Posts: 545
Re: Led diy?

You can easily find male and female connectors on eBay that will work. If you buy a few you could use them on other projects.
Donald McPherson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2017, 08:23 AM   #30
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NY, NY USA
Posts: 422
Re: Led diy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donald McPherson View Post
You can easily find male and female connectors on eBay that will work. If you buy a few you could use them on other projects.
Thank you, I'll look
Kathy Smith is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:38 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network