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Old September 26th, 2006, 06:49 PM   #1
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Anyone use Dedoflex?

I've been using a 500W Lowel Rifa as part of a good cheap rental kit, but on buying my own kit, I had to face the fact that I wanted a softie that didn't make my interviewees sweat - but I can't afford kinoflos.

Have seen something labelled as a Dedoflex - has an odd Dedo thing in the middle (same bulb as a standard Dedo) with a sort of Chimera box.

It's slightly more faff to assemble and pack, but is dimmable and way cooler than the equivalent Rifa. All for about the same price.

Sounds good, but it doesn't seem to exist according to google. Anyone tried them? Can you get egg-crates? How do they withstand use on the road? Rifas are legendary, but I guess the Dedoflex is very new?
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Old September 26th, 2006, 09:43 PM   #2
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Hi:

Have you considered building your own Kinos? I am building the equivalent of a Diva 400 for well under $150.00. It won't look as nice as a Diva but the light quality and output should be the same.

http://ahsupply.com/36-55w.htm

All you have to do is be able to wire them up and figure out a mounting system. I will be posting my solution with pictures as soon as my work relents and I have a day or two to put them together.

Best,

Dan
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Old September 27th, 2006, 12:45 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Brockett
It won't look as nice as a Diva but the light quality and output should be the same.
There's an appeal of using aquarium lighting with some tin foil and polystyrene to get a Kinoflow, and quite frankly, Kinos have that home grown charm too. Hey, whatever makes the person in front of the camera look nice and feel comfortable is good for me!

The back end we can worry about. It seems that it's the tubes that make the difference - no dips in the wavelength, no flickering, consistent colour temperature.

I've filmed in a Tractor Shed lit by the cheapest flourescents the local council could find (talent held a big white reflector at chest height during the interview, bless him) and got shockingly good results. Ditto another interview with the boss (no reflector, but nice backlight from the office throught the open door behind him).

So I don't think the tubes are a problem - just the enclosure and all the bits. Have just bought a stand/boom combination to get a broad light OVER something - suddenly the Kino ultra-light 'plastic cardboard' makes sense. Where does the balast go? How to make the head as light as possible?
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Old September 28th, 2006, 11:25 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Matt Daviss
There's an appeal of using aquarium lighting with some tin foil and polystyrene to get a Kinoflow, and quite frankly, Kinos have that home grown charm too. Hey, whatever makes the person in front of the camera look nice and feel comfortable is good for me!

The back end we can worry about. It seems that it's the tubes that make the difference - no dips in the wavelength, no flickering, consistent colour temperature.

I've filmed in a Tractor Shed lit by the cheapest flourescents the local council could find (talent held a big white reflector at chest height during the interview, bless him) and got shockingly good results. Ditto another interview with the boss (no reflector, but nice backlight from the office throught the open door behind him).

So I don't think the tubes are a problem - just the enclosure and all the bits. Have just bought a stand/boom combination to get a broad light OVER something - suddenly the Kino ultra-light 'plastic cardboard' makes sense. Where does the balast go? How to make the head as light as possible?

That's what seems so appealing about using these homemade Kinos, they use the exact same tubes (I am buying the Kino tubes for both 3200k and 5500k) as the Divas and they have a ballast that actually runs at a higher frequency than the Kinos. The reflector has a more substantial reflectivity quotient than the Divas so they should be a bit more efficient. The challenge will be eggcrates and barndoors as well as the mounting system. I have some ideas about those as well.

Like you, I experienced a shoot outdoors at a lake last year where one of those fluorescent camping lights were illuminating the faces of my family and some friends. The footage, shot at dusk, looks amazingly nice and got the gears in my head turning toward obtaining some fluorescents. I like the Kino product, I just feel that it is massivly overpriced for what it is.

That ballast will be mounted on the rear of a wood (birch 1/2" plywood) mounting plate I am making, I think it will work out fine. It won't look as slick as a Kino or won't travel as well but the end result should be excellent for about 1/6th the cost total.

Best,

Dan
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Old October 4th, 2006, 01:17 PM   #5
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The Dedolight guys tend to use the term Dedoflex to cover any of their fabric products (reflectors, softboxes, even accessories), so it's a little hard to craft a reply. The Dedolight soft box heads are very nice, and they have a variety of them from daylight to tungsten in a variety of sizes. The smallest ones are very compact and make great soft-box heads for travel. Like all of Dedo's stuff, they are very well made. Plus, their heads have a built-in variable speed ring. They'd like you to use their softboxes, but the heads work with Chimeras as well.
You can find all of the details on the website (dedolight.com), but you'll probably have to download the PDF catalog since the site itself isn't all that useful (it's been under revision for a long time now).
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Old October 8th, 2006, 11:38 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Ralph Keyser
You can find all of the details on the website (dedolight.com), but you'll probably have to download the PDF catalog since the site itself isn't all that useful (it's been under revision for a long time now).
No kidding. I'd downloaded the PDF and even got a printed brochure, but there were no details of the unit I'd seen.

However, I've since stumped up the cash and now own one (instead of the Lowel Rifa - only marginally cheaper). It does exactly what it says on the tin: it's like a Rifa only more so, and dimmable. Okay so it takes 90 seconds more to unpack, but the dimmable nature, the undiffused punch and the 3400k 'bright' mode tipped the balance, and the lack of heat (over the 500 watt Rifa) won the day.

Apparently it's only been out a few months, hence the lack of mention on the web.
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Old October 25th, 2006, 04:36 PM   #7
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Matt,

What was the model number of the soft light you got? Was it DLH1x150? If it was, do you find it bright enough in a soft box, being 150W?

I have their DLH4 lights that work beautifully.

Thanks a lot,
Vladimir
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Old October 31st, 2006, 08:02 PM   #8
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Dedoflex is just another name for softbox...

I've also been eyeballing the 150W soft light heads from Dedolight. In addition to the single 150W head that's already been mentioned, they have a new one that holds 4 individual 150W lamps! (Model # DLH4X150S) The head connects to a 4-channel ballast (Model # DT4X150U ) with individual on-off control via dimmers! This combination of features allows the DP to adjust the brightness level in precise one stop increments (like a Kino Flo) without affecting the color temperature or changing lamps. Using the dimmers, you can also adjust the color temperature from from 0 up to 3400 degrees Kelvin! It's a wonderful little light. A complete setup goes for around $1400, though.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...ughType=search
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Old October 31st, 2006, 10:23 PM   #9
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But...

Hi Brian:

Nice light, that new Dedoflex. But for the money, I would much rather buy a Barger Baglight. Similar concept, a multi-bulb fixture that can ramp it's power up and down without changing color temp but with the Barger, you would get almost 4,000 watts of output that can be ran off of multiple AC outlets in a normal home/room without a generator.

Sure, the Dedoflex comes with a softbox and you would have to provide your own for the Barger but for the money, 600 watts is very small output and an by locating the Dedo instruments inside a softbox, IMHO, you are losing all of the advantages of using a Dedo in the first place. You can stick any old light in a softbox and it works well, why pay $1,400.00 for one?

All the best,

Dan
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Old October 31st, 2006, 11:29 PM   #10
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I recently bought a set of fluorescents from Britek. They are square fixtures that accept four compact florescent bulbs. The fixture lets you switch each bulb individually. The kit I bought included soft boxes and stands. The build quality is fairly low and light duty, but if you donít mind babying your gear it works pretty well. I paid 370 for two lights, soft boxes, and stands but I just checked their site and its now 310.
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Old November 1st, 2006, 09:33 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Brockett
You can stick any old light in a softbox and it works well, why pay $1,400.00 for one?
I think equipment purchases are a very personal decision. As for me, well, I don't have one. But, I can see the advantages:

1. It would standardize the type of light bulbs I have in my interview kit (ALL 150W/24V)
2. It would save space in my light kit by getting rid of the Photoflex Starlite I currently use and all the space-hogging (6" to 12" long!) lamps I have in the case (250W, 500W, 1000W)!
3. I could get rid of the 1K Leviton dimmer I have in the case.

Basically... It would save a TON of space in my light kit! Space that could be more effectively used for another Dedolight DLHM4-300!

I think the Barger Baglight is another terrific light. Barger is well suited for larger studio shoots, but I think the Dedo is more useful for the types of shoots I do. And, that's why I might be able to justify buying it. I'm currently saving up for an 800W Joker Bug, so it might have to wait a couple of months.

BTW, a 150W/24V lamp is about 40% brighter than a 150W/120V lamp... If you consider that level of efficiency, the 600W Dedolight is roughly as bright as a 1K open face in a softbox.
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Old November 1st, 2006, 09:55 PM   #12
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Hi Brian:

But why pay $1,400.00 for something that essentially will give you the same result on screen that you can get with something that costs $500.00 to $600.00?

Dedos, I can see, they are kick ass little lights, I have rented them and love them but by sticking a cluster of them into a cheap softbox, I just don't get why someone would do that? Can you still use the individual dedos separately? If so, then it begins to make a little more sense, they are pulling double duty.

Enlighten me.

Dan
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Old November 2nd, 2006, 02:53 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Brockett
But why pay $1,400.00 for something that essentially will give you the same result on screen that you can get with something that costs $500.00 to $600.00?
I'm independently wealthy.

:-)
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Old November 2nd, 2006, 09:11 AM   #14
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Oh, well, that explains everything. ;-)

I am very intrigued by the Dedos in general, I like them but I am not sure of they would be worth it for me and my shooting style. I already own 22 video lights, have a small travel kit as well as a 3 ton grip and lighting package. I only have fluorescents and tungsten instruments though, no HMIs. I used to have a Joker 1200 watt PAR that I loved but rarely used so I sold it.

While the Dedos are great lights, they are rather expensive. I would love to have two or three for doing tabletop shoots, which I have been doing a lot of lately through. Do they ever show up used on Ebay?

Best,

Dan
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Old November 3rd, 2006, 02:42 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Brockett
...but by sticking a cluster of them into a cheap softbox, I just don't get why someone would do that? Can you still use the individual dedos separately?
Not quite the point. The fourway is just four little glass boxes using Dedo bulbs with a bit of clever reflection.

Boring but important - they use the same bulbs as dedolights, all low voltage, and they're cheap and last for ever and can be banged about a bit.

In film school I was brought up on Red Heads and Blondes, where we were accountable for blown bubbles, and stories of fried household electrics will remain a work of fiction. Okay, so maybe I got toasted (but not as much as a fellow student's bedsit), but anything that is low temp, low voltage, low running cost, low maintenance and high quality tends to... oh, I dunno, call me old fashioned, but... tends to make me feel good.

But not quite as good as the talent under the lamps and the property owner looking at the electric meter (not the fuse box, as that hasn't happend).
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