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Old April 9th, 2003, 05:27 PM   #1
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interview lighting`

does anyone know the best method of lighting for filming interviews? what in terms of lighting equipment would i need?

thanks in advanced

P.S. the interviews will be done outside
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Old April 9th, 2003, 06:21 PM   #2
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Adam, there is a book by John Jackman (Moderator of the lighting forum on dv.com) which might help you. Go here for a review.

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthrea...t=john+jackman

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Old April 12th, 2003, 04:31 PM   #3
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There are lots of different ways to light things like interviews, but a simple, standard sort of way is to key from one side, fill from the other and use a backlight if possible. You can key with a diffused source and fill with bounce from white foamcore and then backlight, and you get by with only two lights, if you want.
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Old April 12th, 2003, 06:23 PM   #4
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Adam,

Check out these articles by Walter Graff. Just click "Articles" in the menu, then scroll down and start selecting. Lots of good info.
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Old April 12th, 2003, 09:27 PM   #5
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You could always go the route of the news interviewers- just a small light on top of the camera. I have seen several small models similar to these in Circuit City for about $37.

Of course the proper way would be to use the 3 light method that Bill mentioned. A key light, a fill light, and a back light or hair light as it is also called. Just keep the lights soft, so as not to cause squinting- or blindness in extreme cases :) I would use umbrella reflectors to soften the light, and broaden it a bit.
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Old April 12th, 2003, 10:08 PM   #6
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Adam,
Working outside in the bright Nevada sun, your challenge will be to control the harsh contrast. With your subject in the sunlight you'll probably want to soften the sun by using a silk (a fine screen mounted on some type of frame) and probably use one reflector to bounce some light onto the subject's shady side for fill.
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Old April 14th, 2003, 12:35 PM   #7
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thanks for all the input...

i figured the 3 point lighting would be the best way to go..
i shot one already and turned out great...though it was inside..

for outside im might try to screen out the light like Ken said..
or maybe wait till late afternoon to get get a softer natural light..
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Old April 14th, 2003, 11:50 PM   #8
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I saw a very nice demonstration of four point ligting with three point lighting and an added slash of CTB (color temperature blue) filter over a separate light shining on the wall behind the character...it added a very nice feeling of depth to the image. I think they also used a blur effect in post on the image to make it look kind of dreamy.

The demo was for a commercial with ony one character but variations of this could be used in an interview and really add to the value of the image.
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Old April 15th, 2003, 12:06 AM   #9
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Robert,
Indeed, the blue background is a good psychochromic trick to play, particularly when you don't have much physical depth at hand. It turns out that the brain interprets blue backgrounds with warmer tones in the foreground as being deeper. Warm colors proceed, cool colors recede.
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