Interviewing chairs at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Photon Management
Shine an ever-loving light on you.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old March 16th, 2007, 04:32 PM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 505
Interviewing chairs

Sorry if this has been covered before, but is there a particular kind of chair that's favored for interviewees? I've just bought in a couple of Director's chairs for this purpose.
Greg Quinn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2007, 04:42 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Akron, Ohio
Posts: 496
It really depends on a lot of things. Generally I prefer a professional posing stool used for still photography. See link below. A directors chair should work fine for most apps though.

http://www.owens-originals.com/Brand...g%20stool.html
John DeLuca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2007, 05:00 PM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 2,222
Thanks for the posing stool link. Which doi you use ? I'm concerned about creaking from heavier models, such as 260-300 lbs.

Also, is it better to avoid the foot rest to reduce foot fiddling choices ?
Gints Klimanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2007, 05:17 PM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Akron, Ohio
Posts: 496
Hmm, I see your point with heavier models. The 'heavy duty photogenic' model without the foot rest is probably the strongest. The ones I have are actually very old (from the 80's), but very strong. Never had a problem with creaking, but I would call the company just incase.
John DeLuca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2007, 06:27 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gints Klimanis View Post
I'm concerned about creaking from heavier models, such as 260-300 lbs.
The company that sold me the director's chairs said they've tested them to 800 pounds stress. I would have though having a back to the seat would be good since it helps the stabilize the interviewee's location, no?
Greg Quinn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2007, 06:42 PM   #6
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 2,222
You're right about stabilizing the interviewer's position. I'm also interested in a backless chair to remove the distraction of the chair backing in upper body shots.
Gints Klimanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2007, 06:58 PM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Akron, Ohio
Posts: 496
I agree, a stool will isolate the subject better during an interview.

Also, a chair or stool creaking under weight is different than completely failing. It’s important to note that anyone in the 250-300 pound range could vary well creak most stools or chairs. Maybe you could just instruct the talent to stay as still as possible during the interview.
John DeLuca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2007, 07:56 PM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 423
Wd-40?

WD-40? I thought that was what you used to eliminate creaking...
__________________
"... the drama is on your doorstep..." - John Grierson
www.grvideo.net
Kevin Randolph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17th, 2007, 02:13 AM   #9
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wiltshire, UK
Posts: 192
For what it's worth, (and it may seem obvious) but avoid swivel chairs!! Office have loads of them and most people are comfortable in them, but don't realise how much they move about - the camera of course does!!!

Sorry if this is a bit obvious!!
Graham Risdon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17th, 2007, 07:16 AM   #10
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Tampa-Orlando, FL
Posts: 124
The simplest of the solutions is usually the best. You can’t beat a folding chair from Walmart, even the best one will only cost you less than 30 bucks, the back of these chairs is narrow enough that will be hidden by the subject. Director chairs are good and comfortable but the fabric seat and back is not rigid enough and most of the times the subject will sink or slouch down. They are very good in situation where you have more than one person on camera in a talk-show style conversation where the viewer’s attention is not concentrated on one single person.

A proper chair will dictate the body upper posture and make a world of difference particularly on challenging subjects.

For Several reasons I would strongly discourage the use of photographic stools for video interviews. Those are good for photography where you take individual poses and you need something that moves quickly and without much effort. Interviews take long continuous time, you need the subject to be comfortable and not to move even slightly, particularly if you are on a tight shot. A back support will hold the subject in place, also without a back support the subject after a few minutes will become uncomfortable and start slouching.

Nino

www.EFPlighting.com
Nino Giannotti is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:55 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network