Newbie book re: DV for broadcast? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > The Archives > Read About It

Read About It
Some old-fashioned book-learnin' will do you some good.


 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 22nd, 2003, 05:57 PM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 621
Newbie book re: DV for broadcast?

I am looking for a book that might best be defined as "One Man Desktop Digital Video for Television"

I have been doing editing, titles, and animation for local cable commercials for a while now and recently invested in a Panasonic DVC80 so I could get involved in the shooting side of things.

Right now I can fill a niche -- ads done quick and cheap for small businesses who want to get on TV but have no budget (they are often surprised that, unlike print and radio ads, they have to pay for television ad production).

This means I am a one man crew (on top of being newbie to DV shooting). Are there any resources that will help teach me how to get the best quality out of my limited resources? This includes shooting, using natual/existing light, post-production work (AE and Premiere) that will give a more "television" look.

I look at shows like "Trading Spaces" -- obviously, these are shot by professionals with much nicer cameras, but ultimately they seem to use more natural lighting, few tripods, etc -- that is, some of the same conditions I deal with. But they still get great looking footage (and yes, I know the pro cameras and the pros behind the camera have a lot to do with it).

What can I do to get the best one-man footage from my DVC 80 as possible?
John Britt is offline  
Old September 22nd, 2003, 07:25 PM   #2
Retired DV Info Net Almunus
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,943
John,
Off-hand, I don't know of a specific book that covers the topics you mentioned.

In general, however, getting the "look" you describe is mainly a matter of lighting, good sound, good camera handling and framing. In the camera handling category, using most prosumer cameras for handheld shooting puts you at an automatic disadvantage. They're too light, and their ergonomics are often poor, to get steady professional results.

My suggestion is to practice with your new DVC80. Learn its usage inside and out. Develop an eye for framing / composition.

Much of the footage you see on broadcast television was shot by folks who have spent many years gaining their skills, learning their equipment and who have good eyes for photography.
__________________
Lady X Films: A lady with a boring wardrobe...and a global mission.

Hey, you don't have enough stuff!
Buy with confidence from our sponsors. Hand-picked as the best in the business...Really!

See some of my work one frame at a time: www.KenTanaka.com
Ken Tanaka is offline  
Old September 22nd, 2003, 07:58 PM   #3
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 621
Thanks, Ken --

Camera handling: probably to be solved by tripods in most cases. The DVC80 definitely felt studier and heavier than, say, the GL2, and so far is OK for brief handheld shots, but I will typically rely on tripods (although I saw cheap DIY steadicam instructions on the web that were pretty interesting...and funny).

Framing/Composition: I'm fairly comfortable with this. My graphic design/photo work has helped me get an eye for framing, albeit in a static form. Framing for movement, I assume, adds a whole other dimension (quite literally)

I probably used a poor example in "Trading Spaces." This is going to be quick and cheap work for local cable television -- I don't need to hit TLC (or NBC) standards. Heck, just showing up with a video camera is more than any other videographer in town will do for the money I'm being offered. Still, as with everything, I like to aim as high as possible.

I guess one-man lighting tips and post-pro (After Effects/Premiere) tips on tweaking for the best look would be the kind of books I'm loking for. Obviously, it is too much for everything I want to be in one book (although when I learn how to do it, I will write that book myself if need be!).

Most of the books available focus on learning how to shoot DV as film/for movies -- they focus on lighting for a film look, etc. There are ones geared towards newbies and geared towards prosumer cams. But there don't seem to be any about shooting/editing/post-pro for television, which is a different beast.

Panasonic touts the DVC80 as a broadcast camera -- field reporting and such. So obviously they intend for the final product to air on television. What (besides gaining experience) can a newbie do?

I agree, though, that experience is important -- but sometimes experience only teaches you the long way (or even the wrong way) to do something if you don't have some sort of resource to help guide you.
John Britt is offline  
Old September 22nd, 2003, 08:36 PM   #4
Retired DV Info Net Almunus
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,943
"Video Production Handbook"

John,
I have not read this book, but I have at least one other book by Gerald Millerson and it's well written and presented.

Being a Focal Press book, it may be tilted toward British standards. But it might still fill part of your bill. Amazon features quite a few sample pages from the book.

At amazon.
__________________
Lady X Films: A lady with a boring wardrobe...and a global mission.

Hey, you don't have enough stuff!
Buy with confidence from our sponsors. Hand-picked as the best in the business...Really!

See some of my work one frame at a time: www.KenTanaka.com
Ken Tanaka is offline  
Old September 22nd, 2003, 09:23 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 621
Thanks Ken -- it looks interesting. You may be right about leaning towards UK-standards -- I may see if I can peruse a copy in town before I buy.

Browsing at Amazon, I also found "Lighting for Digital Video and Television" by John Jackman, which address the specific medium; and "Making Documentary Films and Reality Videos" by Barry Hampe, which may cover the type of one-man/small budget/run and gun type of work that would be helpful to me to know more about. Are you familiar with either of these books? (I know Jackman is a respected name over at DV magazine)

Thanks again for your prompt advice!
John Britt is offline  
Old September 22nd, 2003, 09:31 PM   #6
Retired DV Info Net Almunus
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,943
The Jackman book is a good overview of lighting. Do a Search and you'll find several posts about it (not to mention John's own remarks, as he's a member here).

I have the Hampe book but, honestly, have not yet spent enough time with it to reliably comment.
__________________
Lady X Films: A lady with a boring wardrobe...and a global mission.

Hey, you don't have enough stuff!
Buy with confidence from our sponsors. Hand-picked as the best in the business...Really!

See some of my work one frame at a time: www.KenTanaka.com
Ken Tanaka is offline  
Old December 11th, 2003, 06:24 AM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Andalucia, Spain
Posts: 301
What book did you get in the end, John?
This thread is already old, but I just saw it.
Am doing the same kind of work, and have read many books on the subject, among which:

- "The Videomaker Handbook" by Videomaker Magazine
- "Today's Video" by Peter Utz

No single books tells you everything: the first one I like because it offers advice for situations that I recognise, the second book is a wealth of info on video & TV, more like an encyclopedia: everything on how TV works, from connectors to graphics etc.
__________________
Film & TV locations & production Spain
http://www.fotofilmvideo.com/
Dan Uneken is offline  
 

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > The Archives > Read About It

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:33 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network