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Old February 26th, 2005, 12:28 AM   #1
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DvrigPro tips

It sounds like many of the users on this board either own or have experience with the dvrigpro. I'm having a hard time getting reasonably stable footage while walking- medium and slow speed. Im wondering if there is a configuration that may help to offset this or possibly practice/technique or is it just something that I will have to live with.

I would really appreciate any comments so I can make sure this is the right product for me.

Thanks
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Old February 27th, 2005, 04:34 PM   #2
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The DvRigPro. is not a stabilizer, It is a shoulder brace with suspension.

The best walking shoots you can get with it are similar to walking shoots with a full size shoulder camera.

However, practicing the "Steadicam walk" is the key to any smooth walking shoots with or without a stabilizer or any other device.

This walk is kind of "heel to toes" Groucho marx walk.
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Old February 27th, 2005, 05:48 PM   #3
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Interesting--I would actually consider my handheld form to be quite different than my Steadicam form, due to the differences in weight loading on the body and degree of steadiness required. It's actually fairly important to keep your knees straight for Steadicam (at least larger/heavier rigs), but as Danny mentioned, the Groucho walk is the way for handheld or with suspending rigs.
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Old February 27th, 2005, 06:06 PM   #4
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The thing with the humen walk is that when you raise a foot from the ground the body instantly leans to the other direction to
balance it, Otherwise we fall.

So walking is actually a series of side to side sways.

When you do the fast "heel to toes" walk, both feet are in the center of the body and the "torso" is not swaying side ways.

Another issue is the bending of the knees that make the body go up and down. Watch your knees and keep the steps small and fast.

It's atrange at first but becomes second nature if you practice.. practice...practice...

Mark a point on the wall and a line on the floor, practice walking the line keeping the point in center of the frame. Do it for few hours and you will get the habit of it.
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Old February 27th, 2005, 10:09 PM   #5
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I love my DVRig Pro soooo much, can't say enough good things about it.

Like has been said, it is an AMAZING shoulder mount but it is not a steadicam type stabilizer system. I've got a Steadicam Jr. and you won't get those floating type shots with the DVRig.

However, because the DVRig is such a great system you can get closer to a steadicam shot that you could with a standard shoulder mount.

I've been shooting a lot of documentary type stuff and the DVRig is wonderful for walking footage in this style. You can follow people (or lead them) using the Groucho walk and the footage looks perfect because it *does* look like the camera guy is walking (as doc stuff kinda should) but is not distracting at all. It really can look wonderful.

In fact, a steadicam would not look as authentic in those situations because it would look too staged and too phoney.

LOVE ME SOME DVRIG!!! :D
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Old February 27th, 2005, 10:33 PM   #6
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Foe the younger crowd, what are the chances we could get a better idea of this Groucho walk.

As for my original question, I was never under the impression that the DVrig would float like a glidecam or anything close to that, all I am attempting to do is get walking footage that is good enough for a wedding video. Maybe I need to find a way to use both. Thanks for the help, it did give me a much better idea of what to expect.
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Old February 28th, 2005, 12:02 AM   #7
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Groucho walk: bend the knees slightly, try to glide forwards keeping your upper body as level to the ground as possible (minimizing up and down motion). Roll your step from heel to toe, think of your foot as a wheel and transfer your weight smoothly between feet.
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Old February 28th, 2005, 09:31 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally posted by Charles Papert
Groucho walk: bend the knees slightly, try to glide forwards keeping your upper body as level to the ground as possible (minimizing up and down motion). Roll your step from heel to toe, think of your foot as a wheel and transfer your weight smoothly between feet.
One thing I've been thankful for in my career is that I stayed in marching band in high school. Learning to walk with a tuba wrapped around you and keeping your upperbody still has really helped in the video production area.

Who knew! :)
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Old February 28th, 2005, 09:42 AM   #9
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So it is the " Groucho Tuba walk" now.
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