48 Hour Film - An Award Winning Score at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Show Your Work

Show Your Work
Let's see what you're doing!


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old August 27th, 2007, 11:36 PM   #1
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
48 Hour Film - An Award Winning Score

Poorly Projected Pictures recently competed in the 2007 48 Hour Film Project among 55 entries in Portland, OR. We made it to the finals and won Best Musical Score.

Our Genre: Musical or Western (We chose Musical)
Character: Ray or Rachel Schwarz, Quality Control Expert
Line of Dialog: "Do you smell what I smell?"
Prop: Balloon

You can view Heart Break Break In here: http://colonelcrush.com/movie/index/00240001

Areas where I think we did well was with the editing and the pace, as well as the story and use of prop. I especially like that we were able to combine a plot (a heist) with a story (the idiot throws it all away for a girl who will never love him.) Not many 48-hour films try to cram a whole character arc into seven minutes...

Enjoy!
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28th, 2007, 12:49 AM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Elk Grove CA
Posts: 6,838
Nice job, as usual... Jon
__________________
Chris J. Barcellos
Chris Barcellos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28th, 2007, 01:04 AM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Dallas, Texas
Posts: 39
That was really good.

It had a strong story, good pacing and use of the story required genre/character/line/prop.

And yeah, good job on the music.
Aron Yert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28th, 2007, 10:46 PM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
Thanks Chris and Aron,

It was a fun project.

For those of you who haven't done a musical before, this genre can turn your work flow inside out.

In a typical 48-hour film, you write Friday night, film Saturday day, created timed edits Saturday night, and start composing Sunday early morning as the locked edits arrive. By mid Sunday afternoon it's all finishing work: color correction, last touches on effects and titles, dialog normalization, mixing, mastering and dubbing the final tape.

With musical, you write the story and lines, but before you can film, the composer (me!) needs to write the melodies, create temp tracks with clicks and record all of the sung lines. We didn't go on location until 8:30 pm Sunday night. The actors sang with an iPod and BoomBox as the background.

While they filmed, I had only one song that I could orchestrate - the opening scene. All of the other scenes were snippets of melodies, sometimes as much as one verse, but often just a single line, These phrases were separated by dialog and video images. I couldn't really orchestrate those scenes until I got my first time-locked scenes. The first one popped out at 12:00 Sunday. I orchestrated like mad until about 5:15, and mixed until 6:30. We slammed it to tape and drove to Portland with seven minutes to spare.

Next year (assuming we don't get musical again) should be a piece of cake, in comparison!
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 29th, 2007, 02:21 PM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 107
Jon, you might remember me from Northern Sounds (haven't been there in quite awhile and must return soon).

Anyway, loved the film. Loved the music. Your stuff is getting better and better.

rgb
Rob Gregory-Browne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 29th, 2007, 08:34 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 423
I can't even imagine tackling a musical for a 48 hour project. And then to succeed at it?

Well done...

Really, well done.
__________________
"... the drama is on your doorstep..." - John Grierson
www.grvideo.net
Kevin Randolph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 30th, 2007, 12:39 PM   #7
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
Hey RGB! Good to hear from you. I'm still semi-active at NS. And Ern is still there, complaining about his neighbor. :)

And Kevin, thanks for the kind words.

Aside from the upended work flow, musical isn't bad, if you have the right crew. Our five singers all had roles in their high school production of Les Mis. Three of them are formally trained. Marissa (Belle/Rachel Schwarz) will soon start her third year at NYU as a musical theater major. And I've been cranking out music weekly for Colonel Crush.

Otherwise, we could have chosen Western. Hmm. Where can we get a horse on Saturday morning?...
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 3rd, 2007, 06:53 AM   #8
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Oostkamp & Ghent, Belgium
Posts: 32
I am blown away, that was GREAT! Especially considering the 48 hour limit..!
Everything was in place, the story, the acting, the editing, hell: you even scored the damn thing.. :)
I'm really impressed!

I'm entering the contest too (in Ghent). I've never done anything like this before, so I'm very curious in how it will work out.. :)
__________________
My movies:http://nl.youtube.com/user/somatichdg
-> Comments are welcome.
Hyun De Grande is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 3rd, 2007, 12:45 PM   #9
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
Hello Hyun,

I just watched Slappen. VERY intense! Great acting, photography, editing, sound, and music!

If you do a serious drama in the 48, be very careful to set the mood before you show any actors. Titles, music, sound design and inanimate objects are all very helpful.

The challenge is that most 48-hour films are comedies, and many are not well done. So any hint of a wry smile, overacting, stiffness or a wink can bring on laughter. If the drama makes people uncomfortable, they might laugh. If the audience is confused about comedy vs. drama it won't reach its potential.

Also, I recommend that the end titles leave space for introspection. The ideal response is 20 seconds or so of silence, followed by great, somber applause.

With comedy you worry that people might not laugh. As soon as you hear the first giggle, you are relieved. With drama you worry that people WILL laugh. There is no relief, until the end of the film.
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 3rd, 2007, 04:16 PM   #10
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
FRESHLY RELEASED on ColonelCrush.com...

"Us and Them", our 2006 48-hour Portland entry.

We made the finals with this serious drama.

Genre: HISTORICAL FICTION
Character: CARL MARROW, SCRAPBOOKER
Prop: NAIL CLIPPERS
Line: "Oh no, don't you dare go there."

http://colonelcrush.com/movie/index/00250001
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Show Your Work

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:34 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network