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Old April 5th, 2007, 09:18 PM   #1
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Flight 208

This is my first movie that I did in middle school. You can see it at www.stormpointstudios.com. I need some professional feedback.
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Old April 8th, 2007, 10:34 AM   #2
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Can I get some feedback on the movie please?
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Old April 8th, 2007, 11:35 AM   #3
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I'll be completely honest, it was bad. You need to explore After Effects more than use the Particular presets. The story was unoriginal and overall boring. The camera you shot this on is obviously some old consumer camcorder, aren't you that kid that said you were getting an XL2 for you 15th birthday?

Judging from this, you shouldn't buy an XL2 yet. That kind of step needs to be made after taking at least 2 photography/film classes, learn more high-end editing, and max out the capabilities of the camera you already have. Not just make one film that you base your whole career on.

Most of this feedback is negative, but you need to take this and improve on what you're not good at; which is a lot of things.

Although you have figured out shooting, capturing and presets, there is still a LOT more you need to learn before making the big step to professional cameras.
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Old April 8th, 2007, 01:40 PM   #4
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I'm gonna be honest with you here. The only thing I watched was the opening sequence, and then I turned it off. I don't want to come across as a jerk or anything, because believe me I'm probably only a little older than you. What I've learned is that if you are making a low-no budget film and for whatever reason there is a scene or sequence with something like a plane crash or an explosion it is best to not show the audience this event rather than show it badly.

What I mean is in the opening sequence it would have been better to have the sound effects of a plane crashing, someone radioing for help, during the title sequence. Rather than trying to make a cheesy visual of a plane crashing when you can't possibly make it look good on a no-low budget film. Let the audience's imagination fill the rest in.

That's my only advice. Sorry if I came across as harsh I didn't mean it that way.
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Old April 8th, 2007, 02:26 PM   #5
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NICK / FLIGHT 208

Apart from the feedback on your movie, taking your age in consideration,
I believe 14 years, the honest effort to pull off your 20min movie backed
by your web-site and the way you use your website to pull donor
investments justify a word of praise.

When I was your age i was playing pinball machines with every cent i could
lay my hands on. The closest i could get to making movies was to watch
a matinee show.


Go for it ! / Herman.
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Old April 8th, 2007, 03:49 PM   #6
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This was my first try ever at making a movie. Allot of the issues with the camera were cause because I was in the movie instead of using the camera. Next time I'm not in it, and I have an experienced operator. The video quality is much better on the DVD than online, because it is severely compressed. Also, I;m not doing any special effect on the next one. So hopefully it will be allot better.
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Old April 8th, 2007, 03:58 PM   #7
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Actually I was 13 when I made Flight 208. No I'm 14 and I have a ton more experience on other projects.
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Old April 8th, 2007, 04:02 PM   #8
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I'm not the person who said I was getting an Xl2. I am eventually going to get an XH A1 though. I'll add some of my newer project since this one was before I had any experience or professionals helping me.
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Old April 8th, 2007, 05:55 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Nick Royer View Post
I'm not the person who said I was getting an Xl2. I am eventually going to get an XH A1 though. I'll add some of my newer project since this one was before I had any experience or professionals helping me.
That's even worse. You shouldn't jump to High-Def. You have made one amateur movie and you're buying a professional's equipment. Not something you want to do.

And have you ever heard of the edit button Mr. Triple Post?
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Old April 8th, 2007, 07:19 PM   #10
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Nick, you tried and that counts for something. You need to remember when your writing and shooting movies that this is a visual medium, we are visual story tellers, so with that in mind, one thing your movie did constantly was to have the actors saying everything that popped into their head, and state everything they were doing - not necessary. Many of those things are obvious because the audience is watching it happen. For example, the whole berry eating part, most all of that dialog was completely unnecessary. The theme of letting the audience figure it out is a good one to consider, especially on low budget films, for example, Nick Rothwell's suggestion about using sound effects in the opening credits to establish the plane crash is a very very good suggestion. As far as the XH A1 purchase goes, it would be a good idea to wait on that, high definition is very unforgiving, your focus cannot be off, and it is alot to deal with, its alot more everything, more money, more hard drive space, as well as more resolution, and that resolution will make the mistakes all that more visible. I used consumer cam's on many movies before I started using bigger camera's. Photography classes are a great idea as well, as many as you can, and some film classes as well. I personally always stress fine art as too. Searching these forums and reading everything on them and all the responses is another great way to learn, if you dont know what their talking about, look it up, if you want to see the equipment they use check BHphotovideo.com, you can see what their talking about, BH also has some good books that would help you. Pro equipment doesn't mean Pro production, that takes more than what you can buy. We all started somewhere, so keep at it.

-Ben



P.S as far as production value with pro equipment goes improvise, we all do it.
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Old April 8th, 2007, 08:04 PM   #11
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be nice :)

I'll be really honest, I haven't even seen the clip..Yet.. However I will.. I think we all (Chris) need to be professional and provide the younger newer people with constructive feedback and try to support everybody on this forum. He may have lot's to learn but I'm sure he will..We were all there at one point and time..I think that's sometimes easy to forget.. Anyway not trying to start a war, but Nick Keep pluggin away and never stop learning..When you think you don't need to learn any more then that's when you should find something else.

Last edited by Darrin McMillan; April 9th, 2007 at 04:03 AM.
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Old April 8th, 2007, 08:37 PM   #12
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Taking your age into consideration I think that is a huge accomplishment. Thought people were being pretty harsh, but guess introduce him to that early, since there will be a lot of that. I'm sure you learned an unbelievable amount from the whole project. I would say take more time on your shots and over shoot. Get each scene a few times so you can be more picky in post. Good to hear that you are working with some people that have more experience for you to learn from, but hope you keep doing your own thing too. Good luck to you and hope to see more.
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Old April 9th, 2007, 08:00 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Darrin McMillan View Post
I'll be really honest, I haven't even seen the clip..Yet.. However I will.. I think we all (Chris) need to be professional and provide the younger newer people with constructive feedback and try to support everybody on this forum. He may have lot's to learn but I'm sure he will..We were all there at one point and time..I think that's sometimes easy to forget.. Anyway not trying to start a war, but Nick Keep pluggin away and never stop learning..When you think you don't need to learn any more then that's when you should find something else.
I guess I came off a little too harsh, but I was just being honest. Part of being a filmmaker is learning to accept negative feedback and transform it into a learning experience.

From what I've seen, I'm trying to convince him not to waste his money. Considering his age he is probably naive and thinks that Hi-Def is simple and will make a Professional Production. Like someone said earlier, Pro equipment does not mean Pro production. I don't think he really understands what he's getting his dad to buy him..

Like I said, you need to take photography classes to learn the mechanics of a camera. Aperature, shutter speed, f/stops, exposure, aspect ratio, frame rate etc. etc. From there YOU NEED TO COMPLETELY MAX OUT THE EQUIPMENT YOU ALREADY HAVE! Make as many movies as possible, study film, take film classes, view the classics, etc. Once you have peaked in your creativity from there, then MAYBE look into a higher end camera, and THEN Hi-Def.

Lastly, at your age kids are very likely to pick up and drop random hobbies. I remember I wanted to be in a band, a cartoonist, an animator, then a painter, then photographer, and now I've really gotten my heart set on film because you can do ALL those things within this visual medium.

So what I'm saying is, is this some childhood hobby your dad is gonna pay good money for and end up you taking up something else? You need to find yourself more before jumping into the professional equipment pool.

Just a suggestion, if you want to get this camera, be completely clueless, and deprive your dad of hefty money; be my guest.

...Was that harsh?
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Old April 9th, 2007, 08:31 AM   #14
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Nick,

Ok, so it is not very good at all, but you have plenty of time to get better! I would not invest any money in a new camera. I would instead invest my time in practicing with what you have already. A new and better camera will not improve what is wrong, and may just make it worse. especially if you go HD. It just makes everything more complicated, more expensive and it takes time away from studying film-making.

Learn to tell a story with the camera and study how to make films. There are probably plenty of great books and the Omaha public library system should have most of them if you don't want to buy them. (I used to live in Omaha)

Practice your editing, like when and where to cut to tell the story the best. Stay away from special effects until you have everything else in place.

Keep at it, don't quit!

Mike
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Old April 9th, 2007, 11:26 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Chris C. Collins View Post
From what I've seen, I'm trying to convince him not to waste his money. Considering his age he is probably naive and thinks that Hi-Def is simple and will make a Professional Production. Like someone said earlier, Pro equipment does not mean Pro production. I don't think he really understands what he's getting his dad to buy him..
I'm not going HD for a while (2008) so I'm not just doing it now. For the next movie I'm going to have a hired camera operator with an Xl2 who know what they are doing. I'm also buying some new audio equipment because that was one of the major problems with Flight 208. And film making isn't just a hobby I recently took up. I have been doing stuff with the camera since I was seven, but I'm just now starting to figure out how to use more professional equipment.
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