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Sony HVR-V1 / HDR-FX7
Pro and consumer versions of this Sony 3-CMOS HDV camcorder.


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Old March 23rd, 2007, 08:30 AM   #1
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Mic Plug stuck in FX7

Just ordered an XLR to mini-mic adapter with an FX7 from B&H. Inserted the mic plug into the FX7 no problem. However, I can not remove it. I have given it quite a firm tug. Anything more, I think damage would occur.

Anyone experience something like this?
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Old March 23rd, 2007, 11:56 AM   #2
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You could try pushing the plug in a little furthur if it will go, then draw back on it until it binds again. Do this a quite a few times and then try to draw the plug out.

Hopefully some rough edge would have polished enough for the spring to move back and release the plug tip as it should.

If this does not work, push the plug in again then draw back until it begins to bind. Gently twist the plug clockwise, then in the other direction.

Take note of which twist direction offers the least resistence. It may be difficult to determine but there will be one direction slightly less resistent or less rough to the feel.

Once this direction has been discovered, twist the plug constantly in the less resistant direction as you also draw back on the plug to pull it out. While you do this, also gently oscillate the plug body to put a little side pressure on the plug pin in a rotating direction the opposite to the direction you twist it.

This will open up a clearance where the plug pin insulation is binding on the inside face of the socket tube or reduce enough pressure on the spring face that it resists less and allows the plug to come free or walk a high edge of an insulation segment over a sharp edge in the socket or scythe it off and the plug will come free.

If this does not succeed, then it is best left to a workshop to do the job.

(If the component manufacturers would take a little notice of the original designs by old wrinklies who first invented the plugs and sockets and not eliminate the small chamfers and rounded edges in the interests of faster production, then these problems might not occur.)

Last edited by Bob Hart; March 23rd, 2007 at 12:05 PM. Reason: cant spell
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Old March 23rd, 2007, 05:50 PM   #3
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Bob-

Thanks so much for taking the time to share your thoughts. I followed your steps religiously, but unfortunately with no success. This adapter came in a bundled with a mic, so in all likelihood it is of inferior quality and not 100% of the correct design as you point out.

Well, I hate to continue fiddling and end up damaging something, so I will try to return to B&H or take it to a workshop as you recommend.

Thanks again.
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Old March 23rd, 2007, 08:44 PM   #4
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There's one more trick below you could try but check with the vendors who supplied you camera and mike adaptor first about your warranty. Check also with their respective service departments to see if they have a home fix for you.

Given the possible mechanical leverage that plug has over the internal bits and pieces of the camera, I would have some concerns about shipping it as it will be almost impossible to pack it so that the weight of the camera does not come onto the plug in violent events during transport

In electronics stores like Tandy etc., you can buy a can of spray lubricant for electronic components. It comes with a small drinking straw looking thing on the sprayer.

Dont spray this stuff directly on the part as it is very difficult to control the dose which comes out.

Instead, spray into a desert spoon to make a little pool, then use the straw, or a satay stick to pick up a drop of the lube and apply this to the point where the plug pin goes in so it wicks in down the sides of the pin.

If you can get hold of a film camera lube bottle with a fine tip or find a disposable diabetic syringe, so much the better for delivering the lube to the spot. take care to wipe the spill off the plastic casework of the camera. Keep adding small increments until the stuff ceases to wick down.

It will probably need about three drops worth because it is going to have to make its way down around the pin, then gather enough to move along the pin to the tip and spring. Leave it overnight with the camera resting so the pin end is pointed down so the lube will move down and for the light fractions to dry off and deposit some useful lube, then give it another try.

The quality of the plugs and sockets is not necessarily inferior. It is likely of much better quality than the original products due to modern materials and finer tolerances achiveable with modern manufacture.

What happens is over a time, with long standing designs, the patent times out or is licenced out. The intellectual culture and memory which surrounded the original design is lost and the newbies make innovations on their own which may have already been decided against.

One such more noteworthy event happened in Australia with avgas. A particular ingredient was of a minute proportion of the total fuel mix. Somebody decided that adding a little more would be better. The result was creation of sludges in the fuel system which could and possibly did bring aircraft down with engine failure. The original reasons for not doing so were known but apparently buried in history back.

Last edited by Bob Hart; March 23rd, 2007 at 08:58 PM. Reason: correction
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Old March 24th, 2007, 06:06 AM   #5
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Is it possible that this plug is the type that screws onto the camera? I believe the 1/8" mini plugs also have threaded variants. Perhaps your became partly screwed in place and you are trying to pull it straight out?
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Old March 27th, 2007, 10:46 AM   #6
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Bob-
Thanks again for taking the time and sharing your suggestions step by step.

I did go to Radio Shack and get lubricant for electronic components and was able to get some into the jack, incidentally not easy without just spraying it.

Still no luck. I now think it a something in the FX7 itself, such as the spring being damaged, as there is a small amount of play then it binds suddenly.

Well, have my return for repair # from Sony, so I guess off in the mail. I will package safety to prevent pressure on plug.

Marcus –
I wish it was simple as a threaded plug. If it was that would have been as bad as the time as saying something did not work and someone saying “Is it plugged in?”

Thanks guys
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Old March 27th, 2007, 11:08 AM   #7
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Sorry to hear you are still stuck.

Seems like the latching spring/pawl may have caught a sharp edge on the plug pin and turned under which would make it bind when trying to pull the plug back out as you describe.

I had this happen once a long time ago when an earpiece plug got stuck in a transistor radio. I thought things would have come along a bit since then as that was 1968.

I had to dig and gouge with a compass point to set it free and it was not all that good thereafter.

However, that same trannie radio, an old Panasonic is still under my head at night to this day, ready for the morning wake-up news.

Last edited by Bob Hart; March 27th, 2007 at 11:12 AM. Reason: added words
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Old March 27th, 2007, 11:10 AM   #8
 
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I've seen plugs have some excess plastic on the isolator rings; that also could be catching. Other than hitting a Sony service center, the careful lubrication, rotation, and push/pull option is likely your best shot.
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Old March 27th, 2007, 04:46 PM   #9
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Jonah, I gotta put the stupid answers in there in case someone forgets. I find my problems often have an overlooked stupid answer. I actually didn't know about threaded 1/8" plugs for a long time. I've never had a 1/8" plug stick on me, and I hope I never do. I hope something simple or stupid solves the issue.
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Old April 12th, 2007, 01:35 PM   #10
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Marcus-

I know what you mean. Sometimes we can overlook the simplest of solutions because we are convinced it is something complicated.

Anyways, FX7 had been sent back to Sony, so I am sure it is in good hands.

Thanks.
Jonah
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