FX7 opinions needed - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Sony XAVC / XDCAM / NXCAM / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Sony HDV and DV Camera Systems > Sony HVR-V1 / HDR-FX7

Sony HVR-V1 / HDR-FX7
Pro and consumer versions of this Sony 3-CMOS HDV camcorder.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old July 4th, 2007, 02:03 PM   #16
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Pinellas Park
Posts: 232
HI,

If you're waiting for a high definition camera the size of a HC7 or HV20 with a 20x zoom lens, it won't happen in my opinion. Larger lens means poorer light performance, so it comes down to lens size vs. picture quality, and picture quality is more important.

Considering what you want to do with the camera, I highly recommend the HV20. It'll give you everything you need and at a decent price. The instant focus works well, and when you get motivated to try manual focus, it has a very nice focus assist. I choose the HC7 myself but only because the HV20 didn't have a LANC jack. I don't use auto focus that often, so that's not a biggie. I do wish it had a focus assist, though. The HC7 also doesn't feel as fragile as the HV20. Both cameras can double as still and video, but the HC7 has better resolution stills. Personally, I don't believe in using a video camera for stills. Anyway, good luck on your choice for a camcorder.
John Bosco Jr. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 4th, 2007, 02:33 PM   #17
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Traverse City, Michigan
Posts: 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu Holmes View Post
Mike - an ND filter is basically like sunglasses for your camcorder.

thats it ! (in simplistic terms)
Thanks to Boyd and Stu. I think I understand now.

Mike
Mike Burgess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 4th, 2007, 05:09 PM   #18
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,414
Ha another explanation.. :-)

Mike, The lens opening on cameras can be wide open or closed down with the aperature... and several settings in between....

When a lens is wide open it lets in more light and the exposure of light to the sensor is shorter in time for a good exposure.

Besides creating the ability to capture high action with such short exposure times it also creates a shallow depth of field.

When a lens is closed down it lets in less light and the exposure of light to the sensor is longer in time.

In this case, high action footage could suffer bluring and the extra time for the light presented at the sensor for proper exposure creates a picture with more depth of field.

So if you are outdoors in very bright light but you want be able to adjust your exposure and keep a shallow depth of field (wide open lens) you just use a ND filter.

As indicated in a previous post... your putting the sun glasses on your camera so you can control the depth of field and exposure timing to your likes. This way you can calculate and produce the depth of focus for your shot.

On camera's with very fast lenses (F1.8 for example) you have to put in place ND filters because the shutter speed will be maxed out due to too much light and the footage blown in the high lights. Most cameras have built in ND filters to help you out in this situation. External ND filters let you deside to the strength of ND filter to use so you can get the results you want while shooting. Its of course a option to use both internal ND filters and external filters......

Most cameras will flash a warning in the display when a ND filter is required.
Ray Bell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 4th, 2007, 09:34 PM   #19
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Traverse City, Michigan
Posts: 416
Thanks Ray. Does the FX7 have these filters built in? If not, how do you determine which to get? If they are built in, are additional ones necessary? I will be doing some panoramic shooting out west this next summer, with some exposures taking in as much of a field of view as I can get. I have a degree in Geology and am really interested in getting as much detail from the landforms and rock formations as I can, and seeing it all in its natural settings. When shooting from a distance, I want to be able to emerse myself in the end product....the video that I have shot. For me that means not only seeing what my eyes would naturally see, but also being drawn into the picture and "feeling" the colors, texture, and scope of the whole picture on the widescreen TV. Whether it be close up shots of rock cuts or broad, sweeping panoramic shots of the Big Horn Basin from the mountains at sunrise, I want to see it as it really is, as it I were still there. I think I am saying that depth of field, details (ie clarity), and overall PQ (colors and textures) are very important.
THATS why I am so excited about the FX7. From what I saw from my friends footage shot with his new FX7 on my plasma, it seems just what the doctor ordered. Some day I'll be too old to get out there and see the west and all that beauty. With the DVDs that I will be producing, I'll be able to visit it all again and again, and lose myself once more in each scene on the TV.

Mike
Mike Burgess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2007, 05:49 AM   #20
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,414
Mike, yes the FX7 does have the built in ND filters, two of them....

you should also consider getting a polarizer filter for your shooting methods that you have described and with this filter in place it will also help with the exposure/depth of focus in outdoors settings...

in this case its like putting sunglasses on your camera that are polarized :-) using this method will also bring the light down so you can use the internal ND filters.

if you liked the colors and detail with your friends FX7, learn how to use the rotating polarizer and you'll get much better color saturation......

before you get your own FX7 you might want to download the manual and read up on the use of zebra exposure assist and the use of the built in ND filters...
Ray Bell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2007, 06:19 AM   #21
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Traverse City, Michigan
Posts: 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Bell View Post
before you get your own FX7 you might want to download the manual and read up on the use of zebra exposure assist and the use of the built in ND filters...
Thanks again Ray. Where can I find the address to download said manual?

Mike
Mike Burgess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2007, 07:49 AM   #22
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,414
http://www.manualshark.org/manualsha...4/pdf_6671.pdf
Ray Bell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2007, 08:45 AM   #23
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Nicosia, CYPRUS
Posts: 1,080
Mike you can find it here: http://www.sony-asia.com/section/support

Stelios
__________________
My Blog: http://steliosc.blogspot.com
"I hope for nothing, I fear nothing, I am free" Nikos Kazantzakis
Stelios Christofides is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2007, 08:51 AM   #24
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Traverse City, Michigan
Posts: 416
Thanks guys.
Mike
Mike Burgess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2007, 09:59 AM   #25
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Garden Grove CA
Posts: 239
Thanks for all the posts this has helped me alot. I video every thing from family stuff to wildlife. I love high definition but I miss my 18x optical and focus ring on my really old Sony D-8mm cam. Im suprised how many features are missing from the recent cameras. I think I need to look at it one more time at the Sony store.

Thanks guys.
__________________
My videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/lucasberg
Joey Atilano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 6th, 2007, 12:59 AM   #26
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Los Angeles CA USA
Posts: 507
Joey
I've checked out your post and your site - you may be a hobbyist but there's nothing neophytic about your clips.
I'd recommend the FX7 for your use. It's just small and light enough not to get in the way, and advanced enough to be a step above your existing cameras.
Check out my thread in this section called "call me silly but..." or somesuch.
I think you'll find quite a lot of your answers there.
Drop me a PM if you have any further questions.
Cheers
Chris
Chris Leong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 6th, 2007, 06:54 AM   #27
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: New York
Posts: 28
Very happy as a prosumer with the FX7!!

I have been very pleased with my FX7 purchase. It was an excellent step up from my HDR-HC1! The 3 chip images are pristine, and the manual controls make a huge difference. Low light is better , and limiting gain along with a shutter of 1/30th helps you reach into the dark much better than the HC1.

The FX7 is certainly larger than the HC1, but still very manageable in a messenger bag around town. (I think the HC1 will still be useful for my out of town family trips).

The only real competition to the FX7 is the Canon A1 at a price of almost $1,000 more! It may be somewhat better, but as a prosumer the FX7 is an excellent choice!

--Robert
Robert Altman is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Sony XAVC / XDCAM / NXCAM / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Sony HDV and DV Camera Systems > Sony HVR-V1 / HDR-FX7

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:54 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network