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Sony HVR-Z1 / HDR-FX1
Pro and consumer versions of this Sony 3-CCD HDV camcorder.


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Old March 19th, 2006, 02:46 PM   #1
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best filter for a z1u ?

im looking for a filter for the z1

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for the camera experts, which do you think is a better quality?
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Old March 19th, 2006, 03:09 PM   #2
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I wouldn't purchase either. The prices are simply far to low to be good quality. Putting filters like that in front of the lens of a Z1 is almost a sure bet to degrade the quality of the acquired image. For reasonably good quality filters, on a budget, I suggest looking at the Hoya SMCs (Super Multi Coat).
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Old March 19th, 2006, 08:44 PM   #3
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I use Tiffen filters on my Sony Z1 and I get them from B&H Photo. Same price range as the Hoya. Beware eBay and camera equipment. You never know what youíre getting and itís usually junk. (i.e., you get what you pay for and sometimes you donít even get that much!)

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Old March 20th, 2006, 09:13 PM   #4
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I've had good results purchasing filters on eBay.

Howver, you must know what you want.

I only purchase Hoya filters, and then, only the Pro HMC Super filters.

I just bought two from a guy in Hongkong, and they arrive in a about a week.

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He sells both B+W and Hoya filters which are both good quality filters.

Hope this helps
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Old March 21st, 2006, 07:09 AM   #5
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I dont want to hijack this thread, but I want to ask, I'm looking at getting 2 Hoya Filters, One UV, and a Polariser for my New FX1, and They are 56, and 78 Australian dollars respectively.

I want the UV filter on 100% of the time to protect my investment, but can you attach the polariser without removing the UV... I'm asuming you can, since its from the same company, and as long as the thread is still the same.

Additionaly, how many filters can you attach until that new snazzy lens hood gets in the way?

I also hear that buying a sperate lens cap for storage helps becuase the flashy new lens hood cant protect it from dust as well as a cap would.

Thanks..... Please ignore me if it sounds like I hijacked the thread.
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Old March 21st, 2006, 08:34 AM   #6
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Old March 21st, 2006, 11:16 AM   #7
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Oops, sorry about that. Major noobie here.

Leo,

Depending on how zoomed out you want to go, you'll start to get vignetting if you attach too many filter on your lens.

If I attach a polarizer or other color filter, I always remove the UV filter first. That's just the way I've always done things. Maybe that comes from my still camera stuff. But espeically if you're using a wide angle lens, you can't have too much sticking out or it will start vignetting. That's why you'll see some 'thin' filters. Those are for wide angle lenses.

If you're not wanting to remove the UV filter, you might want to get a matte box or something like that. I think Cokin makes a Z-Pro that's available from B&H. I think that would be a less expensive way to go than the typical matte box.

Haven't tried it yet though.

Hope this helps,

Jim
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Old March 21st, 2006, 11:19 AM   #8
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B+W / Schneider Optics Filters

http://www.schneideroptics.com
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Old March 21st, 2006, 02:17 PM   #9
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I sure wouldn't put anything lesser than a Hoya SMC filter (the Super Multi Coated filters, not the cheaper Hoyas) in front of the lens of a high definition camera. The B+W MRCs make more sense to me (high quality multiple coatings on high quality optical glass), unless the budget is really tight. I do have a couple Tiffens on cheap consumer cameras, but that's about it. Think about it for a second, does it make any sense at all to put a $10-15 piece of what amounts to little more than bare uncoated window pane glass in front of the lens of a $4500 camera? The cost of a B+W MRC UV filter, from B&H Photo, is about 2%-3% of the cost of a Z1. A Hoya SMC UV filter costs about 1%.
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Old March 21st, 2006, 09:33 PM   #10
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how many filters

"how many filters can you attach until that new snazzy lens hood gets in the way?"

You have to read the specs carefully. You want both thin and threaded if you want to add filters onto it. B&H does give good detailed specs by each filter so you can open the appropriate tab to read if it has those features. I think it handy to have a threaded thin UV so that you don't really have to remove it if you don't want to before threading on the next one. Just check you full wide when they're on to see if it vignettes for those shots where you need full wide.
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Old March 22nd, 2006, 01:40 AM   #11
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I just bought the Sony UV Filter and Polarizer from B&H - what do people think of that one?

Am I right to believe it's safe to point my camera at the clear blue sky now?

I'm not really sure of whether it's doing anything.

To me, the Polarizer would offer better protection from the sun, being so much darker. But the polarizer, when screwed on, prevents the matte box from being itted back on. Is this detrmental?
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Old March 22nd, 2006, 11:08 AM   #12
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polarizer etc.

Don't know what "matte box" you have on your Z1, but the lens shade that comes with the Z1 fits on when I have my filters on. I always get the "thin" versions for this reason. I'd never want to shoot without a lens shade on unless it in a controlled situation with no reflective surfaces or lights towards the lens.

If you're not experienced using a polarizer, you should do some test shots over sky & water, windows, etc. while dialing in the proper position - I assume you have the "circular polarizer". These have limited use, but very good when used correctly for specific purposes. You may know this already, but the position of the circular polarizer needs to be rotated according to what's in the frame and your position in relation to the sun or strongest light source. Keep turning it while watching the same scene, eg., shooting down onto shallow water surface and trying to see the bottom without having excess refection on the water interfere - as the sun moves, or you move, your effect changes, etc.

When you say you're not really sure it's doing anything, I think you probably have not learned how to use it. If it's not dialed in correctly, you see no effect, or too much.
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Old March 23rd, 2006, 07:01 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Gorman
When you say you're not really sure it's doing anything, I think you probably have not learned how to use it. If it's not dialed in correctly, you see no effect, or too much.
You are correct but I'm less concerned with the effect of the polarizer than I am with the effect of the UV filter. I bought the pack because I was told a UV filter was a necessary purchase for outdoor work to protect the insides of the camera. Is that a fact? And is the Sony one a good one?
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Old March 23rd, 2006, 07:12 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hewat
I was told a UV filter was a necessary purchase for outdoor work to protect the insides of the camera. Is that a fact?
You will find a lot of discussion on this topic throughout the various camera forums. The reality is that anything you put in front of the lens is going to degrade quality to a certain degree. To really see this in action, try pointing your camera in the general direction of the sun (not directly into it!) and notice what happens. Any dust or smudge on the filter will show up, and you will get internal reflections.

The filter isn't going to protect the "insides" of your camera, but it can keep dirt and crud off the lens surface. I haven't really looked at my Z1 that closely, but most camcorders have a clear glass element at the front of the lens for protection anyway.

It's funny - I got a UV filter at B&H when I bought my Z1 and left it in place for the first 6 months I had the camera. Then I started realizing that in many situations it could degrade the HD image, and I haven't screwed it back on since then :-)

As they say, "your mileage may vary." You have to weigh the risk of damaging your lens vs a possible quality loss. This probably has more to do with the kinds of places you'll be using your camera than anything else....
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Old March 23rd, 2006, 07:31 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyd Ostroff
...try pointing your camera in the general direction of the sun (not directly into it!)...
What's the problem with pointing your camera directly into the sun? I'm not aware of the risks and can't decipher what's written in the other threads. And when is it ok? Can you do it at sunset when it's easy on the eyes to look directly at the sun anyway? Can you do it through tinted glass, or when you have a polarizer attached, etc?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyd Ostroff
As they say, "your mileage may vary." You have to weigh the risk of damaging your lens vs a possible quality loss. This probably has more to do with the kinds of places you'll be using your camera than anything else....
Thanks for your response - next time I hang my camera out the driver's side window whilst driving to get those great David Lynch shots of the yellow lines I'll make sure I have the filter on.
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