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Sony HVR-Z5 / HDR-FX1000
Pro and consumer versions of this Sony 3-CMOS HDV camcorder.


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Old March 4th, 2009, 05:38 PM   #16
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Thanks Rob, good info. I never even knew that guide existed since I always shoot 4:3 for SD projects.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 07:55 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Stelios Christofides View Post
Adam
I have been so far recording in DV mode, editing in DV and producing excellent DVDs. Now if what you are saying is true, then I should record in HDV and downconvert in the cam. But I can't understand the technical issue of this. Why should it be better quality?

Stelios
I'm not sure I understand your question. Better quality than what?

Better than shooting DV in the first place? It seems to me that keeping your res as high as possible for as long as possible in the workflow should yield you the best picture in the end. Let's just say that every step in the process results in a loss of x% quality (however you define quality). It's better to have those losses off a higher base, so it's still way better than DV when you render to DV. If you start out in DV, every degradation takes it lower below the spec.

If you mean why is it better to downconvert in cam than via software later, a lot of feedback I've seen has been that the cams just do a better job of this, but I'm sure it depends on the software you have to do the downconvert in your PC. But if Ken says he can't tell the difference, then I believe him and either way should be fine.

In any event, it's never made any sense to me to shoot in DV mode in an HDV cam, as in my opinion the most important attribute of and HDV cam is that it's, well, HDV.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 07:58 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Allen Bartnick View Post
So if 1080i is the same as 30p, should I render the video in progressive?
No, 1080i is not the same as 30p. Your cam does 1080p30 OR 1080i60. Both are 1080 lines and are HD.

Unless you like the look of 30p, I can't see any reason to convert 60i to it. Even so, if you like that look that's how you should shoot.

Experiment with your new cam; only you know what you like best.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 08:21 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Adam Gold View Post
It seems to me that keeping your res as high as possible for as long as possible in the workflow should yield you the best picture in the end. Let's just say that every step in the process results in a loss of x% quality (however you define quality). It's better to have those losses off a higher base, so it's still way better than DV when you render to DV.
Adam, I really think you're overstating this. I've done A/Bs with my Z5 using 4:3 SD vs 16:9 HDV down-rezzed in camera as well as in my Edius Pro program. Since Edius is essentially lossless to DVD (certainly to the naked eye) when editing in DV from start to finish, I can't see the 'way better' approach in starting with HDV. Setting my Z5 to 4:3 DV from the start still yields a noticeably better picture than my VX2100.

The major 4:3 DV differences in the Z5 relative to the 2100 are in color, exposure and detail. Those differences, in my opinion, are certainly more significant than the differences between starting in HDV and down-rezzing to SD either in-camera or in editing.

But hey, we each look at things differently and whatever works for you.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 08:30 PM   #20
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Sorry, I didn't put it well. I was agreeing with you. When I said "way better" I didn't mean one way was way better than another, only that even bad HD is much more than 480 lines, so downconverting to SD from even bad HD is better than DV that has been degraded by the same amount... if in fact any degradation exists, which these days isn't all that likely.

For me, I just do everything in HD and actually make a BD .iso in case someone wants one, then downconvert and burn off all the SD DVDs. So I have the best of both worlds... but it took me getting a PC that was more expensive than my car to be able to do it.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 08:43 PM   #21
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OK, I got it Adam. I know one extremely good reason for starting with HDV (even if you know the final project will be SD) is for future marketing. I think Jeff mentioned this and my friend who also owns the Z5 has also thought this was a good idea.

That to me is one of the tremendous things about the CF Recorder. You can keep your project in HDV on tape and do a rapid transfer to your editing program in DV from the CF Recorder if you'd rather do it that way than in your editing program.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 09:24 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Adam Gold View Post
Opinions vary a lot, but the general consensus is, if you have the horsepower in your PC to make HDV editing a breeze, do everything in HDV and then downconvert at the last second when you make your DVDs.
This is exactly the point. When you shoot and edit in HDV you're able to save your project files and timeline in HDV. In the future you can always render it out to a Blue Ray. There may even be a market for current customers getting DV to upgrade to HD down the road.
It's much more flexible.
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