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Sony HVR-Z5 / HDR-FX1000
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Old July 31st, 2009, 03:25 AM   #1
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Teaser trailer wedding z5 and z1

Mark and Maxine Teaser on Vimeo


hope you enjoy the teaser for my sisters wedding

luke
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Old August 2nd, 2009, 05:47 AM   #2
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Thank you for posting Oliver.

Overall it needs tightned up - a lot. It drags very badly. It's 22 seconds before we see the first action. Did I mention the pace is too slow? Longer is not better.

Ten seconds of your company name on the screen should be cut to three or less. Six seconds of black space at the beginning should be cut to almost none.

An establishing shot would've been nice.

In 2 1/2 minutes of video we get basically approximately 6 clips each around 5 seconds long. It almost seems you had a shortage of great shots and you were stretching out your video. I'm not saying that was the case, but that is how it appears. With the number of clips used video should've been a minute or less.

The use of the choir is nice idea but the quality of the audio is poor due to peaking and ambient noises at the beginning that lead you to expect anything but a carriage. Where is the audio from the horses hooves? Who is in the carriage? We don't know because we never see them board or unboard. We never see who is in it.

Your attempt at a moving shot during the first dance should be replaced with a tripod mounted cam shot, it looks like your walking by them, its not a good quality moving shot.

The shot of your sister coming down the aisle is dark apparently because the auto mode of the camera set the exposure for the woman's hat which ruined the shot. I would use the portion of the shot after she passes the hat ladies where it is hopefully better.

Cut the amount of screen time of the fireworks shot, there's too much and it loses it's impact after 5 or 6 seconds.

Lastlly and important: there are no closeups. At least one or two closeups are essential. There is a lack of intimacy without them.

Bottom line, if you cut it down to less than a minute you'll be much happier with the results.

Oh, I almost forgot, the faaaaades are tooooo lonnnnnng. You are allowed to use jump cuts. They would work well to offset the somnolent effect of the music.

Last edited by Jeff Harper; August 2nd, 2009 at 06:51 AM.
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Old August 2nd, 2009, 06:53 AM   #3
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I agree with Jeff on his advice. Especially having more close up shots, its a mistake nearly everyone seems to make at some point, I guess its because a close up is not as safe as a mid shot.

The only other thing I would add to Jeff's comments is with the fireworks shot I think it would have looked so much better if you filmed from a lower angle so the fireworks were exploding behind the bride and groom. It just looked a bit odd having the bride and groom in the bottom corner, it almost looks like you've accidently caught them in the frame while trying to shoot the fireworks.

Overall though, not bad, there are some good shots in there and I have seen wedding videos which are way worse than this.

BTW I really like your Mark and Chantal and the Joel and Diana Teasers, I feel they are a bit more original and unique

Good luck with future videos.
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Old August 2nd, 2009, 06:58 AM   #4
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I agree Jonathan, about the lower angle. I noticed it also but there was so much to comment on.

Luke: Just watched another of your trailers. Consider tightening up your style, as mentioned above.

***May I suggest you get familiar with the rule of thirds. If you are already familiar with it then I would suggest you use it more. Your shots will improve dramatically.

You are trying hard to be artsy/cinematic. You must concentrate on learning proper framing of your subjects before getting creative.

Often videographers will use a loose shooting style and call it cinematic. I did it when I began. I used music to cover up my shortcomings as a camera operator, and I called it cinematic.

Study and use the rule of thirds. Get more conventionally framed shots. Then you can edit creatively and you'll actually have more freedom in the cutting room.

The suggestion made to me that has been most invaluable was that a video/film should tell it's story well enough that you do not need to hear the audio. If you can watch and be entertained without listening to the audio, you have made an effective piece.

Last edited by Jeff Harper; August 2nd, 2009 at 07:32 AM.
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Old August 2nd, 2009, 08:24 AM   #5
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Luke, here's an excellent example of how to shoot and edit. Wide shots followed by closeups. One minute long. It is not pretentious, but simple and effective.

By watching this trailer I've seen how even I have strayed from enough closeups, and it has inspired me greatly. Great stuff. For example for my next shoot I will duplicate the shot of the couple walking and frame their hands holding...brilliant shot and yet one I've never done. It's a common shot, nothing new, but just a shot I've never thought of doing.

I discovered this in the event forum here at dvinfo.net

Barwick Multimedia Blog Archive Aleisha & Jens | Mullumbimby wedding
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Old August 3rd, 2009, 10:20 AM   #6
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Luke, it appears to me you have exactly the look you intended, a teaser for your sister.
I think Jeff made some good points regarding the slow opening but I didnít have a problem
with your compositions at all. Also, with the piece basically being in slow motion, the long
fades were in line with the look of the video and audio. I agree the fireworks were too long (was that added in?). Iím sure your sister loved it.
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Old August 4th, 2009, 02:53 PM   #7
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re

ive been thinking about it alot actually today. I will re edit , it was a rushed job cause i had to get something on my new website, i do have shots of them in the horse and so on, and the sound. it was quickly thrown together.

ive been reading about the rules of thirds and will certainly keep it in mind next shoot. i shoot solo with 2 cams , 2 tripods merlin and fisheye so my framing lets me down cause im rushing with all my stuff, i need an assiatant. This is only the 4th one i have done.

all information taken onboard. i shall post more soon to see how the comments differ

cheers everyone for the info and feedback.

very honest

luke
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Old August 11th, 2009, 09:46 AM   #8
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Luke, if you are shooting with two cams, arrive early at the church, setup your 2nd camera first thing, test your wireless and have it ready. Done. If you are unable to be early to the church, (say they won't unlock the doors early) there's nothing you can do about that.

To study the rules of thirds is simple. Reading about it is good, but more importantly start watching TV / movies with this in mind and you'll see how its done.

Even with the current trend of shaky looking footage on tv shows, they follow this rule.

The main thing when we are starting out as wedding videographers is to begin with the basics: Proper framing of subjects and a steady, tripod-mounted camera whenever possible. I often run with a tripod in one hand and camera in the other, primarily during the outdoor photo shoots, as I like to have shots of them walking toward the camera and away as well. Avoid handheld shots whenever possible initially. As you become more proficient with framing techniques on the tripod, your handheld work will improve as the framing of subjects is more second nature.

If you run two cameras at the reception, you really need an assistant to watch the second camera, otherwise your choice of locations is too limiting unless you have it super high in a corner for a bird's eye view. It can be done without an assistant, but is dangerous to guests and to your gear (think tripping over tripod leg, etc.) and is stressful.

BTW, your shot of the fireworks was not the worst, but a slight change in framing would have improved it immensely.

The thing is it is easy for us to judge someone's work while sitting in the comfort of our homes, but actually getting great footage is difficult. Since I use a tripod virtually all of the time, your fireworks shot would have been difficult for me as well. I would have had to shorten the tripod legs to the right height, in the meantime possibly losing time to capture the shot. To get something usable is better than capturing nothing because I was spending time fiddling with the tripod. The most important thing in your case is you got the shot!

Last edited by Jeff Harper; August 11th, 2009 at 03:25 PM.
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Old August 11th, 2009, 12:44 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Harper View Post
To study the rules of thirds is simple. Reading about it is good, but more importantly start watching TV / movies with this in mind and you'll see how its done.
As a sidenote, the Z5 has a MARKER > GUIDEFRAME setting in the DISPLAY SET menu that will assist with the rule of thirds, although the Z1 does not.
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Old August 20th, 2009, 11:40 PM   #10
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Thats some great advice Jeff.
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