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Sony HVR-Z5 / HDR-FX1000
Pro and consumer versions of this Sony 3-CMOS HDV camcorder.


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Old April 11th, 2010, 02:14 PM   #1
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HD out via HDMI

anyone actually recorded to an HD deck from the Z5 using HDMI (while shooting)?
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Old April 12th, 2010, 01:29 PM   #2
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At least with the Sony HDV decks (M25, M35), the HDMI is OUT only. Note that the M15 does not have HDMI at all. HDMI isn't really meant for recording, only display. But some tapeless recording devices do have HDMI In. I believe they add their own timecode, as HDMI doesn't carry the cam's timecode at all.
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Old April 12th, 2010, 07:09 PM   #3
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[anyone actually recorded to an HD deck from the Z5 using HDMI (while shooting)?[/QUOTE]

Charlie,

I'm sure you're not just asking but seek more info.
While I've not done so, I've seen some pretty comprehensive testing results at NAB with the Convergent Design nanoflash, high speed, tapeless recorder from HDV cameras. Extremely impressive video quality. Stuff I would be proud to show on a huge screen no doubt. While a regular tapeless solution (HDD, SDHC, CF) records at the same datarate as tape (25mbps), the nanoflash can record up to 35 mbps in XDCAM EX (like the Sony EX-1) or 160mbps in XDCAM HD (long GOP) 422 if you're inclined to go that way. Essentially, you can "upgrade" your camera's resolution without buying a new camera for the price of the recorder. Of course the nanoflash goes for about $3K but consider that you get a redundant recording system (tape and tapeless) plus you don't have to relearn a new camera manual-of-arms. The nanoflash has both HD-SDI and HDMI inputs. You leverage all your existing gear. The downside is that while the recorder is quite small and uses CF cards, it takes up real estate on your camera, belt, or elsewhere.

Pesonally, I have no applications or requests to shoot at better than what I can deliver with HDV. I use a Focus Enhancements DTE HDD recorder which gives me redundancy albeit at the same 25mbps data rate. However the FS-5 DTE has cool features that no other recorder offers such as remote, wireless access to the database so my PA can take notes on an iPhone or iPod and post to the metadata IN REAL TIME. Also, I can play back proxy video files on a screen on the recorder. Is that cool or what?

If you truly need to upgrade video resolution as cheaply and quickly as possible the Convergent Design product might be the way to go. But ask yourself if that's what you really need. I think it's overkill for on-line presentation and even for most presentation. But if large screen display is normal for your clients and you have lots and lots of hard drive storage space, check it out.

Dave Burckhard
PicturePoint On-line
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Old April 12th, 2010, 08:32 PM   #4
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<<Pesonally, I have no applications or requests to shoot at better than what I can deliver with HDV>>

dave, like you, I'm normally happy with HDV for my own projects and usual clients. but I would like to be able to record and deliver true HD.I wouldn't buy a $3k device but would rent an expensive HD deck and use an HDMI to SDIHD interface. this sort of thing is always trumpeted when cameras like the Z5 are written up, that you can get uncompressed video directly from the chips, but I haven't heard of anyone actually doing it. of course with the right budget I could rent a true HD camera but still wondering if this scenario is possible with the Z5.
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Old April 12th, 2010, 11:46 PM   #5
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i agree with dave - hdv is good enough to all intents and purposes at the moment for nearly any production going to disk distribution.

i doubt any punter would be able to tell the difference between it (hdv) and full hd on the general run of the mill lcd / plasma tvs around at the moment.

for full broadcast you really need a serious camera -

from pbs specs - For high definition, the camera must use three CCD chips, each with at least a 1/2 diagonal and a minimum resolution of 1280 x 720.

from discovery specs - SOURCE MATERIAL NOTES

Non-HD Footage Limitations:
Maximum of 25% non-HD material is allowed in production, with no more than 1 minute of contiguous non-HD footage in any sequence.

Use of HDV Footage:
1080 line HDV footage may be used in HD programs with the following restrictions:

 Program may not contain any more than 15% HDV footage.
 The combined percentage of HDV and SD upconverted footage is not to exceed 30%.
 Producers wishing to use HDV must submit an approved post production path outlining their handling of the footage in the editing process.
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Old April 13th, 2010, 10:06 AM   #6
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there are other ways of distributing besides PBS or disk, the most common being HD projection. anyway I was just asking if anyone had done it, not whether a "punter" could tell the difference. some people claim that the NX5 has a better-looking image than the Z5. if one could get an uncompressed signal from the Z5 it should be better than the AVCHD recorded by the NXCAM.
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Old August 20th, 2010, 04:11 PM   #7
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Would have to say the Z5 with a Nanoflash is well worth the cost, Time lapse at 1 frame per second, undercrank, overcrank, progressive or interlaced, 4:2:2, and best of all PCM audio. Only thing that is a pain is the lack of synched audio. HDMI cable only delivers video and audio, so no rebatching lines from tape if needed.
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Old November 30th, 2010, 01:51 PM   #8
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Anyone know if the FX1000's HDMI output is 8bit or 10bit?

Is it 4:2:2 or is it 4:2:0?

Thinking about that Atomos Ninja!

CT
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