Sony DSR-390 Help!!! - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Sony XAVC / XDCAM / NXCAM / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Sony HDV and DV Camera Systems > Sony VX2100 / PD170 / PDX10 Companion

Sony VX2100 / PD170 / PDX10 Companion
Topics also include Sony's TRV950, VX2000, PD150 & DSR250 family.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 30th, 2009, 08:03 AM   #16
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia (formerly Winnipeg, Manitoba) Canada
Posts: 4,087
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Bloom View Post
As for the VF, I always set it as Shaun suggested but would adjust the brightness a bit brighter, I mean just a tiny touch.
Don, I do too, JUST to see what's going on in my DEEP greys AND to give myself a bit of "visual headroom" with blown out whites. I thought that was MY little secret. Again though, this is something one should only attempt on a CRT viewfinder. Other than the inevitable fatigue of having a high contrast black and white TV 2" from your eye (who thought THAT was a good idea?!?!?), I sure miss CRT 'finders for just plain old KNOWING what my exposure was. LCDs give long runtimes but they pale in comparison to the usefulness of a good CRT 'finder.
__________________
Shaun C. Roemich Road Dog Media - Vancouver, BC - Videographer - Webcaster
www.roaddogmedia.ca Blog: http://roaddogmedia.wordpress.com/
Shaun Roemich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 09:32 AM   #17
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Worthington, Iowa
Posts: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Bloom View Post
Wow, I went to bed, woke up and found 4 news posts here. Everything Shaun said except for me I never had a problem using certain lenses on auto iris and using the "pinky button".
Personal choice but anyway, once you set the shutter to 1/60 run some tests I think you'll find a nice difference. As for the VF, I always set it as Shaun suggested but would adjust the brightness a bit brighter, I mean just a tiny touch. It was a safety precaution to me and a bit more comfortable for my eye. I also used an I-Cuff on my VF. Again, just personal comfort.
The DSR390 is still a great camera-you should be able to produce a rich looking quality image with it.
Not to get redundant here but I want to make sure I am doing this right.. When you say set the shutter to 1/60th all i have to do is to turn the shutter switch on the front of the camera under the lens "Off"? and that will default my camera to 1/60th? Also, adjusting the zebra stripes, i just do that in the menu?
__________________
Jeff Mayne
Gone Thinkin Outdoors
Jeff Mayne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 10:26 AM   #18
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia (formerly Winnipeg, Manitoba) Canada
Posts: 4,087
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Mayne View Post
hen you say set the shutter to 1/60th all i have to do is to turn the shutter switch on the front of the camera under the lens "Off"? and that will default my camera to 1/60th?
Yep.

The menu on zebra will set at what level zebra begins to appear: in IRE - 70 - 75, is highlight on caucasian skin tone, 100 is absolute white. People use zebra differently, depending on their comfort level/work flow.

The actual exposure using zebra is controlled by opening or closing the iris to ensure that the zebra pattern is appearing ONLY at the appropriate places, given your zebra setting (again, highlights on skin IF zebra is set around 70 or 75, brightest white in the scene if zebra is set to 100).
__________________
Shaun C. Roemich Road Dog Media - Vancouver, BC - Videographer - Webcaster
www.roaddogmedia.ca Blog: http://roaddogmedia.wordpress.com/
Shaun Roemich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 12:03 PM   #19
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Worthington, Iowa
Posts: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun Roemich View Post

The actual exposure using zebra is controlled by opening or closing the iris to ensure that the zebra pattern is appearing ONLY at the appropriate places, given your zebra setting (again, highlights on skin IF zebra is set around 70 or 75, brightest white in the scene if zebra is set to 100).
Shaun, when you say appropriate places what do you mean? Also, I hooked this bad boy up to a monitor just now, shot indoors and it was perfect - vibrant, rich and the perfect exposure, it recorded to the tape just like it looked on the monitor. The viewfinder instruction was awesome, thanks... but it is still blowing out the colors when I shoot outside. Overcast day, I tried manual white balance at 7000 degrees, iris I shot on manual and went up from the recommended iris and down and it still looks like crap, colors are not there, building about 80 yards away from me is white with a red sign and it looks soft and out of focus and slightly overexposed. I am ready to put this thing on ebay and go back to HD...
__________________
Jeff Mayne
Gone Thinkin Outdoors
Jeff Mayne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 12:38 PM   #20
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Mayne View Post
Shaun, when you say appropriate places what do you mean? Also, I hooked this bad boy up to a monitor just now, shot indoors and it was perfect - vibrant, rich and the perfect exposure, it recorded to the tape just like it looked on the monitor. The viewfinder instruction was awesome, thanks... but it is still blowing out the colors when I shoot outside. Overcast day, I tried manual white balance at 7000 degrees, iris I shot on manual and went up from the recommended iris and down and it still looks like crap, colors are not there, building about 80 yards away from me is white with a red sign and it looks soft and out of focus and slightly overexposed. I am ready to put this thing on ebay and go back to HD...
First check your backfocus. If the building is out that's the problem there. As for colors being washed out outdoors, that could be 1)the iris is opened up to much 2) the WB is whacky 3) a combination of 1&2 OR there's something in the menu that's causing that. I don't remember all that's in the menu(s) but IIRC you can set up some color and WB settings there but again it's been many years since I used a 300 series camera so I might be wrong on that.
Since you're getting the right stuff indoors on the monitor you SHOULD be getting good stuff outdoors so it really sound more like a WB thing than anything else.
__________________
What do I know? I'm just a video-O-grafer.
Don
Don Bloom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 01:39 PM   #21
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Worthington, Iowa
Posts: 191
We will see, i just took it to the wild outdoors, sunny outside and shot many terrain features and landscapes using all manual settings. I am going to hook her up here in a minute and if you see that there is a new classified ad in the private classified sections you know what happened... Don, not sure if I meant out of focus or just complete lack of detail from being overexposed!
__________________
Jeff Mayne
Gone Thinkin Outdoors
Jeff Mayne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 01:57 PM   #22
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Worthington, Iowa
Posts: 191
OK, no new posts on the classifieds yet, looks like full manual is the way to go, just have to learn to fine focus better when I zoomed into a shooting target at 56 yards the target was not real clear, had the peaking turned up and it looked in focus but when I played it back it looked out a little bit. Maybe I am too used to the clarity and sharpness of HD and can't get it out of my head and have too high of expectations for the 390. Thanks for everyone's help!
__________________
Jeff Mayne
Gone Thinkin Outdoors
Jeff Mayne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 03:14 PM   #23
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia (formerly Winnipeg, Manitoba) Canada
Posts: 4,087
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Mayne View Post
when I zoomed into a shooting target at 56 yards the target was not real clear, had the peaking turned up and it looked in focus but when I played it back it looked out a little bit.
THAT is indicative of a back focus issue. I'm hesitant to TALK anyone through the back focus procedure as it is easy to make things worse. Anyone braver than I want to explain the procedure or is there a good link on here that explains how to do it on a MANUAL lens?
__________________
Shaun C. Roemich Road Dog Media - Vancouver, BC - Videographer - Webcaster
www.roaddogmedia.ca Blog: http://roaddogmedia.wordpress.com/
Shaun Roemich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 03:24 PM   #24
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Hilversum, The Netherlands
Posts: 184
There should be a section in the manual for that, I think it's called focal flange correction..
It shows how to set backfocus if I remember correctly..
Sander Vreuls is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 03:28 PM   #25
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun Roemich View Post
THAT is indicative of a back focus issue. I'm hesitant to TALK anyone through the back focus procedure as it is easy to make things worse. Anyone braver than I want to explain the procedure or is there a good link on here that explains how to do it on a MANUAL lens?
not me. I have always had a hard enough time getting my own lenses backfocused correctly. Such a fine adjustment, I love tightening up the locking screw and the damn thing goes out just as you get it tight. Blah!
__________________
What do I know? I'm just a video-O-grafer.
Don
Don Bloom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 03:58 PM   #26
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Worthington, Iowa
Posts: 191
I did my focal flange corrections when I first got the lens, maybe I need to try it again and see if it moved. Thanks
__________________
Jeff Mayne
Gone Thinkin Outdoors
Jeff Mayne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 04:34 PM   #27
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia (formerly Winnipeg, Manitoba) Canada
Posts: 4,087
Ok, the ABSOLUTE KEY to doing a flange focal distance correction is to ensure the iris is as wide open as absolutely possible. Use Neutral Density and/or shutter speed to get the lens WIDE open, giving you the shallowest possible depth of field. Setting FF distance with an aperture of f8 is like spitting in a rainstorm.
__________________
Shaun C. Roemich Road Dog Media - Vancouver, BC - Videographer - Webcaster
www.roaddogmedia.ca Blog: http://roaddogmedia.wordpress.com/
Shaun Roemich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 05:31 PM   #28
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Mayne View Post
I did my focal flange corrections when I first got the lens, maybe I need to try it again and see if it moved. Thanks
IMO it is something that needs to be check frequently. Those little thumb screws that are used to lock the BF in place have a habit of either coming loose or coming loose. ;-)
Especially with a lens that's a bit older sometimes the threads wear just enough to warrant check BF often, like everytime you pull the camera out to use it. Sometimes it's out just enough that you really can't see it in the VF but when you put the footage on a monitor, you go Ooops! Damn, I thought it was in focus. Been there said that!
__________________
What do I know? I'm just a video-O-grafer.
Don
Don Bloom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2009, 10:15 PM   #29
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Worthington, Iowa
Posts: 191
I followed the directions in the manual to do my Focal Flange Corrections (back focus) and it told me to hold the chart 10 feet from camera so that is what I did, but now I read on video university that the chart needs to be a minimum or 75 feet from the camera, could this be part of my problem? It is too dark outside to try it now that is why I am asking instead of trying.
__________________
Jeff Mayne
Gone Thinkin Outdoors
Jeff Mayne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2009, 04:14 PM   #30
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia (formerly Winnipeg, Manitoba) Canada
Posts: 4,087
The difficulty is that the chart needs to be far enough away so that you can set up flange focal BUT close enough so that you can tell if the lines are in focus. I probably use my chart at between 15 & 20 feet because any further away, I just can't see the detail enough in wide angle. (My chart is the one that came with my lens so it's only letter sized - I haven't sprung for a large one yet as with my 1/3" chips in MY camera, getting it close enough, really is good enough).
__________________
Shaun C. Roemich Road Dog Media - Vancouver, BC - Videographer - Webcaster
www.roaddogmedia.ca Blog: http://roaddogmedia.wordpress.com/
Shaun Roemich is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Sony XAVC / XDCAM / NXCAM / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Sony HDV and DV Camera Systems > Sony VX2100 / PD170 / PDX10 Companion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:47 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network