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Old April 4th, 2006, 08:18 PM   #1
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manual focusing for VX2000

I've had my Sony VX2000 for about two months and I've having problems utilizing the manual zoom feature. This upcoming year I want to film some of my friends hunting adventures. Now, the problem I have is when I use the automatic zoom feature it focuses on objects that aren't of interest. I'm using this camera to film small game hunts, so as an animal comes into the general area we're hunting I'll start filming but get a blurry image. I know this is because Iím using the automatic zoom mode, but I would like to learn how to use the manual option. On the VX2000 there are two rotating mechanism in the end of the lens. If I put the camera in manual focus mode and zoom out as far as the camera will let me and use the fine focus knob at end of lens to make image clear, will this eliminate my problem? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I thought this hobby was going to be a pretty easy one, but the more I know the tougher it gets. Thank you and have a blessed week.

David Ellis
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Old April 4th, 2006, 08:40 PM   #2
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It is the correct way to focus the camera. It won't help you if the animal comes into the frame at an appreciably different distance from the camera and you want to leave the lens zoomed all the way to maximum focal length. You may have to refocus.

If you expect them to come down a game trail, you can prefocus and then follow them as they move.

Pro setups use a follow-focus lens which may have a pistol grip that you squeeze more or less to focus on fast moving objects.

If you can handle the image at minimum focal length, then focus isn't hardly required. But all you can do at maximum length is to practice a lot until focusing is automatic.

Yup, the more you know, the tougher it gets. One sometimes wonders how the professionals do it.
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Old April 4th, 2006, 08:40 PM   #3
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Also, I've been doing a little research on getting a focusing feature that hooks up to the camera and allows you to zoom the camera in and out feet from camcorder. I don't know much about this, but i was thinking about getting the sony remote commander. It's cheap and I'm assuming will do the trick. In my earlier posting, I'm having problems with objects coming into focus, which aren't of interest. I want to learn how to manually zoom in and out and look some what professional. I know this won't happen, but with a little help and hours of practice, it could be done. If anyone knows of other cheap remoted commanders that are better than what I've listed and can do what I'm wanting to accomplish...please let me know? Take care and hope all have a blessed week!

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Old April 4th, 2006, 08:45 PM   #4
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Mike,
So I zoom out as far as camera will allow me too and then use fine focus knob to make image clear and then I can use the zoom button to follow animal from the farthest point all the way into my stand (where I'm hunting)? Or will I have to use the fine focus know every couple feet as the animal gets closer to my stand? Mike, thanks a million for the comments you've provided!
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Old April 4th, 2006, 09:11 PM   #5
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Not quite. Maybe. Got to test it and see.

You might find that if you zoom to a shorter focal length as the animal approaches you, the effects of the wide angle will mask the focus problem that you would be if you had the lens set at the longest focal length.

The remote focus controls I've used are fairly slow. Problem with not touching the camera is if you have to aim the camera to follow the animal, you might as well just use the control on the lens.
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Old April 5th, 2006, 03:14 PM   #6
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Well, this weekend I'm going to practice this method of zooming. This seems to be my biggest problem in filming hunts. There'll be a couple of little shrubs in front of my hunting spot and the camera wants to focus in on them instead of the animal. I've watched many hunting shows and tried to see their techniques, but they never show the preparation before they start filming. What is the easiest way to fine focus the camera in manual mode? After you do this can you use the in and out focusing button to eliminate my problem? In my previous postings, I stated a possible process to help with this problem, but if anyone has a technique they use everytime they use manual zoom please provide steps of your technique. Thank you so much and have a blessed day!

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Old April 5th, 2006, 11:45 PM   #7
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"What is the easiest way to fine focus the camera in manual mode? After you do this can you use the in and out focusing button to eliminate my problem?"

I think you have referred to a near/far focus "button" more than once and it makes me think that you have confused the zoom rocker switch with a focus button. Focus is done either automatically or with the larger ring on the end of the lens.

I like to leave the camera in manual mode, but occaisionally hit the temporary auto-focus button when the subject has changed distance. The depth of field on these cameras is so great you almost only need to focus near or far. There is an instant infinity focus feature on the VX2000. Just pull down on the focus selector button and it goes to infinity. This is probably what you need the most. I put a tiny piece of velcro strip next to my momentary auto-focus button so I can reach it without having to take my eyes of the monitor.
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Old April 5th, 2006, 11:52 PM   #8
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Where is the "momentary auto-focus button" located on the VX2000? Marcus, thanks for the advice. I'm new and yes I used the wrong terminology for far/near focus button. I'll leave camera in infinity mode to try and eliminate my current problem.
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Old April 6th, 2006, 08:39 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Ellis
Where is the "momentary auto-focus button" located on the VX2000?
Just under the Focus (auto/man/infinity) selector, read the manual at page 58.
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