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Sony VX2100 / PD170 / PDX10 Companion
Topics also include Sony's TRV950, VX2000, PD150 & DSR250 family.


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Old October 4th, 2006, 12:32 PM   #1
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Buying a VX2100!

I've decided that buying a VX2100 brand new from B&H photo (opposed to a used GL2 off ebay) with extra battery, seperate charger and 4 year mack warranty and of course a backpack to keep it all in.


I plan on buying a UV filter to keep over the lens at all times to protect it, but is there anything else anyone could reccomend that i should buy?
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Old October 4th, 2006, 12:59 PM   #2
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Video light?
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Old October 4th, 2006, 01:08 PM   #3
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Monopod or tripod
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Old October 4th, 2006, 01:42 PM   #4
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Wide angle adapter will be need for close quarter shooting..
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Old October 4th, 2006, 02:29 PM   #5
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I plan on buying a Raynox MX-3000 fisheye lens
tripod i have already and a video light might be a good idea
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Old October 4th, 2006, 02:30 PM   #6
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Also, could anyone send me some footage from their VX2100?


my email is live2roll0126@gmail.com
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Old October 5th, 2006, 09:31 AM   #7
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Check this out http://video.skyfilmproductions.com/ . The newer (upper) clips under General category from Tallinn Air Traffic Control Centre are VX2100 and also the Sun Valley Airpark under Trailers.
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Old October 5th, 2006, 04:23 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Georg Liigand
Check this out http://video.skyfilmproductions.com/ . The newer (upper) clips under General category from Tallinn Air Traffic Control Centre are VX2100 and also the Sun Valley Airpark under Trailers.

Thanks! Very helpful!
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Old October 6th, 2006, 09:47 AM   #9
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You're welcome! Glad I could be of help.
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Old October 10th, 2006, 04:18 AM   #10
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Why do you want to 'protect the lens' Shawn? Are you going to film in dusty, wet, smokey, children places? If not, don't use a 'protective filter' as you'll add to the flare, reduce the hooding and have two more surfaces that you have to keep spotless (on top of the front element).

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Old October 10th, 2006, 01:02 PM   #11
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A high-quality filter will make very little difference to the quality of the image and will protect the front lens element from life's little dings. Furthermore, the very act of having a protective filter on the front keeps the front of the lens (and the back of the filter) clean.

I keep a B+W filter on the front of all my cameras (still and video). The coating on the filter is just as if not more resistant to flare and other problems as the coating on the lens.

Of course one always needs to operate with a lens hood and other spot shade tools to keep the light out of the lens.

Obviously one will have a hard time placing any sort of cover over a fish-eye.

BTW, you do know that a fish-eye adapter will grossly distort the image? For most viewers, a fish-eye image is very difficult to visually decipher.
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Old October 10th, 2006, 02:11 PM   #12
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well, the reason i was going to protect the lens is because i plan on filming skateboarding and rollerblading, and fisheye for when i'm getting those close in shots

but i wont be getting close with no fisheye on so i dont have to worry about the lens getting scratched
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Old October 10th, 2006, 05:38 PM   #13
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You don't need a fish-eye to get close. You use a fish-eye (or a wide-angle) to encompase a wider field of view.

In my experience, it has rarely been the expected accident (including getting close) that dings the camera.

You do understand that the fish-eye is going to heavily distort the image?
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Old October 11th, 2006, 08:16 AM   #14
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I've had to replace two UV filters that were broken or scratched while on camcorders. Instead of replacing a $750. lens and repairing one that cost $2,000., I was out $22. and $52. for the filters.
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Old October 11th, 2006, 02:36 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Rehmus
You don't need a fish-eye to get close. You use a fish-eye (or a wide-angle) to encompase a wider field of view.

In my experience, it has rarely been the expected accident (including getting close) that dings the camera.

You do understand that the fish-eye is going to heavily distort the image?

Yes, i have a fisheye for the current camera i have.
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