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Sony XDCAM EX Pro Handhelds
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Old April 7th, 2008, 06:00 PM   #1
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Lens cleaning?

Not that the lens is different than any other lens I have owned, but at the price of this camera, I don't want to make any mistakes! Just out of curiosity, what do you use and how do you clean the lens on your EX1?

Thanks in advance,

Phil
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Old April 7th, 2008, 06:55 PM   #2
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just use a microfiber cloth like those made by Luminex, or if really necessary lens tissue and Pancro. That's how I've been taught to clean MUCH more expensive lenses than this.

-Sean
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Old April 7th, 2008, 07:02 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Hanna View Post
Not that the lens is different than any other lens I have owned, but at the price of this camera, I don't want to make any mistakes! Just out of curiosity, what do you use and how do you clean the lens on your EX1?

Thanks in advance,

Phil
I have never cleaned my EX1 lens and I never will. First job should be to put a protecting filter on. I recommend B+W 486 IR/UV 77mm slimline if you intend to stay with the included sunshade and not get a matte box. If you get a matte box your options change but you should still do it.
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Old April 7th, 2008, 07:57 PM   #4
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One time my lens looked all oily, and no microfiber cloth would clean (I don't like using liquids) so I got my blower brush and started blowing and brushing for several minutes, the lens was like new after some minutes.

Why the cloth would make it look dirtier and the blower brush made it look like new?

I was using this cloth (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ing_Cloth.html) and the blower brush was some cheapo brand.
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Old April 7th, 2008, 08:37 PM   #5
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sometimes a cloth will just move oil around, especially if it is old and dirty. Pancro is a very good lens cleaning solution when used sparingly, and was originally designed for cleaning front surface mirrors.

-Sean
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Old April 7th, 2008, 08:57 PM   #6
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Clean your lens!

Don't be scared of cleaning the lens. It's a pro lens and is designed to be cleaned several times per day for years. Lens coatings are very durable.

All motion picture lenses are cleaned routinely, repeatedly. And it's not recommended to put any filter in front of a lens except when it's in danger of damage or spray of some sort.

Pancro is a great lens cleaner, but there are others. Moist breath works well, with a proper lens tissue. Rosco is what I use. Just never clean the lens dry and you will be fine.
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Old April 7th, 2008, 10:49 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Eric Pascarelli View Post
Don't be scared of cleaning the lens. It's a pro lens and is designed to be cleaned several times per day for years. Lens coatings are very durable.

All motion picture lenses are cleaned routinely, repeatedly. And it's not recommended to put any filter in front of a lens except when it's in danger of damage or spray of some sort.

Pancro is a great lens cleaner, but there are others. Moist breath works well, with a proper lens tissue. Rosco is what I use. Just never clean the lens dry and you will be fine.
Why do you think a protective filter is bad?
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Old April 7th, 2008, 11:02 PM   #8
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It's not definitely bad - but it will degrade the image, even if only slightly. It will never be as good as a "clean" lens, except if the filter is there to help create a desired effect.

Filters don't generally have the anti-reflective coatings that lens elements do, and are susceptible to flaring in the form of internal reflections.

Also, dirt on a filter is much more likely to be visible in the image because it's father away from the front element and will be more in focus than dirt sitting directly on the lens.

If you are careful you can get fine results with a clear filter on - but it adds a couple extra things to worry about (subtle things you may not notice in the finder) besides just keeping your lens clean.

If your lens is in hazardous conditions it's a good trade off to cover it up with clear glass. But normal environmental dust and dirt aren't a hazard - they clean up very easily.
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Old April 7th, 2008, 11:10 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Eric Pascarelli View Post
It's not definitely bad - but it will degrade the image, even if only slightly. It will never be as good as a "clean" lens, except if the filter is there to help create a desired effect.

Filters don't generally have the anti-reflective coatings that lens elements do, and are susceptible to flaring in the form of internal reflections.

Also, dirt on a filter is much more likely to be visible in the image because it's father away from the front element and will be more in focus than dirt sitting directly on the lens.

If you are careful you can get fine results with a clear filter on - but it adds a couple extra things to worry about (subtle things you may not notice in the finder) besides just keeping your lens clean.

If your lens is in hazardous conditions it's a good trade off to cover it up with clear glass. But normal environmental dust and dirt aren't a hazard - they clean up very easily.
Don't forget I said that the EX1 needs an IR filter anyway. Maybe if you are in a cold environment with cold ground not so, but for me who shoots docs in the desert an IR is a must so I guess different situations different approaches. Personally, I'm not scared of cleaning but of accidental damage and sand damage form dust storms that I often shoot in.
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Old April 7th, 2008, 11:12 PM   #10
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... sand damage form dust storms that I often shoot in.
Sandstorms are definitely a hazard worth the protection of a clear filter, in my opinion.
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Old April 8th, 2008, 02:54 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Eric Pascarelli View Post
It's not definitely bad - but it will degrade the image, even if only slightly. It will never be as good as a "clean" lens, except if the filter is there to help create a desired effect.

Filters don't generally have the anti-reflective coatings that lens elements do, and are susceptible to flaring in the form of internal reflections.

Also, dirt on a filter is much more likely to be visible in the image because it's father away from the front element and will be more in focus than dirt sitting directly on the lens.

If you are careful you can get fine results with a clear filter on - but it adds a couple extra things to worry about (subtle things you may not notice in the finder) besides just keeping your lens clean.

If your lens is in hazardous conditions it's a good trade off to cover it up with clear glass. But normal environmental dust and dirt aren't a hazard - they clean up very easily.
Using a clear filter in front of my Z1 lens greatly increased lens flare when there was a bright area in frame, removing the filter cured the problem. Try it for yourself by aiming the camera toward a scene that has a bright sky in it.

Geoff.
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Old April 8th, 2008, 03:27 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Eric Pascarelli View Post
It's a pro lens and is designed to be cleaned several times per day for years. Lens coatings are very durable.
Are you sure, Eric?
I have been reading for years that professional multi layer coatings (on lenses and filters) are very sensitive.
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Old April 8th, 2008, 05:38 AM   #13
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They definitely can be scratched, so make sure whatever you're cleaning with isn't covered in dirt or sand. They will not however wear through with lens cleaner and a piece of lens tissue, or a dry microfiber cloth. As I said, this is how we clean MUCH more expensive lenses like panavision primos or zeiss master primes.
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Old April 8th, 2008, 07:31 AM   #14
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They definitely can be scratched, so make sure whatever you're cleaning with isn't covered in dirt or sand. They will not however wear through with lens cleaner and a piece of lens tissue, or a dry microfiber cloth. As I said, this is how we clean MUCH more expensive lenses like panavision primos or zeiss master primes.
Exactly. Panavision Primos and the like are sometimes cleaned three or four times per day and they last for years, being rented virtually every day of the year. But I should have added that it's proper procedure to blow or brush off the big abrasive particles before wiping the lens to avoid scratching. And you should always exercise utmost care when cleaning/handling optics and follow accepted procedure.

But still, it's much harder to scratch a modern lens coating than you might think.

I am not saying that you should be cavalier with your lenses, only that lenses are designed to be cleaned routinely (using proper procedure) without fear of damaging them.

Non-rhetorical question: Has anyone on the boards had any issue with a scratched EX1 (or other pro) lens? If so, how did the damage occur?
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