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Sony XDCAM EX Pro Handhelds
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Old July 18th, 2008, 01:09 AM   #1
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1080P best settings

I love the look of the 1080p, but I am getting really heavy strobing when people move through frame, camera is stationary, I have the shutter switch of, 1080p 24 @ 35 HQ, 1/48th shutter, anyone shooting 1080p that could give me there setup for the least strobe, if I have to shoot 30p that is still O.K, but would prefer 24p.

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Mike
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Old July 18th, 2008, 04:44 AM   #2
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Strobing is going to occur in 24p. From my experience Shutter on set to 1/48 yields the best results. To minimize strobing make sure your camera is steady, you pan with your subject (keep them in the same part of the frame) and keep your depth of field shallow.

When switching from 60i/60p shooting for the first time strobing is a little jolting. But after awhile you get used to it and it seems natural. Once you're used to 24p and go back to 60i THAT looks weird/too smooth like watery or something and you have to get used to that again!
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Old July 18th, 2008, 08:57 AM   #3
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Thanks Adam, I don't move the camera, but if an arm swings up quickly it looks horrible, I have all the settings as you stated.

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Mike
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Old July 18th, 2008, 09:07 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Adam Reuter View Post
Strobing is going to occur in 24p.
I'm in PAL-land so I assume the same holds for 25p.

Can anyone recommend the best settings to minimise these effects when shooting fast moving subjects like racing cars?
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Old July 18th, 2008, 09:11 AM   #5
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I'm in PAL-land so I assume the same holds for 25p.

Can anyone recommend the best settings to minimise these effects when shooting fast moving subjects like racing cars?
For this kind of action, definitely 720/50p.
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Old July 18th, 2008, 12:51 PM   #6
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Yes, definitely 720/60p or 50p are your only options other than interlaced if you want smooth movement of your main subjects. You might want to try shooting 1080/60i or 50i and applying a de-interlaced filter in post if you want to maximize spatial resolution. However, you will find that your subject's motion will no longer be as smooth compared to the original interlaced footage and will look very similar to what would have been shot in 30p. Also, you can try varying your shutter from OFF (or 1/24, 1/25, 1/30) and double these twice up to 1/96, 1/100 and 1/120 respectively for 24p, 25p or 30p. Here you'll find that you'll have either motion trailing (shutter too slow) or strobing (shutter speed too high) or somewhere in between. There simply is no substitute for fast progressive frame rates.

1080/60p of course would be ideal but it would probably be a year or more before this trickles down to cameras in the EX1 class.

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Old July 18th, 2008, 01:47 PM   #7
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For this kind of action, definitely 720/50p.
So why not 1080 25P?

Also, what shutter settings should I go for?

Last edited by John Gilmore; July 18th, 2008 at 01:48 PM. Reason: Additional comments
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Old July 18th, 2008, 03:32 PM   #8
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So why not 1080 25P?

Also, what shutter settings should I go for?
John - for the very reasons the initiator of this thread mentioned: too much fast movement (either of the camera, or objects within the camera framing) will cause stuttering. This has been discussed so thoroughly in so many places, that I will only mention one golden rule for 24/25p: relative movement must be slow enough to take no less than 7 secs from the frame edge to edge.

As to your other question, that depends on many factors; but exposure aside, you could as well leave the shutter off (i.e. to 1/50 for 50p, or 1/60 for 60p), or go faster for even less motion blur (like 1/100th and 1/120th, respectively).
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Last edited by Piotr Wozniacki; July 19th, 2008 at 02:21 AM.
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Old July 19th, 2008, 10:18 AM   #9
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too much fast movement ... will cause stuttering. This has been discussed so thoroughly in so many places.
Could you cite some references please? I'm interested in reading more on this issue.
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Old July 19th, 2008, 08:02 PM   #10
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Could you cite some references please? I'm interested in reading more on this issue.
Hi John,
I understand your problem. I had the same when I bought my JVC111 and started shooting progressive, almost threw the camera away. I wanted to take the camera back because I couldnt understand how to get rid of the shudder. One chap on this site told me that I had to learn to shoot differently and after I did that I would not shoot any other way now. In fact, it is difficult to get the shudder due to the adapted way of using the camera. It doesnt matter about shutter speeds etc, it's all in the way you track the subject, and we rarely pan anymore. I shoot tV commercials for a living and only ever shoot progressive. I would't shoot interlaced again. All my work has taken on a different look and I love it. There is a lot of information on the net but you will have to learn to shoot a totally different way.
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