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Sony XDCAM EX Pro Handhelds
Sony PMW-300, PXW-X200, PXW-X180 (back to EX3 & EX1) recording to SxS flash memory.


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Old December 12th, 2008, 06:30 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Luce View Post
A lot of conflicting information in this thread.
Why don't you get more exact?
But anyway, to write something non-ambiguous:

The generally recommended playback-rate - shutter-combinations are:
24fps - 180
25fps - 180
30fps - 180
50fps - 360
60fps - 360
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Old December 12th, 2008, 12:39 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominik Seibold View Post
Why don't you get more exact?
But anyway, to write something non-ambiguous:

The generally recommended playback-rate - shutter-combinations are:
24fps - 180
25fps - 180
30fps - 180
50fps - 360
60fps - 360
By "Playback" you mean what setting to render out in the timeline?

I'm still trying to figure out what setting to "Record" in,
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Old December 12th, 2008, 01:18 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Brian Luce View Post
By "Playback" you mean what setting to render out in the timeline?

I'm still trying to figure out what setting to "Record" in,
I don't understand you. Of course I meant the setting while recording. You can not set the shutter-speed in post. ??
I mentioned the playback-rate because of the possibility of over-/undercranking. The shutter-angle must depend only on the final playback-rate of the recorded pictures, not the recording-rate. Without a slomo- or timelapse-effect (and without droping frames) playback-rate=recording-rate.
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Old December 12th, 2008, 02:59 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Dominik Seibold View Post
I don't understand you. Of course I meant the setting while recording. You can not set the shutter-speed in post. ??
I mentioned the playback-rate because of the possibility of over-/undercranking. The shutter-angle must depend only on the final playback-rate of the recorded pictures, not the recording-rate. Without a slomo- or timelapse-effect (and without droping frames) playback-rate=recording-rate.
You can set templates in post for various frame rates. I think of shutter speed and frame rate as different things, I thought that's what you meant, the term "Playback" confused me. sorry.
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Old December 12th, 2008, 03:29 PM   #20
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So if my settings are 1080 x 25p and shutter is on @ 1/50 I lose 1 stop and less motion blur.
@ 1/100 lose 2 stops less motion blur.
@ 1/250 lose about 3 stops and now way less motion blur on those pans.
Am I on the right track?
Otherwise just set the shutter to an angle of 180 and the camera sorts it's self out, is this correct?
Simon
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Old December 12th, 2008, 03:42 PM   #21
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for 25p use 1/50s (=180)
for 50p/50i use 1/50s (=360)
if you shoot 50fps for playing back with 25fps (slow-motion) use 1/100s (= 180)

Again:
shutter-angle = 360 x shutter-speed/framerate
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Old December 13th, 2008, 05:59 AM   #22
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I set the frame rate to what suits the recording situation best. As has been suggested in this thread, carry out some test recordings when possible. Once you become accustomed to the shutter speed behaviour - and it can take a while - you start learning very quickly what suits.

Although there are a few shutter setting 'rules' (guides) for general recording, it does not work for all situations.

You may want to have a 'sharp' look on motion so you need to adjust the shutter to a reasonable level. One popular effect for a car's wheels looking like they are standing still (or close to it) when following it along the road or track, is to adjust the shutter speed to a high level.

I found that it takes practice and experimenting to find the best shutter speed for the job. Yes, one does lose a stop or 4, but pretty much most of my high level shutter speeds have been confined to the outside during the day, so I have not really had a problem with light levels.

Sorry I cannot offer specific shutter speeds as they are all different. What I can say is that I have learnt a lot about the EX3 by experimenting with different settings. Some were very useful and others are for another time.

I'm off to continue my experimenting with some detail levels in my Picture Profile settings.

Best holiday wishes to all.
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Old December 14th, 2008, 06:24 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by David Issko View Post
One popular effect for a car's wheels looking like they are standing still (or close to it) when following it along the road or track, is to adjust the shutter speed to a high level.
By "high level" you mean small shutter angle or high shutter speed (e.g. 1/500). Actually a fast shutter will not make a car's wheels appear stationary unless the frame rate is "tuned" to the revolutions of the wheels. The most simple case is the wheel rotating one rev per frame, and the more usual is the wheel rotating one repeating segment per frame (e.g. spokes). The phenomenon most commonly noticed is the wheels appearing to rotate backwards. This is all about phase relationships between frame rate and wheel rotation, not shutter speed.
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Old December 14th, 2008, 03:08 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Serena Steuart View Post
The phenomenon most commonly noticed is the wheels appearing to rotate backwards. This is all about phase relationships between frame rate and wheel rotation, not shutter speed.
What you say is correct. However, a slow shutter speed will blur the wheel and spokes so that not enough detail is visible for any apparent rotation to be seen.
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