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Old January 27th, 2014, 10:16 AM   #1
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How did he get this shot?

I have a quick question. I was watching this video the other day and was wondering how the videographer got a few shots.

I was wondering how the first two shots were done, the 4th shot and the shot at 12 seconds.

Any idea?

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Old January 27th, 2014, 11:02 AM   #2
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Re: How did he get this shot?

Looks like at least a 3 ft slider.
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Old January 27th, 2014, 11:26 AM   #3
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Re: How did he get this shot?

Either a slider or a steadicam of some sort. Glidecam, Merlin or something similar.
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Old January 27th, 2014, 11:47 AM   #4
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Re: How did he get this shot?

how much is one of those?
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Old January 27th, 2014, 12:11 PM   #5
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Re: How did he get this shot?

A popular, professional choice would be the Pocket Dolly v2.0 from Kessler Crane. We use the original Pocket Dolly here at work. The v2.0 starts at $549 list.

Pocket Dolly v2.0

If you are handy, you can purchase some kitchen drawer sliders and build your own slider out of wood. That might cost $50 or so. I built one for home use, and while it works, it's definitely not as smooth as the Kessler. It's also not nearly as professional or easy to transport, for those going on paid jobs.

There are many other brands of slider and many other home-built approaches. You can also buy a motor and control for smooth slider shots during timelapses.

One thing to consider is how to support the thing. I recommend a good tripod on one end and a light stand on the other. If you use a tripod in the middle, you are likely to get some sag as the camera moves toward either end.
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Old January 27th, 2014, 07:59 PM   #6
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Re: How did he get this shot?

Hello again Brock!

Yes, that intro was definitely shot with a glider (also called sliders, or sometimes dollies), not a Steadicam, and not necessarily a very long one either. You can get that kind of shot from less than 2' of motion.

You can tell that it wan't a Steadicam because the throws are so short, so linear, and, (ironically) because it's so steady.

Cinevate makes good ones, and Edelkrone makes cheap and portable ones that look pretty cool, although I have seen some complaints about their v.1 online, so I would be careful. Here is a demo they did with their shortest slider: edelkrone sliderplus v2 small demo - YouTube
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Old January 28th, 2014, 02:29 AM   #7
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Re: How did he get this shot?

A dolly gets a similar shot, but its wheels are on the ground or on a track with a tripod or platform above. With a slider, the track is raised and the mechanism is much smaller and lighter, since it only has to support the camera.

Fisher Dolly is the gold standard - and overkill for most indie work:
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Old February 12th, 2014, 01:36 PM   #8
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Re: How did he get this shot?

Opteka makes some very affordable sliders. You can get as complicated as you like, or keep it simple and mount your cam directly on the slider.


Here's a little DOF test I did one minute after unboxing my Opteka slider:
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Old February 17th, 2014, 01:22 PM   #9
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Re: How did he get this shot?

Nice videos Casey.

Do you still feel the same way about the Opteka slider? You still feel like it would be a good purchase for someone starting out like me?
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Old February 17th, 2014, 09:09 PM   #10
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Re: How did he get this shot?

Yes, having a small slider like this is invaluable. The 47" is great, but a shorter slider might be even better, as swinging around a long piece of aluminum indoors can be cumbersome. I'd definitely recommend the Opteka for the price.
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Old February 21st, 2014, 09:43 PM   #11
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Re: How did he get this shot?

Sliders are an invaluable tool. Just remember to buy quality the first time. I bought the Konova the first time and was totally unhappy with it. So the second time around I went with Kessler. Best decision I ever made.
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Old February 23rd, 2014, 01:01 AM   #12
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Re: How did he get this shot?

Even with a Kessler, it's hard to get that perfect shot. I have a 1st gen Pocket Dolly and even when pulling a string wrapped around the wheel, the movement isn't precise - not due to the slider but due to my ability to be smooth. Also, you need to have good support on both ends. Use inadequate support and the shot will droop at the end. Add a less-than-smooth slider to the equation and your moves will always be jumpy.

So yeah, you need good support, a good quality slider, and good technique - if not a motor drive.

At the other end of the spectrum, with a smooth surface, wax paper, and a towel, one can fake a slider move in the wild - if you can control the thing and are willing to do enough takes. :)
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Old February 23rd, 2014, 09:31 PM   #13
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Re: How did he get this shot?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Fairhurst View Post
Even with a Kessler, it's hard to get that perfect shot.
We get perfect smooth shot all the time with Kessler... and warp stabilizer.
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Old February 24th, 2014, 11:54 AM   #14
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Re: How did he get this shot?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Victor Nguyen View Post
We get perfect smooth shot all the time with Kessler... and warp stabilizer.
I don't usually have an issue with shake. (Isn't that what Warp Stabilizer fixes?) My challenge is to get a smooth start, constant speed, and a controlled stop. It's not the equipment. It's me - the human element. I guess a large flywheel could help.

Then again, we're spoiled with computer-perfect camera motion from 3D rendered content. Just yesterday, I watched Lawrence Olivier's Hamlet (1948), which won four academy awards (Best Picture; Best Actor in a Leading Role; Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black-and-White; Best Costume Design, Black-and-White).

Hamlet (1948) - IMDb

The direction included huge, aggressive camera moves above and through the castle. Many of the moves were clunky. And this would have been with the very best camera cranes and dollies available in England at the time. But audiences back then had never seen a Pixar camera move. We have different expectations today.

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