Stabilizer for EX1 for trekking/hiking documentary at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Stabilizers (Steadicam etc.)


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old July 21st, 2008, 06:41 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 132
Stabilizer for EX1 for trekking/hiking documentary

I've looked around without any definitive suggestions.

I need a stabilizer for a documentary I am working on. Alot of operating will be done shooting kids as they are hiking.

I need:

1)something that is available now
2)something that I don't have to worry about slipping a disc
3)something that will give me relatively smooth footage

Is that vague enough?

Most are dayhikes, but we will have one 4 day camping excursion that we will be led by a trekking team on a moderate to difficult hikes.

What is the lowest-cost solution for the ex1 for this sort of operation?

Anybody been hiking with the EX1? Any suggestions? Thanks.
James Klatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 21st, 2008, 08:08 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 591
risky flying on trails with a vest/arm/pilot. I would think a fig rig would be a good fit for an environ like trails.
Christopher Witz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 21st, 2008, 09:36 PM   #3
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Makati, Metro Manila
Posts: 2,706
Images: 32
If you're really hiking, I think the monopod is the most useful stabilizer. It's my preferred stabilizer if I'm doing any sort of walking in the wild parts of the world. A basic monopod like the Bogen / Manfrotto 558B Video Monopod is easy to store, carry, and fast to setup. Doubles as a walking stick or you can strap it to your back pack. I like that particular monopod because the matching quick release adapter is relatively cheap.

When walking I usually:
A. collapse the monopod to it's minimum height and sling the shoulder strap over my shoulders
B. or I carry the whole rig by the handle of the camera
C. or put the lens of the camera over my shoulder like a baby.
__________________
"Ultimately, the most extraordinary thing, in a frame, is a human being." - Martin Scorsese
Michael Wisniewski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 21st, 2008, 09:39 PM   #4
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Makati, Metro Manila
Posts: 2,706
Images: 32
Forgot to mention the 558B monopod has a rubber shoe on the bottom if you need to grip a surface, the shoe un-screws to reveal the metal spike if you want to plant it more firmly. The rubber shoe also lets you do rudimentary-freehand tilts and pans.
__________________
"Ultimately, the most extraordinary thing, in a frame, is a human being." - Martin Scorsese
Michael Wisniewski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 21st, 2008, 10:48 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 276
Another vote for monopods.

I have been using monopods for weddings etc for nearly 13 years (since the first small digital cameras first came out) and find the latest manfrotto excellent to use.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...od_Deluxe.html

cheers Vaughan
Vaughan Wood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 21st, 2008, 11:20 PM   #6
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 1,684
Another vote for monopod. Despite all you read here I find it superior to shoulder rigs.

I think i use a 550B, with a bogen 3232 tilt head - The tilt head is essential. Then tuck it in a fanny pack around the waist. Very flexible and easy on the body.

Only a stabilizer will give you a floating motion while walking though, but I think it would be very dangerous on a trail.

Lenny
Leonard Levy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 22nd, 2008, 04:57 AM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: London UK
Posts: 101
Is it worth going for a Fluid Monopod like the Manfrotto 562B?
John Gilmore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 22nd, 2008, 05:46 AM   #8
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Poland
Posts: 4,086
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Gilmore View Post
Is it worth going for a Fluid Monopod like the Manfrotto 562B?
John,

I'd go for the 561b, which has the pan head in the base, and the tilt head (simplified 701) at the top:

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthread.php?t=97716

I've recorded a live music performance using it lately; quite stable picture I'd say:

http://www.vimeo.com/1380497
__________________
Sony PXW-FS7 | DaVinci Resolve Studio; Magix Vegas Pro; i7-5960X CPU; 64 GB RAM; 2x GTX 1080 8GB GPU; Decklink 4K Extreme 12G; 4x 3TB WD Black in RAID 0; 1TB M.2 NVMe cache drive
Piotr Wozniacki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 22nd, 2008, 10:23 AM   #9
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 132
Thanks for all the helpful replies!! :)

I am still shaping my plan. I live in Portland, Oregon and all the shooting that I will be doing for this production will all be only a couple hours away whenever we do a hike. The idea of using only a monopod and maybe a shoulder attachment seems much more streamlined, which is less stressful.

I am still thinking about this...
James Klatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 22nd, 2008, 12:25 PM   #10
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: California
Posts: 230
I definitely want the floating sensation from a stabilizer... my search continues.
Buck Forester is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 22nd, 2008, 06:02 PM   #11
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buck Forester View Post
I definitely want the floating sensation from a stabilizer... my search continues.
The Merlin is amazing, but I have heard that the ex1 is too heavy for it.

What about the dvrig or dvrig pro?

Would this be too cumbersome for hiking?
James Klatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 22nd, 2008, 07:19 PM   #12
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: melb.vic.au
Posts: 447
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buck Forester View Post
I definitely want the floating sensation from a stabilizer... my search continues.
You can use a monopod for this too, you just shorten it and use your arm. Possibly add some weight to the bottom to help. Works pretty well for short periods, depending on your strength. The added bonus is the pointy end remains at the ready, for fighting off bears and German backpackers!

Other than that, for the full floater you'd have to go a steadicam merlin, arm and vest at the least, probably a pilot. That would start to get pretty unwieldy on a long hike.
David C. Williams is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 22nd, 2008, 07:32 PM   #13
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,414
Another cool thing to do when using a monopod for hiking and such is to turn the monopod
upside down with the camera attached and shoot footage at low angles around your feet...

yes the footage is upside down.. you just flip in your NLE... adds a nice touch...

and just the opposite... you can use the monopod as a short camera boom too...
Ray Bell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 22nd, 2008, 07:52 PM   #14
Trustee
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Coronado Island
Posts: 1,452
I would also vote for the 561b monopod.
For all terrain run n' gun shooting it's the best solution I have found for an EX size camera. Used as designed, with a little practice, you can get almost the stability of a tripod. With it attached but collapsed, it provides enough counterbalence to smooth out moving shots- better than I can do normal handheld anyway. You can leave it attached, hang on to the pod with one hand, cam over your shoulder, and easily move on to the next setup.
I have been disappointed with shoulder mounts: the real simple ones don't seem to be all that stable, and the stable ones seem more cumbersome & complicated than I want to deal with for "off road" shooting.
__________________
Bob
Robert Young is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 22nd, 2008, 09:44 PM   #15
Major Player
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Beijing
Posts: 665
I use a Velbon Pro pod 8 http://www.velbon.co.uk/newvelbon/pages/monopods.html

Its absolutely the best video monopod I've ever used (and I've used a lot of Manfrotto and Gitzos) and cleverly converts to a handheld stabilizer by putting the foot into a provided belt loop and then turning the carry strap into a neck strap. Kind of hard to visualise and their website doesn't help but it works. It is helped more with a small pan head and quick release system on top of the monopod.

I think it as also available as a Miller monopod http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...bon_Fiber.html

I also use the el cheapo stabilizer popular elsewhere on this board.
Dan Chung is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Stabilizers (Steadicam etc.)

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:59 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network