Steadicam Jr. or Glidecam 2000 PRO ? at DVinfo.net

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Old April 17th, 2002, 04:38 PM   #1
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Steadicam Jr. or Glidecam 2000 PRO ?

Steadicam Jr. or Glidecam 2000 PRO ?

Pros, cons & compariosns?

Anyone?
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Old April 17th, 2002, 08:53 PM   #2
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One of our community members here is Casey Visco, who works at Glidecam. Maybe he'll have some input. I think Steadicam rules the roost on the big professional gear, but the Jr. is... well, I don't know... better let others make their own opinions known.
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Old April 17th, 2002, 09:23 PM   #3
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Hi,

I use a glidecam V-8 and it's about perfect for me. The added weight of batteries, XLR adapters, Wireless receivers and mattebox push the limits of smaller systems. The down side is the added size and weight of the glidecam. However, my arm, shoulder and legs are much less fatigued with the V-8 than when I've had to use smaller units. The rewards are that my shots are what the clients are looking for and I did it in one or two takes.

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Old April 17th, 2002, 09:25 PM   #4
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I used the JR with the Sony VX1000 and that was tipping the scale on the heavy side. The rig worked well and I shot a lot of footage with it. It was comfortable enough to shoot for about 6 hours straight. You can't really use it with any camera heavier than that.

I haven't tried any of the Glidecam products so someone else should chime in.
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Old April 17th, 2002, 09:46 PM   #5
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Alright, I'll chime in then. Kudo...it really comes down to the weight of the intended camera. And naturally, the heavier the camera, the heavier the "sled" and the greater the fatigue. It's sort of a relative thing.

Sadly, I have not gotten my hands yet on a Steadicam Jr to do a comparison, so I may not be very helpful on this one, but I have heard both bad and good reviews on it. The only advice I can personally offer in this regard is, do not overload the rig. Always make sure your camera (with tape, batteries and all accesories loaded) is _under_ the intended weight capacity of the rig.
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Old April 18th, 2002, 05:33 AM   #6
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For what it's worth, I have a Steadicam J.R. that I bought 10 or so years ago. I have shot a LOT of footage on it, almost all of it with the Canon AII. (I think that was the model? It was the Hi8 camera before the L1 came out.) Anyway, that camera tipped the 4 pound limit by a pound and it did make shooting a bit more fatiguing and I had to be more careful with how I handled the unit, but you would be amazed at just how easy the unit is to work with once you've gotten used to it. The biggest thing is getting the controls tweeked for a specific camera. Once you get that "sweet spot", you can shoot for hours with only tiny tweeks that you can even do DURING shots.

I have not used the glidecam, so I guess this post doesn't help too much for a comparison either.
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Old April 18th, 2002, 07:55 AM   #7
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Brad, that's the Canon A1 Digital you are referring to. Though nothing was digital about it except the lame built-in camera effects. Not really a small camera, but not as bis as the L1, either.
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Old April 18th, 2002, 10:14 AM   #8
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Cont.

Wel, thank u all for your input.

When I asked the question I was refering to PD-150 or PD-100a or any other similar camcorder weighting less than 4 lbs. loaded.

Now, am i correct 2 assume that Steadicam Jr. comes with included viewing monitor while it's Glidecam counterpart 2000 PRO does not?

So, how's that monitor helpful or does it make much difference?

And Casey do u work in engineering or pruduction for them or sales?
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Old April 18th, 2002, 02:01 PM   #9
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Kudo...

The 2000 Pro does not come with an on board monitor, although they can easily be attached. If you're camcorder has a flip-out lcd screen on it, chances are you can get away without having an extra monitor. Otherwise, a small lcd is needed to compose your shot.

And I work in the production department for Glidecam.
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Old April 18th, 2002, 02:20 PM   #10
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Sorry for missing that. Ok, if you have a Steadicam J.R. and a camera that is under 4 pounds *loaded*, then the J.R. is VERY easy to work with. I remember using a friend's 8mm camera on it for one shoot and I kept saying to myself "this couldn't be easier".

Also, yes that monitor is a MUST. If the Glidecam doesn't come with one, definitely purchase one with the unit should you decide to go with Glidecam.
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Old April 18th, 2002, 02:27 PM   #11
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Brad thanks for your answer.

But, how important is for me to have the outside lcd if I already have it as a camcorder flip out, provided I'm using auto focus for getting those shots?

And Casey,

do u have anything to say about the following opinion from unhappy "user":

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

posted 4/17/2002 01:30 PM PDT

Run, run like the wind from the cheaper Glidecam products. We've tried a couple, and thank god B&H's return policy allowed us to bail.

For the price and assuming you're using a small camera, the Steadicam Jr is great. Yes, it required lots of patient practice. But for the price? It's a steal.

NOTE: The Steadicam DV (is it even still around?) is a pale, pale imitation of the JR.
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Old April 18th, 2002, 02:31 PM   #12
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kudo, unfortunately i dont have anything to say to that, no reason was given for this persons unhappiness with the product.

And on the flip out issue: if your shooting with the camera at such an angle that the flip-out is just out of view, you might not be getting what you think you are. An onboard monitor is designed to be viewable from either side of the rig, so you can always keep an eye on your shot.
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Old April 18th, 2002, 02:44 PM   #13
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An onboard monitor which 2000 PRO does not have!?

So why is that? How come Steadi Jr. has it and u guys don't?
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Old April 18th, 2002, 02:57 PM   #14
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Casey's point is a good one. Since most cameras have the flip-out screen on the left side of the body, any significant pan to the right would obscure the monitor from view. I would add another argument for an onboard monitor; a very real benefit of having the monitor lower on the rig is so that you can see where your feet are going in your peripheral vision. The very early (circa 1975) Steadicam had a top mounted monitor but that was moved down below where it remains to this day.

And to further confuse the issue, Tiffen is or will be soon offering a (presumably cheaper) version of the JR without monitor, for those who prefer to use the flip-out screen on their camera. So it comes full circle!

Casey, say hey to Tom for me. That'd be wicked pissah!
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Old April 18th, 2002, 03:01 PM   #15
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steadichupap's got it right. Having that monitor keeps you from stumbling and breaking your J.R. and your camera! Also, in bright daylight, you may not be able to see your camera's flip out monitor, and of course you wouldn't be able to pan to the other side of the camera and see what you are doing. Once you get your hands on one of them, you will come up with an amazing number of examples as to why you WON'T want to just shoot walking straight ahead, which is just about what using the built in monitor will force you to do.
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