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Old July 11th, 2004, 03:37 PM   #16
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gee, I feel like a big spoilsport, but that particular SRII body in the pictures isn't equipped with a video tap, so there wouldn't be any image on the monitor...! Nice looking rig though, very clean sled.

That's actually the same camera that I flew on my first film job (with tap, however!), somewhere around '87.

Good luck with your project, Simon!
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Old July 11th, 2004, 04:03 PM   #17
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Well Charles P. , he did ask for a HB rig flying a film camera, so I showed him, regardless if it doesn't have a video tap. It's still prove that he's flying it on a HB rig ;)

BTW, how's your project coming along? I'm waiting with my credit card in my hand for that long awaited training video :)
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Old July 12th, 2004, 03:10 AM   #18
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For sure, it's a film camera. Like I said, I was just being a spoilsport--or should I say, wiseass.

Well, I was about to go into production but I got sidetracked into shooting a short film starting next weekend. Hopefully after that wraps I'll be able to get back into that darn video. It really is elusive!

One nice thing is that I will be borrowing a Tiffen Flyer to audition on this short film, so that I can assess its viability as a serious production tool. We are going to be using a DVX100 with a Mini35 and Zeiss speeds on it. I'll be posting some thoughts on the rig when the dust settles. I'm keeping the PRO in the closet for this shoot if I possibly can!
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Old July 12th, 2004, 03:38 AM   #19
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ooooh yessss, baby. Now you're talking. Keep us updated.
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Old July 12th, 2004, 08:42 AM   #20
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"Dan I'm wondering how everyone says it is quite a difficult thing
to do (especially if you want to make a GOOD rig)".

Well, let me see...first, the rig in "Killer camera rigs" is similar to the Glidecam 4000, with one important difference: the handle has bearings to isolate wrist movement. So It's a handheld unit. Much easier to make. The version with the vest, and double arm is going to be in volume II. It will incorporate the best parts of the professional Steadicam and the Basson (a great stabilizer out of Brazil). Frankly, I think the thing that makes it easy to build is the vast amount of photos and step-by-step instructions in the book. I'm not sure how many photos I have for the stabilizer alone, but for the 11 different rigs in total there are over 1,300 photos. I also designed the rigs with materials that are pretty available--which was the hardest part about writing the book. So with some guidance, these things ARE easy to build. Having said that, the Vest/Arm version will be more difficult, but if you can follow instructions...

Also, the most valuble experience I had while writing "Killer Camera Rigs" was that I taught rig building at the USC summer film program. I could see first hand what wasn't clear or what the students were having trouble with, and fix it.

You can see the rig on the website, as well as quicktime movies, reviews, and praise from builders who've made some of the rigs.

all my best,

Dan
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Old July 12th, 2004, 08:50 AM   #21
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Heja! (for the Svenska)
Or Hi there.,
Soooo, what is the cost difference for building a full vest-system yourself?
How much will the materials cost? Range$?

I'm considering it myself after having good luck building a jib. But my time is precious as well. Info appreciated.
Thanks,

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Old July 12th, 2004, 12:05 PM   #22
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Thank you for your explenation Dan. I didn't know you where
the author of Killer camera rigs. Welcome aboard! <g>
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Old July 16th, 2004, 01:08 PM   #23
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I made my own steadicam (like glidecam)

http://web.axelero.hu/prechj/pics/steadi1.jpg
http://web.axelero.hu/prechj/pics/steadi2.jpg
http://web.axelero.hu/prechj/pics/steadi3.jpg
http://web.axelero.hu/prechj/pics/steadi4.jpg

The result is good. But not enough for me..
Should i make an arm brace? It's already heavy.

If i run with my cam the video look better than if just walking.
Interesting.

Any tips to make better my steadicam? :)
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Old July 17th, 2004, 10:58 AM   #24
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Hi Prech,

You can cut down on some of the weight by shortening the counter balance. It doesn't need to be so long. Also, if you make it out of aluminum instead of wood, it will be quite a bit lighter as well. Nice job all around though! If you want to have a wrist support, try using a medical wrist wrap (the velcro kind that someone with a spranged wrist might wear) you can find at any drug store. Get one that has removeable plastic splints. This will help alot. In my book, I also recommend getting a tai chi video and learning some of the basics. I picked up this trick from a friend of mine, Kris Malkiewicz (he wrote the filmmaking classic "cinematograpy" and "film lighting") who is a human steadicam. The Tai Chi moves are excellent when working with a stabilizer. Also, work with the rig everyday. Start with 5 minutes, and add time as you grow stronger. These things take practice!

Dan
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Old July 18th, 2004, 04:37 AM   #25
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I just think, if the wood is longer, it's harder to pan the cam.
More force is needed. Am i wrong?

My only problem now is that ball-bearing is only help for stabilizing the panning. But not enough for tilting/rolling.
I think, it's normal. For the panning, more ball are moving in bearing, and thus the contact with my arm is more fluent.


Anyway, thank you for the tips!
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Old July 18th, 2004, 06:30 AM   #26
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Volume II

Hey Dan,

I've checked out your website on many occasions in the past, but didn't order the book until today. I am wondering...when will volume II be available? What other camera rigs will be in volume II?
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Old July 18th, 2004, 08:36 AM   #27
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Prech:

You are essentially correct--the principle here is that the further the weights are from the center of gravity, the greater the inertia, which results in more stability. Having the weights live further out in the horizontal axis means greater inertia in pan; by having them arranged as you have, you are also adding inertia in the tilt axis. If the base was rotated 90 degrees, it would add inertia in the roll axis, but it might interfere with your body.

As far as your bearing, yes, you need to build out your gimbal with bearings for tilt and roll to really achieve isolation in all three axes.
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Old July 18th, 2004, 08:48 AM   #28
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Hey! My bearing is a special one.
Check the picture again.
It can rotate in all 3 axis.
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Old July 18th, 2004, 09:34 AM   #29
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"I've checked out your website on many occasions in the past, but didn't order the book until today. I am wondering...when will volume II be available? What other camera rigs will be in volume II?"

Hi Ramon,

First, Thanks so much for your order! I'm hoping to have volume II ready for press by the end of the year. It will mostly focus on building your own lighting, but there will be some rigs: a new stabilizer with a vest/arm. Currently I'm having trouble mimicing the iso arm of the steadicam, but it's a problem I'm intent on solving! There will also be a large dolly with wheels that can crab, a sound boom with a mic shock mount, a different kind of car mount than in volume I, and a motorized pan/tilt head for the cranes. And who knows what else! It seems to keep growing. Another monster!

Dan
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Old July 18th, 2004, 07:17 PM   #30
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Prech, yes, I saw that your bearing has some movement in tilt and roll, although it looks like it tops out at about 15 degrees or so. I could see that under the best of circumstances it could trim out some simple axial deviation, but:

My main curiousity is how you are using it. The padded grip above the gimbal makes me think you are holding on to the rig up there, but how are you holding the gimbal itself? It's an unusual setup you have there, to be sure.
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