Who all has built a homebuilt steadycam? - Page 4 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Stabilizers (Steadicam etc.)


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old August 10th, 2004, 08:24 AM   #46
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 6,781
That's 55 lbs, and that's indeed impressive! I assume you mean the lifting capacity of his arm, meaning camera+rig...? That means he can fly the lighter 35mm cameras such as the Moviecam SL/ARRICAM LT etc., or a stock Varicam or Cinealta. I see he has a wireless follow focus too--THAT'S not a homebuild item (unless you are Jim Bartell, of BFD fame).

Overall a really professional looking setup. I think my only note for that gent would be...cable management!
__________________
Charles Papert
www.charlespapert.com
Charles Papert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 10th, 2004, 08:34 AM   #47
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: sweden
Posts: 795
Right Charles P. I did mean the arm capacity. Well, I think the focus is the real thing but I'm just referring to the stabilizer in general. Not bad. I'll put a complete setup in the gallery on HBS when I get more pics and info.
__________________
Charles
'What we perceive to be may not be what we believe to be.'
Charles King is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 10th, 2004, 08:52 AM   #48
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 6,781
Eh, sorry Charles, didn't mean to sound like I was nitpicking on the follow focus. I think I meant to say that if someone followed through with the homebuild philosophy right through the follow focus setup, that really would be something! (come to think of it, it has been done in the past, with modified RC controls, Jimmy Jib motors, etc.)
__________________
Charles Papert
www.charlespapert.com
Charles Papert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 10th, 2004, 10:16 AM   #49
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: sweden
Posts: 795
It's okay C.P. :) We all tend to dive off the deep end at times.
__________________
Charles
'What we perceive to be may not be what we believe to be.'
Charles King is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 13th, 2004, 02:50 PM   #50
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Visalia, California
Posts: 41
I have built the Stablizer from Dan's book.

Dan has done a great job. The stablizer has made a difference and has given me more options to choose from while shooting. Thank You, I can't wait for Volume Two, count one copy already sold.
Adam Beck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 16th, 2004, 03:11 AM   #51
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Taipei, Taiwan
Posts: 159
I can't find proper gimbals here in Taiwan, but I have found a couple of other things that might stand in. We're building a tilted L-shaped device and were planning to use either the wheel from a cart with a handle welded onto the wheel (the wheel turns and also swivels, providing two directions of mobility). I'm thinking I might get a swivelling handle as well, but I'm not sure if that would work or not.

The other option would be to use a universal joint, which I know where to find and buy, for the handle below the camera. Essentially the functions are the same as a gimbal, but unlike the cart wheel, the joint has the two directions swivelling from the same point rather than being seperated. The cart wheel has bearings, though. Which sounds like a better design? Would I be better off with a ball joint?

Glidecams here are all imported and prohibitively expensive, btw.
Tao-ming Lin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 16th, 2004, 02:31 PM   #52
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 220
Tao-ming lin,
Are you looking at creating a large device, because the homemade gimbal from the inline skate wheel sounds like the direction you're heading towards.
It provides the two axis of movement and can incorporate a swivel handle. Dan's plans cover this. See if he can ship internationally.
Also see if he will send you just the parts list first for the stabilizer to make sure you can get the parts locally. I bet he would. That way you don't have to buy the book and pay for shipping only to discover that you can't buy any materials that you need.

You can reach him at www.dvcamerarigs.com

Again, I don't get a kick back, just awfully pleased with the product and service.
Reid Bailey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 16th, 2004, 09:21 PM   #53
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Taipei, Taiwan
Posts: 159
I only need something big enough to support a Panny DVX100, possibly with accessories but not many. The shopping cart wheel we have might work, or a universal joint might work as well. I'm not sure which to go with, as the prices for the welding involved makes it about the same. We have the stabilizer parts, basically a couple of aluminium pieces put together in a Steadicam Jr. configuration type thing. It all hinges around the gimbal and what we use to balance the handle.
Tao-ming Lin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2004, 08:25 AM   #54
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 220
It sounds like Dan's plans would do the trick for the dvx100. Actually I'm sure of it. I just used the dvx on a shoot and the director bought a Glidecam which was virtually identical to my homemade rig.

The central part is the gimbal made from an inline skate wheel that you can totally make yourself with a drill and some screws and epoxy.

Whichever model you go with it's going to get heavy so I would recommend short shots. And maybe a wrist splint, those sports type things, to alleviate some of the strain.

Oh btw, if I hadn't gone through Dan's instructions first I never would have been able to balance the fancy glidecam one. The glidecam instructions were without a doubt the worst set of instructions I have ever seen for any piece of equipment period.
Reid Bailey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2004, 05:30 PM   #55
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: New York
Posts: 17
Jean-Philippe Archibald, I really like your arm. Pretty impressive. If you all havn't seen it check out the link on the HBS forum under members systems.

One question. Your system was in the gallery under systems but I assume you did not follow cody's arm plan. Regardless, it's a nice looking arm.

Jean-Philippe, when will you be done?
__________________
Simon Wilks
Simon Wilks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2004, 05:36 PM   #56
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: sweden
Posts: 33
Just checked it out. Wow!, nice! How many springs will you be using? Congrats Jean.
__________________
Lars
Lars Gustav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2004, 08:09 PM   #57
Trustee
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Saguenay, Québec, Canada
Posts: 1,051
Hey guys, thank you for your kind words! I havn't finish it yet and I receive plenty of comments! That's really cool!

Simon: You know, I am working on it on my spare time, and I only have access to the machine shop a few hours / week. But the hardest work is done now, I should have the time to finish the arm this week. I think the vest will be easier to do.

Lars: each arm section will have two springs.

For those of you who would like to take a look to the pictures: http://sunens.uqac.ca/~jparchib/stab
__________________
Jean-Philippe Archibald
http://www.jparchibald.com - http://www.vimeo.com/jparchib
Jean-Philippe Archibald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2004, 08:57 PM   #58
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: New York
Posts: 17
Curious. How are you going to attach the second spring? Is it going to the other end of the arm?

It seems the homebuilt genre is really picking up. With Charles's K. new base module and your arm, boy! I better start building something of my own. :)
__________________
Simon Wilks
Simon Wilks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 6th, 2004, 11:20 AM   #59
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 220
I just want to congratulate you on the find job you did with this stabilizer. Are you going to copy the iso-elastic arm that is an important part of the new steadicams? Since you've gone this far, it might be worth the extra trouble.

dan
www.DVcameraRigs.com
Dan Selakovich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2004, 11:49 AM   #60
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Taipei, Taiwan
Posts: 159
It looks like the universal joint will do the trick. For more info, see

http://www.poagao.com/2004/09/it-lives-kind-of.html
Tao-ming Lin is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Stabilizers (Steadicam etc.)

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:43 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network