How do you handle audio when Flying your Sled? at DVinfo.net

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Old August 11th, 2004, 02:20 PM   #1
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How do you handle audio when Flying your Sled?

I use a really thin xlr cable to a mixer that I keep on my belt clip...my boom operator then plugs in to the mixer...This does effect balance a bit, but it the best solution i have found...Anyone know if there is a wireless solution that can enable my shotgun mic to go wireless...I was looking at the Sennheiser EW100 series, which is a possibility, but not really sure...What your u guys using for audio setups on your Rig?
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Old August 11th, 2004, 05:04 PM   #2
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Going wireless is best option you can have on rig. I'm always affraid to mess with cables while walking. Anyway, Sen100 seems to be very good price/performance solution. If you need video out there are some affordable wireles video monitoring solutions, and that can be really useful sometimes.
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Old August 11th, 2004, 07:28 PM   #3
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There's no question that cables are an annoyance. I just finished 4 days on some ABC promos that required me to imitate very slow dolly moves, rotating around something like 26 different ABC actors. How slow? I covered anywhere from 4 to 8 feet laterally in 15 to 30 seconds. Try that sometime--it's a real challenge! The slowest stuff is the hardest (especially with plenty of verticals and horizontals in the frame, and the talent not moving, all of which was the case with these).

And what further compounds the difficulty is the addition of cables. I had an SDX900 onboard and was trailing an audio XLR, a BNC for monitoring (video transmission was a no-go because the DP wanted a full-res picture on the broadcast monitor) and a cable for the 6" LCD positioned above the lens as a teleprompter.

The real trick when such things are unavoidable is to position the cables in such a way that they have the least impact on the rig as you move. I like to wrap them so that they all exit the rig together at a point just before or after the gimbal, then they make a good-size loop (2/3 the length of the post) and then fasten onto my vest at the shoulder. I then send them over my shoulder where they safety onto the back of the vest, and then on to a cable puller.

This way, the loop tends to minimize the torque than even a skinny cable can have on the system.
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