OIS on or off when using a video stabilizer? at DVinfo.net

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Old August 26th, 2009, 07:19 PM   #1
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OIS on or off when using a video stabilizer?

When people are using their video stabilizer support, do they turn off the OIS or keep it on?

I have heard mixed answers before and I am trying to figure out what would be the best option. I heard it is better to turn it off for pans.

thanks,

Simon
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Old August 26th, 2009, 08:19 PM   #2
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Turn it off. Theoretically it might help if you are doing, say, a running shot where jitter is introduced by the stabilizer and you aren't panning, but nearly every shot involves some sort of pan and as you have heard, OIS plays havoc with that on a stabilizer. Safer just to turn it off.
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Old August 26th, 2009, 09:14 PM   #3
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That is what I thought.

Do you use a video stabilizer and if so which one?

I heard from this forum that this one is pretty good :

VariZoom | VZMEDIARIG DV Media Rig | VZ-DV MEDIA RIG | B&H Photo

Not cheap though. But I guess the good ones are never cheap.

Simon
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Old August 26th, 2009, 09:24 PM   #4
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Google Spiderbrace. Last I checked theyre about $80. Made out of painted PVC but quite servicable for basic no-frills stabilizing. I have one for my HVX200 and it's a great low-cost solution.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Zimmer View Post
That is what I thought.

Do you use a video stabilizer and if so which one?

I heard from this forum that this one is pretty good :

VariZoom | VZMEDIARIG DV Media Rig | VZ-DV MEDIA RIG | B&H Photo

Not cheap though. But I guess the good ones are never cheap.

Simon
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Old August 26th, 2009, 09:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Zimmer View Post
Do you use a video stabilizer and if so which one?
Yeah, I guess you could say I use a stabilizer from time to time...!

(see link in my signature...)

OK, after seeing which unit you are referring to, we should probably qualify here. "Stabilizer" is generally used to indicate a mechanical device that isolates the operator's motions from the camera via a gimbal, and sometimes support arm and vest. What you linked to is variably called a shoulder mount, shoulder support, camera support etc. For example, check the Varizoom site (Varizoom.com) as they show just this delineation in the menu at left: "Camera Stabilization Systems" and "Camera Support Systems"

Back to the shoulder support you linked to; you could conceivably leave the OIS on when using this type of mount, as it is a passive system that is still considered handheld (vs the active stabilization of a Steadicam, a very different effect and operation).
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Old August 27th, 2009, 04:11 PM   #6
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Hi Charles,

After doing a bit more research, I see your point Charles.

I like the Glidecam 2000 Pro with Body Pod. Price seems reasonable at $450 too.

The steadicam pilot looks amazing but just too much money right now.

What do you think of the Glidecam 2000 Pro with Body Pod?

Thanks Mark for the cheaper solution. I will look at that too.

Simon
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Old August 27th, 2009, 10:01 PM   #7
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Mmmm...to me this is a bit of a jumbled concept. The concept behind the handheld stabilizers such as the Glidecam 2000 is that you hold it in your hand, allowing your arm to pretty effectively isolate the rig from footsteps and various body lurches and leans, while the gimbal isolates the angular axis of pan, tilt and roll. Many find the handheld rigs punishing to operate for any real length of time, which is why there are arm and vest systems that distribute the weight (in Glidecam's case, the Smooth Shooter or X10). The body pod eliminates the fatigue but doesn't isolate the operator's body from the rig, so your footsteps will likely "leak through" to the frame. I think it's sort of an odd stopgap myself.

It takes much more practice to properly operate a gimbaled stabilizer than a handheld or shoulder-mounted support like the Varizoom you linked to, which are generally pretty intuitive. I'm not really convinced that it's worth having to go through that learning curve unless you can actually walk, run etc with the rig and have it perform the "magic act" of beautifully stabilizing the footage, which the body pod will likely fall short of.

So what is your goal with your purchase, Simon? Producing Steadicam type footage, or achieving steadier handheld?
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Old August 28th, 2009, 09:18 AM   #8
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Hi Charles,

Thanks for taking the time to help me. I need it. ;)

I just recently upgraded from a hv20 to a hmc-150. I quickly noticed it is much harder to film steady footage while using the camcorder as a hand held. I do have a tripod but in general unless filming interviews, I don't find it very good when you need to improvise and film on the go. Also I prefer to film hand held. Just feels more comfortable for me.

So I guess I would like to achieve smoother and steadier handheld footage first of all. However, I also would like to be able to film smoother footage when walking too though I would say that is less of a priority.

Budget-wise I can't afford the Glidecam with the X10 kit yet. It is just too expensive though it looks very impressive.

The MultiRig Pro sounds interesting though at $485 it is not cheap either. The Steadybrace is very affordable but seems more like a temporary solution than a long term solution.

Any guidance would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Simon
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Old August 28th, 2009, 09:40 AM   #9
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I've been using a Multirig for a few years with small form factor cameras and I have to say that the rig is a great addition to any setup. It allows me to not have to use a tripod in crowded spaces and still keep very steady and with some practice, I can achieve some very nice moving shots as well. It in no way replaces a steadicam but it really does make a difference. IMO well worth the cash outlay.
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Old August 28th, 2009, 12:15 PM   #10
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Thanks Don.

Well, maybe that is the solution for now and when I get my bailout I can afford the glidecam with vest. ;)

Great forum!

Simon
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Old August 30th, 2009, 08:05 PM   #11
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Indicam Pilot Sled:

Okay, now after doing more research I really like the indicam Pilot.

But due to budget reasons I can't afford the whole system. But I could possibly afford just the Indicam Pilot Sled and get some practice until I can afford the vest and arm.

Anyone JUST using the Pilot Sled out there as a starter? I read some reviews and sounds just as good as Glidecam or Steadicam.

Simon
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Old August 31st, 2009, 02:16 AM   #12
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Interesting Simon, I thought you were prioritizing smoothing out your handheld stationary shots...?! FYI, these really are two separate things--handheld has its place, and stabilizers have theirs, and it's important to be able to cover both. I too would give the MultiRig Pro a thumbs up.

Regarding the Indicam, it's a good product made by good people. I wouldn't go so far as to say that it is as good as the Steadicam brand gear (i.e., the OTHER Pilot! Indicam actually used that name first), particularly the arm which uses a patented design that none of the other manufacturers can touch for smoothness and linearity. You can certainly achieve great shots with the Indicam though, and buying the sled first and seeeing whether or not you want to move up to the arm and vest is a good and cautious way to proceed. Stabilizers are not for everyone; you have to be prepared to put in a lot of practice unless you are not particularly critical about the results. Many get frustrated and give up on them. In comparison, there is very little learning curve with a handheld support like the Multirig.
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Old August 31st, 2009, 08:12 AM   #13
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Hi Charles!

It was but then I started reading more on what you can do with a stabilization system and watching demo footage (steadicam, glidecam and Indicam) I was quite impressed. And I could see the benefits for my future projects in many ways.

I emailed Terry who makes the indicam. I was hoping someone in Maryland might have a Indicam for me to look at and learn more. But getting the sled is a strong possibility now. I think it would be a good start.

I understand it will take a lot of practice but I am committed to doing the right thing to get me the best results.

I look at the multirig but at the end of the day it was JUST too much money for not solving the stabilization issue as well as I had hoped.

Thanks for your input as usual Charles.

Simon
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Old August 31st, 2009, 11:10 AM   #14
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Good! Let us know how you get on. I'm sure you'll have fun with the Indicam rig.
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Old August 31st, 2009, 12:51 PM   #15
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I will definitely post some updates when I finally get the sled and see what my experience is.

Simon
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