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Old October 25th, 2004, 03:44 AM   #1
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Flowpod or Glidecam

I have a dvx100a and I am looking for a stabilizer. Has anybody tried the Flowpod from Varizoom? I also have the opportunity to pick up a new Glidecam 4000 for an excellent price but I am wondering if the dvx100a is too lite for the 4000.
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Old October 25th, 2004, 09:41 AM   #2
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The Glidecam should work fine with your DVX100. But there is a flaw in their design in my humble opinion: the handle is static. I think it should be more like a steadicam handle on bearings. In the current design, your wrist movement isn't isolated, so you must keep the gimbal level. I'd try out the Flowpod before you decide.

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Old October 25th, 2004, 10:12 AM   #3
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Dan, the handle on the Glidecam is free to move and not static.


"The Glidecam 2000 Pro's offset handle grip is attached to a free floating, precision Gimbal, which allows your hand to move up and down, and side to side, thereby isolating your hands unwanted motions from the camera. The up and down movement alleviates the bouncing, pogo type action so often associated with our competitors system, because their handle cannot move up and down."

The handle attached to the gimbal is free to move virtually 360 in all directions.

The Glidecam is a better choice of the two, it allows more isolation and I think its the best handheld stabilizer out there.
On the other hand, it takes ages to master, and only then will you get the results you are looking for.
The Flowpod is easier to use, but in my opinion, it doesnít work as well as a Glidecam in the correct hands.

But like Dan suggests, you should try them both first.

http://www.glidecam.com/2000pro.html for more information on the 2000. The 4000 may be a better option for the DVX100.
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Old October 25th, 2004, 10:36 AM   #4
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That must be a new addition, as when I used the 4000, the handle was permanently and "unmovingly" attached to the gimbal bracket. Just out of curiousity, I took a look at the photo on there web site. Are you saying that now the handle moves back and forth on their bracket? (Not the bearing on the gimbal, but the handle itself.)

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Old October 25th, 2004, 10:44 AM   #5
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Yup, I'm sitting here playing with it now.....so to speak. :D

The pictures on the website are misleading, they make it look like it's fixed, but its not.

P.S I donít think itís too new, I've had mine for just over a year.
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Old October 25th, 2004, 11:04 AM   #6
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Dan, the 4000 pro has always had a full 3-axis gimbal...and it's actually an old product by now. I can only assume that you were perhaps using a 3000 pro (going waay back now)...which didnt have all of the bearings of the 4000.
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Old October 25th, 2004, 12:02 PM   #7
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Question for Casey Visco

Will the Glidecam 2000 pro handle the DVX100a with an external mic and the 4 hour battery or do I need the 4000 pro?
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Old October 25th, 2004, 12:32 PM   #8
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Dennis...the 2000 Pro will easily handle a DVX100a in it's out-of-the-box configuration. However, in your case, since I don't know the weight of the mic and battery, you'd have to weigh the camera package with the additional accessories on it, yourself. If it's 6 pounds or UNDER...the 2000 Pro can handle it. Any heavier than 6 pounds will push you into the 4000Pro range.
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Old October 25th, 2004, 12:38 PM   #9
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Another person is having trouble balancing a dvx100 on a 4000. I am wondering if the camera is too lite for the 4000. The stock dvx100a is 4.2 lbs.
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Old October 25th, 2004, 08:49 PM   #10
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"Dan, the 4000 pro has always had a full 3-axis gimbal...and it's actually an old product by now. I can only assume that you were perhaps using a 3000 pro (going waay back now)...which didnt have all of the bearings of the 4000."

I guess I stand corrected! I have been around awhile, so it could have been the 3000. I'll have to hoof it over to the rental house and take a look. Thank's for setting me straight.

dan
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Old October 26th, 2004, 12:18 AM   #11
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Glidecam vs. Flowpod

I own a number of handheld stabilizers from the Glidecam 1000 and 2000 to the Flyingpod and the Vreezecam. Each has it's own strengths and weaknesses IMHO. The nice thing about the Glidecams and the Vreezecam is the three-way axis isolation via a gimbal arangement. With the Flyingpod and other non-gimbal systems there is a tendency to have a back and forth movement in your shots when you walk because there isn't any isolation from your hand to the stabilizer.

The Flowpod does have a type of isolation like the Steadicam Jr. but there doesn't seem to be any way of counter balancing it using a bottom plate as it doesn't have one. It is a cool idea though and I like it's design for many type of shots.

If you are seeking a true steadycam type of shot you'll need a true steadycam type of set up. There are many fine systems out there including mine so do your homework and then practice, practice, practice.

Good luck!
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