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Old March 28th, 2005, 08:21 PM   #1
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Glidecam 4000pro help!

I recently purchased a glidecam 4000pro and am having difficulty using it. I'm pretty sure I balanced it properly but it seems to wobble when I walk. Is there a learning curve involved or am I just not using it properly.

Thanks
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Old March 28th, 2005, 09:32 PM   #2
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Maria:

A learning curve there is indeed. Try doing a search here under Glidecam, Steadicam etc...there's a lot of nuggets!

Number one tip is to hold the post VERY lightly with your fingertips. Easy does it.
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Old March 28th, 2005, 10:00 PM   #3
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You have to walk before you can glide. Get yourself a plastic cup, fill it to the top with water, and when you can walk around the house without spilling any you are halfway there. Ever seen Groucho Marx walk?
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Old March 30th, 2005, 11:46 PM   #4
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<<<-- Originally posted by John Galt : You have to walk before you can glide. Get yourself a plastic cup, fill it to the top with water, and when you can walk around the house without spilling any you are halfway there. Ever seen Groucho Marx walk? -->>>

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"Say the magic word and win a hundred dollas."

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Maria,

Indeed the glass full of water is a great way of learning to keep your hand steady while the rest of you is moving. Just make sure you aren't walking around spilling on something you're going to get in trouble for.

The most important thing to learn, past the walking, was mentioned by Master Papert. Keep the control hand (the one not holding up the Glidecam) touch light! This is much easier to do when the rig is balanced correctly. That should be in your instructions.

Say Charles, is your video going to cover this area of handheld units or just the full sized rigs? I know many of the same principles apply but I just thought I'ld ask.

Tery
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Old March 31st, 2005, 09:27 PM   #5
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Thanks for the reply guys, I didn't know I was in the prescence of master experts. I'm using a vx2100 on the glidecam and have added the wide angle lens which gives it more weight and seems to stable it a little.
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Old April 1st, 2005, 12:19 AM   #6
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Maria,

A wide angle lens is a good idea as it masks movement better. The only problem with it is you always have to keep an eye out for a good horizon (level). Take it from one who has to improve on this aspect of his own steadycam operation.

You'll learn that the two Charles' (Charles Papert and Charles King) are great contributors to this and other forums. Charles King is the "king" of Homebuilt Stabilizers while Charles Papert is a Steadicam Master with lots of movies and other productions to his credit.

Tery
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Old April 1st, 2005, 12:43 AM   #7
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Tery:

I will be covering both handheld and lightweight body-mounted rigs in the video. Most of the techniques are common between the two.
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Old April 1st, 2005, 03:15 AM   #8
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When is this video coming out? It seems like I have been hearing about it for years (decades?). :)
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Old April 1st, 2005, 10:02 AM   #9
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Yup, John, you got that right. Terry has embarked on a brilliant plan to get me to finally make the damn thing: he keeps bringing it up so that I can't conveniently forget about it!

Between major renovations to my house and a series of work commitments, I've had to keep postponing production on this. I want to make the thing right, not a sloppy quickie, and there is a good amount of pre-production necessary.

However, the script is written and the stage is set...I'm going to be re-kindling my talks with the various equipment manufacturers at NAB to borrow rigs for the shoot. And if the feature that I'm supposed to start after this one doesn't happen, I'll be putting the DVD project first in line.
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Old April 1st, 2005, 11:48 AM   #10
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I have run my VX2100 on my 2000 before. I am not picking any fights with you! ;) With the heavier rig, it may be easier to use fluidly, but the amount of time you can spend is a lot shorter. I am thinking of getting a Panasonic GS-400 or even a 200 as a light camera extends the time I can hold a hand-held. But... the light weight does make control a little more sensitive.

Hey, maybe we can get Chris Hurd to sticky a thread... "The Official 'Is it done yet Charles?' thread"... :D Charles, if you need any community help, let us know.
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Old April 1st, 2005, 01:04 PM   #11
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George,

"With the heavier rig, it may be easier to use fluidly, but the amount of time you can spend is a lot shorter."

An hence that's why I built the Indicam. I can use it with my DVX-100a all day long and that's with extra weight added. I'm no "spring chicken" but I do have fairly good lower back strength, which is where you feel it most with my type of rig.

Regarding Charles' training video...After reading his posts and suggestions (and saving them), I knew he needed to do his video. I figured if the video were as good the rest of his stuff I would r e a l l y benefit from it as would others.

I also plan on offering it on my web site as a great training tool to go along with my rig. As most of you proficient operators know, buying or making a rig is just the beginning. For example, I'll bet Charles will cover what I goofed up on during my last 2 hr steadycam shoot. I found my shadow showing up due to low spotlight use. I was circling some dancers who were lite by four spotlights at opposites to each other. I should have known better but this is the first time I have shot in this type of environment. (Middle of a gym)

I don't know about the rest of you guys (and girls) but I don't like learning the hard way. PLEASE HURRY Charles!

Tery
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Old April 1st, 2005, 01:50 PM   #12
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<<<-- Originally posted by Charles Papert : Yup, John, you got that right. Terry has embarked on a brilliant plan to get me to finally make the damn thing: he keeps bringing it up so that I can't conveniently forget about it!

Between major renovations to my house and a series of work commitments, I've had to keep postponing production on this. I want to make the thing right, not a sloppy quickie, and there is a good amount of pre-production necessary.

However, the script is written and the stage is set...I'm going to be re-kindling my talks with the various equipment manufacturers at NAB to borrow rigs for the shoot. And if the feature that I'm supposed to start after this one doesn't happen, I'll be putting the DVD project first in line. -->>>

Hi Charles,

Do you have another steadicam operator to shoot you operating the rig? Or you shoot another steadicam operating the rig? Or you just stand in front of a camera mounted on tripod?

Regards
Leigh
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Old April 2nd, 2005, 09:11 PM   #13
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There will be a number of operators, a number of cameras (including ones mounted in unusual places), a number of rigs...
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