Steadicam JR vs. Glidecam 2000 (opinions please!) - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

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Old August 21st, 2005, 04:28 PM   #16
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yeah, thanks guys. So, what kinds of exercises are especially useful in training the arm to remain stable during long shoots? Any tricks of the trade I should know about? (besides the simple curl)
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Old August 21st, 2005, 06:36 PM   #17
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Old August 21st, 2005, 08:11 PM   #18
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Bicep curls are good, Tricep pull-downs helped me a lot too. Flying the rig daily is a better exercise though, and it most certainly will teach you to be a much better op.
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Old August 21st, 2005, 09:01 PM   #19
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Sorry Luke, I was one of those guilty in hijacking your thread...

The first thing that usually sees the fatigue with a handheld stabilizer is the forearm, so make sure to focus on those--wrist curls are the ticket, I think. Popeye would have made a great JR operator.
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Old August 21st, 2005, 10:12 PM   #20
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That's ok Charles,
Community is a good thing. I look forward to the day when I too can pick out a video professional by the sound of his/her voice on a demo clip. Love this forum. Thanks to all for your answers.
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Old August 21st, 2005, 11:44 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke Duncan
thanks for the info, Terry.

Would it be fair to say that you would prefer the Glidecam over the JR if you had the optional forearm brace?
Luke,

Sorry for the late answer. I'm switching around computers and getting a gimbal manufactured as well as school for the kids and all.

The forearm brace does help the wrist but the weight moves to the shoulder area. Having my own system which hooks onto the body is the only really way to handle Glidecam style systems for extended shoots.

How to bulk up for just handheld...When using it that way I feel a strain in my forearm and elbow area. Maybe it would help to get one of those braces used in case of tendonitis. It would help keep the muscles for going wacky I think.

Tery
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Old August 22nd, 2005, 03:20 AM   #22
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Yup.

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Old August 22nd, 2005, 04:04 PM   #23
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Hope this is still relevant, but I used the GlideCam on a short film shoot recently and found it very cumbersome, and unpredictable, maybe I'm just a crap operator, but I ended up simply using the monopod bit without the arm and vest and that produced much better results.

When I returned it to the hire place I told them about it, and the guy there showed me a new piece of kit he's got called the SteadyTracker Pro, no vest, no arm, simply the monopod part and DAMN is it steady, the shots I got within 5 minutes were amazing. Unfortunately it costs more than I can afford to buy, but still less than the GlideCam.
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Old August 22nd, 2005, 08:02 PM   #24
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Andrew: sounds like the Glidecam was not set up properly for you at the very least. The Steadytracker is probably more intuitive a device, and requires virtually no practice, but with the right guidance and plenty of time in the rig, the Glidecam should be capable of better stabilization and control than one can achieve with a Steadytracker.
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Old August 23rd, 2005, 12:10 AM   #25
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Terry-
The elbow brace is a good idea. I'll look into that. This thread has turned up some great info. Thanks all.
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Old October 8th, 2005, 01:04 PM   #26
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I've had my Glidecam 2K Pro for a couple of months and am very satisfied with it (I'm using my old Vx1000). Once it's balanced, and with practice, the unit is great, and I can run like hell and still get an incredibly smooth shot! I was amazed, quite frankly. It will take practice, and lord knows I need it, but once you get the basics, it's awesome. I recently attached a Marshall 4" LCD w/battery pack to the base and rebalanced it perfectly, but boy is it heavy now! The optional forearm brace does help redistribute the weight to your biceps and shoulder muscles, but I still fatigue. I think when I can afford it, I'll pick up a smooth shooter for longer tracking shots. Here's a short sample "home" video that has some G2K footage of my son.

For dialup users or those in a hurry (5MB), decent low-resolution, small
size:

http://rapidshare.de/files/6011716/Nathan_2005_5mb.mov


For the bold hi-speed users (25MB), better resolution and size:

http://srtred.com/FamilyVidz/NATHAN_2005.mov
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Old October 11th, 2005, 10:37 AM   #27
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-thanks for sharing, Armin-
That looks great. I went with the 2K myself and have been very pleased with it; great results so far. The tripod quick-release mounting plate and arm brace are necessary for use in a wedding situation.
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Old October 12th, 2005, 02:00 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke Duncan
-thanks for sharing, Armin-
That looks great. I went with the 2K myself and have been very pleased with it; great results so far. The tripod quick-release mounting plate and arm brace are necessary for use in a wedding situation.
Thanks Luke - I agree, I bought a Bogen 3273 QR plate:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home;jsessionid=DNdyM8mdbn!1926598357?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=5566&is=REG&addedTroughType=sea rch

Works like a charm.
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Old May 15th, 2006, 03:01 AM   #29
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Terry you say:

"The JR has a real frictionless gimbal whereas the Glidecam will have more weight making it more resistant to "footsteps" etc. I really depends on the user and his or her ability to handle the stabilizer.
"

I have used the JR 2-3 month in Croatia with GL2, when i filmed the waterfalls.
I'm happy with the result, but not 100%, because i can see my footstep
on the footage. And i think with the GC2000 this footstep eliminates, because of another gimbal design. If i change my arm higher, the camera moves higher with the JR, but maybe NOT with the Glidecam. (because the gimbal rotates)
Am i wrong?
My friend has a GC4000 with Z1, and produce amazing footage after 4-5 days learning.

thx,
Marton
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Old May 15th, 2006, 08:03 AM   #30
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Both gimbals rotate. I'm not a GC expert but based on what I know, it would be helpful to maintain the same angle of the handle to the rig as you boom up and down. A rotation of the wrist to the right or left would seem to me as being more influential on the GC because you are displacing the rig to the side and vertically as you do so, whereas on the JR or Merlin the rig stays in essentially the same position.

In general I would agree that a heavier rig dampens the vertical movement (i.e. footsteps) more but even with a light setup you can get great results with practice, some of which involves your actual walk.
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