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Old May 22nd, 2015, 02:10 PM   #31
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Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

OK, thank you again.
Just wondered how a camera copes using the stabilizer.

Thanks Kyle.
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Old May 23rd, 2015, 01:48 AM   #32
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Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

I have always used my rig with the camera on full auto so I let it sort out the exposure but the lens is on manual ... I use a Tamron 10-24 set at 10mm so it has a huge DOF and then preset the focus to between 2' and 3' and then go!! As long as I stay at least 2' away from the couple everything will be in focus even at F3.5!!

A sled has a delicate balance so you cannot try and keep it level with one hand and adjust with the other ...you have to make the camera into a point and shoot machine and then concentrate on your camera moves!!
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Old May 23rd, 2015, 02:38 AM   #33
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Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Harding View Post
I have always used my rig with the camera on full auto so I let it sort out the exposure but the lens is on manual ... I use a Tamron 10-24 set at 10mm so it has a huge DOF and then preset the focus to between 2' and 3' and then go!! As long as I stay at least 2' away from the couple everything will be in focus even at F3.5!!

A sled has a delicate balance so you cannot try and keep it level with one hand and adjust with the other ...you have to make the camera into a point and shoot machine and then concentrate on your camera moves!!
Thank you Chris for your advice, that sounds like a good idea as well.

Thanks.
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Old May 24th, 2015, 05:53 PM   #34
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Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Root View Post
Earlier last night, I found this video (among others) showing his holding technique... I tried it, and I like it - as opposed to holding it below the gimbal on the mid shaft section.
As always, it is what works for you. However I suggest you look at BTS footage of working Steadicam operators, or demos/interviews with the Steadicam folk at NAB etc. and you will see that very few if any have fingers above the gimbal. Perhaps they know something that the gentleman in that video doesn't know.

One of the problems with that technique is the possibility of your palm touching the pan gimbal which will hinder stability.

If you were balanced with an infinite drop time, there is a certain logic to controlling from above and below the gimbal because that is where the center of gravity is positioned. However, with a classic drop time of 2 or so seconds, the center of gravity will move under the gimbal and that is where it makes sense to operate the post.

Certainly you don't want to grab onto the post with a death grip no matter where you place our hand, and way down the post doesn't make sense either. Note that you may see what appears to be a death grip (fingers wrapped all around the post vs fingertips) being used by pro operators, but that is actually misleading because they are still using their fingertips, just positioned differently on the post. In all circumstances but heavy wind, the lightest touch is always the best.
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Old May 24th, 2015, 07:24 PM   #35
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Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Anthony??

Please take note that Charles is what I consider a "master guru" of stedicam ... a very highly experienced professional operator so anything he says is well worth considering.

Personally I have always been in the habit of having a light finger touch under the gimbal where the C of G is .... if you look at what Charles calls the death grip then more than likely the balance is way out on the sled!! A lot of the time you shouldn't even need fingers on the post unless you are doing a deliberate tilt

Chris
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Old May 25th, 2015, 04:38 AM   #36
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Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

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As always, it is what works for you. However I suggest you look at BTS footage of working Steadicam operators, ...Certainly you don't want to grab onto the post with a death grip ... the lightest touch is always the best.
Thank you Charles for your valued advice, much appreciated.
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Old May 25th, 2015, 04:50 AM   #37
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Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

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Anthony??

Please take note that Charles is what I consider a "master guru" of stedicam ... a very highly experienced professional operator so anything he says is well worth considering.
I will indeed take note Chris, especially when Charles is consider a "master guru" of stedicam



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Harding View Post
Personally I have always been in the habit of having a light finger touch under the gimbal where the C of G is ....A lot of the time you shouldn't even need fingers on the post unless you are doing a deliberate tilt

Chris
and thank you too Chris for your advice.

As I've said before, this is a great forum :)
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Old May 25th, 2015, 05:12 AM   #38
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Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

I am actually 5 yrs "retired" from Steadicam operating but I think physics haven't changed much since!

Chris--a little nervous by the suggestion that you don't always need fingers on the post. It might inspire novices to allow the guide hand to drop by their side etc. (I've seen footage of people doing exactly that). As you know, it's an extraordinarily subtle balance between applying anywhere from a microscopic amount of touch (when the rig is aimed in one direction and needs little to no tilt) to quite a bit more (whip pans, tilts) but rarely if ever CONTINUOUS touch, as that will induce an over-controlled appearance to the footage. I used to compare it to ABS brakes, which apply an alternating cycle of clamp/release/clamp/release in a very short amount of time.

That said--I've seen confounding BTS footage of people wielding handheld Glidecams with either a brute force grip or one shockingly low on the post, or both, resulting in footage that looks remarkably good (Devin Graham aka devinsupertramp comes to mind). Perhaps I'm being naive to think that post stabilization isn't part of the equation.
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Old May 25th, 2015, 05:42 AM   #39
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Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Hi Charles

I worded that very badly ..what I meant to say is you don't need any sort of death grip on the post just a really light fingers touch .. Your fingers just need to touch the post lightly to maintain control ..which mine do all the time ... what I was crudely attempting to say was if your rig is balanced correctly you should be able to let the post go completely without any ill effects .. trying to reason why people use a death grip and it's usually because the sled is so badly out a wack that you have to grasp it to control it. My left hand is always on the post at all times but just touching enough to keep control.

Sorry I messed up my description !! but yes two hands are needed on a handheld sled without any doubt

Chris
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Old May 25th, 2015, 06:04 AM   #40
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Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

As always I'd suggest anyone getting into a Steadicam-style stabilizer to buy the Steadicam Operator's Handbook (on Amazon, etc), It's largely written for "big rigs" but even if you are working with an inexpensive handheld rig, the essentials remain the same, and the exercises laid out are quite helpful.
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