Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question. at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Stabilizers (Steadicam etc.)


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old April 22nd, 2015, 05:01 AM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 904
Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

After looking through lots of posts about the different stabilizers, (I'm after one for a video camera) Blackbird, Merlin2, Glidecam HD2000 etc.
From what I read, some are easier to setup than others, what I want to ask is, when your finished using it for a particular shot and you set it down, put it in the back of the car to travel to another location or even fold it down and put it away until the next time its needed, does it have to be set up again from scratch?
I've read that some can take as long as 30min to setup.

Thanks in advance.
Anthony McErlean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2015, 05:52 AM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Decatur, AL
Posts: 858
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

I'm curious about this as well.

My "plan" at this point is to basically never take mine apart once I get it set up and balanced. I understand that fine tuning will always need to be done, and as noted elsewhere, I'll probably mark with a paint pen or something, the location of the shaft.

When I got my Glidecam HD2000, I also purchased the $89 light stand bracket that is claimed to help with balancing (so you don't have to hold it), and also serves as a place to dock it when not in use during a shoot. It seemed kind of pricey, but if it will help with those things, I'm all about making my life easier for a small price.

Also, I purchased a Manfrotto 577 QR system to attach to the Glidecam cheeseplate since all my stuff is based around that 501 plate. That is also supposed to make setup quicker and easier as well.

Finally, now that the D750 has dropped in price, I may just pick up a dedicated steadicam camera with another lens (wondering about a 16-35) because I'm not sure how well (?) the 24-120 will actually work at 24mm... if it will be wide enough.
__________________
Kyle
KR Productions; www.kyleroot.com
Kyle Root is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2015, 06:25 AM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 8,222
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Hi Guys

I have a chinese rig with an arm and vest and when I'm done I just unclip the sled from the arm and the arm from the vest and I'm done ... maybe 30 seconds at most. My B-Cam has a QR plate that matches the sled upper plate so taking the camera off for other duties is also instant

Lenses?? My Sony cams are APSC so I use a 10-24 lens set at 10mm for 99% of the work. Remember you don't want to try and focus so at 10mm and the iris full open I still have a DOF from 2' to infinity so I set the focus ring to 2.5' and then just point and shoot. I wouldn't go any more than 10mm on APSC cameras and 15mm on Full Frame ... I think you will find focus issues with anything higher!

24mm even FF Kyle is going to mean you need a really good AF system ..zone focus just won't work!!

Chris
Chris Harding is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2015, 07:57 AM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 904
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Thanks Chris,
I'm probably old school :) but I was going to use a camcorder on a stabilizer compared to what I see most of you do now, with your A7s and so on. What's the advantage over an x900/X70/AC90 or whatever camera? is it to do with the weight od camera?
Had a look at the price of an A7s, its not cheap.

Please enlighten :)
Anthony McErlean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2015, 08:31 AM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Decatur, AL
Posts: 858
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

I'm going to play around. I can put the D750 into DX mode and shoot with my Tokina 11-16 as well.
__________________
Kyle
KR Productions; www.kyleroot.com
Kyle Root is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2015, 08:39 AM   #6
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 8,222
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Hey Anthony

Not really ,, just use the cams you want to shoot with and then get a stedicam to suit them .. I have Sony EA-50's that clock it just under 2kg so my rig is a bit sturdier ... If you are going to shoot with a heavier camera then you need a vest!! Mine is made by Weildy in China ..amazing rigs for under $700!!!

Hi Kyle ... the Tokina will work great .. lock it at 11mm in DX mode and set the focus to between 2 and 3 feet and just go!! I had one before the Tamron .... and it's a great lens!!
Chris Harding is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2015, 09:23 AM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 904
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Thank you Chris, I see, I would prefer not to use a vest.
I would rather have a hand held stabilizer.
So, finding one then that would with a camera, that's another question :)

Thanks.
Anthony McErlean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2015, 12:52 PM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 947
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Another thought, depending on what one is shooting, (can’t have too much gear) …. is to pick up a second cam and put that on the stabilizer. One thing I shoot is musicians so my A-cam will be on a tripod and I picked up a smaller B-cam for use on the Glidecam. This makes for a nice combination because, for example, one can get some close-in shots of the fingering on the instrument that can be cut that in with the main cam’s timeline. Being on the Glidecam there can be movement with the B-cam that adds further interest. The musicians really like the closeups with the B-cam.

Ideally the B-cam should be matching the A-cam; however, the one I’m using is a smaller el-cheapo model of the same brand so, as luck turned out, grading hasn't been a real issue. Also, I picked it up used for a good price on a whim and glad that I did. It has really added some flexibility to the kit.

One more thought, with the B-cam one can use the built-in mic so there’s no dealing with mic cables. It’s unbelievably easy to drop and sync the B-clips into the timeline with FCPX using the audio track and X's sync function.

B-roll is so much fun. Besides, I'll say it again, one can’t have too much kit!!!
John Nantz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2015, 01:57 PM   #9
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Burlington
Posts: 1,961
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Last week I bought a ProAm Autopilot stabilizer and have been practicing but won't actually shoot a project until Friday. So far I'm very pleased with its construction, setup and use. Especially considering the price, and it had good reviews.

I chose the Giottos MH-652 quick release because it looked well suited to the task: low profile, 3/8-16 mounting bolt down through the stabilizer's top plate, the plates are less expensive, and the plates are narrow enough to not block the battery door on the T4i and T3i that I'll be using.

I wanted to use my Canon 17-55 IS f2.8, but quickly realized it is pretty heavy for any long-term use.

I've also tried my Canon 10-22 but it's also on the heavy side.

The only STM lenses I currently have are the 40mm and the 18-135mm. I'll try using the 40 for my closer more stationary views but we'll see on Friday how that goes!

I'm looking at some wider STM lenses, but the 10-18 being only f4.5-5.6 is disappointing. But I'm sure that will make it lighter to use on a stabilizer.

You definitely need a stand for balancing and docking, and even shooting from. I'm using a simple Calumet MF6030 that I had extra. It fits perfectly and doesn't bind when going on or off.
Jay Massengill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2015, 04:46 PM   #10
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 904
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Nantz View Post
Another thought, depending on what one is shooting, (canít have too much gear) Ö. is to pick up a second cam and put that on the stabilizer. One thing I shoot is musicians so my A-cam will be on a tripod and I picked up a smaller B-cam for use on the Glidecam. This makes for a nice combination because, for example, one can get some close-in shots of the fingering on the instrument that can be cut that in with the main camís timeline. Being on the Glidecam there can be movement with the B-cam that adds further interest. The musicians really like the closeups with the B-cam.
Thanks for that John, maybe I should have said but its my B camera I was wanting a stabilizer for.
I have a Panasonic TM900 and a X900 and would use one of these cameras. I hope to buy something to add to my Pannys at some stage, like an X70.

My work flow John, would be along the same lines as yours
A cam on the subject and a B cam, or two, picking up anything else I could used for inserts. (using Edius 7.5)

Can't decide on the Blackbird, Marlin2 or Glidecam HD2000 :)
Anthony McErlean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2015, 04:49 PM   #11
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 904
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Thanks Jay.
Anthony McErlean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 23rd, 2015, 06:16 PM   #12
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 904
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony McErlean View Post
what I want to ask is, when your finished using it for a particular shot and you set it down, put it in the back of the car to travel to another location or even fold it down and put it away until the next time its needed, does it have to be set up again from scratch?
I've read that some can take as long as 30min to setup.
.
Just wondering do you have to set it up from scratch again?
Anthony McErlean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 23rd, 2015, 08:36 PM   #13
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 947
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony McErlean View Post
Just wondering do you have to set it up from scratch again?
Speaking for the Glidecam 2000, so long as the mass location of anything that is mounted doesn't move and nothing else changes (f.e., weights, length of the vertical rod, quick release plate location, etc.), it should fly the same as the previous time.

Change the battery size, add a lens filter, etc., and the mass will change.

Can't speak for any other system because it may be different but my guess the same reasoning will apply.

If the ME-66 is on the fly cam and, say, it moves forward or aft in the shock mount, in theory this will change the mass location. However, maybe a few millimeters one way or the other may not be enough to affect flyability.

If the B-cam is used with just the internal mic for syncing, though, that'd be the best scenario because there's nothing to move, and, it is keeping the mass low and closer to the swivel handle. With the shock mount and the mic on the top of the cam it will increase the height of the mass and I don't know for sure, but I think it would be slightly more difficult to balance.

If the B-cam is in fact the main cam and the mic is needed then so be it, but it's easier without the added mic cable to worry about. The RÝde stereo video mic is nice because it has a smaller cable and a mini plug (cable is light and short).
John Nantz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 23rd, 2015, 10:28 PM   #14
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Decatur, AL
Posts: 858
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

My Glidecam HD 2000 arrived today!

I got it assembled, set up and balanced in about 60 minutes.

The little $89 attachment that attaches to a light stand was super helpful in my opinion in getting everything balanced because I didn't have to hold anything.

If you're on instagram, you can look me up (kylerootproductions) and see the BTS shot I just posted. I'd post here, but too much trouble and I'm tired.

I decided to do the Tokina 11-16 on the D750. Works like a champ!

I'm going to bed now, but plan to get up at 6:00 AM and practice before the rest of the family gets up!
__________________
Kyle
KR Productions; www.kyleroot.com
Kyle Root is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 23rd, 2015, 11:13 PM   #15
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 904
Re: Video Camera Stabilizers, quick question.

Thank you so much John, for all that detail, it is very helpful.
I can understand how it might work now.
It's for my b-camera, tm900, by the sound of things if it's setup and I just need to take the camera off for whatever reason it won't take long to get it up and going again.
Thank you.

Kyle ;) no problem, yes, I have instagram, so I"ll get that sorted later too.
Talk later then,
Thank you.

Last edited by Anthony McErlean; April 24th, 2015 at 03:58 AM.
Anthony McErlean is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Stabilizers (Steadicam etc.)

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:29 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network