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Old October 25th, 2005, 11:03 PM   #31
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Charles,
Do you have an e-mail address for a list of flyers? If not you can contact me at tom62@sbcglobal.net.

Thanks,

Tom Mecozzi
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Old October 26th, 2005, 06:38 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikko Wilson
the smaller chip cameras will will give you a bigger DOF.. making it easier to shoot. The bigger chips will be FAR more light sensetive...which lets you close the irs for better DOF that you cant' do with the little chips.
Hmm.. now i've got myself a little confused..

What I am saying is: With larger chips you get better low light, which means that you more latitiude to close your iris to give you deeper DOF. you have more choice.
With smaller chips, they won't be as good in low light, so you will need to open the iris which will give a shallower DOF, but that may not matter as they allready have a really deep DOF.
With small chips you always get good DOF, but you are limited by low light. With larger chips you can use the iris to choose.. low light or deeper DOF?


Tom (any anyone else);
Regarding finding an Steadicam operator. I can't speak for CP's recomendations, any of whom I wouldn't hesitate to hire by his recomendation. But a good online listing of operators can be found at www.steadicam-ops.com - just search by your local state or country (for those not in the US)

- Mikko
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Old October 26th, 2005, 12:24 PM   #33
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Mikko,
D.O.P. to me isn't that important for what I'm doing as I will be wide open the whole time set on infinity through a wide angle lens. On my camera at work I love to shoot interviews on the sticks from about 20 feet with the iris wide open and the shutter set at about 2000. Beautiful compression with about a 1 foot D.O.P. on the subjects face. I could have 20 gang bangers in the background and you could never make anything out!

Tom
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Old October 26th, 2005, 03:32 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Mecozzi
with all the experience you have, how important is a remote iris? Am I correct in my assumption that I don't need a remote focus because everything I shoot will be through a wide angle adapter set on infinity (D.O.P. through the small 1/3 chips is'nt as criticle as my 2/3 chips that I'm used to therfore forground objects should be in focus as well as background with the adapter?)
Hi Tom,

I think that you really don't need a single shot to through all the rooms. What you can do is to have a break for each room you shoot and adjust your iris manually before you shoot.

Regards
Leigh
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Old October 26th, 2005, 03:55 PM   #35
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Leigh,
Exactley, I do plan on seperating the rooms but I was just alittle worried about establishing a window on a slow pullout with the iris wide open for low light. So I guess in a perfect world I would need a remote ZOOM and not as criticle but if they have it a remote iris control. I spoke with Steve at B and S in hollywood and he told me he could help set me up with a Flyer and rig everything including Varizoom controls.

Thanks,

Tom
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Old October 26th, 2005, 04:14 PM   #36
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Quote:...."All handheld (on shoulder) would kill me after about 2 hours continuous plus I need steady statics...."

If this is what you need, Have a look at the EngRig for shoulder cameras and
at the DvRigPro or Junior for handheld cameras.

Danny Natovich
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www.dvtec.tv
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Old October 26th, 2005, 05:00 PM   #37
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my opinion is that steady-x devices are not good for static shoot.
they are great for motion but when you stop moving, you can not avoid balancing or small movement.

If you need to be stable for a long time while keeping some freedom, take a proper balanced shoulder mount (or build one) with a light camera on it.
i have built one with aluminum tubes for such events like concert or theatrical that can be 2 or 3 hours long, require long steady shoot.
I have worked with and believe me, i would not use my glidecam in such situation.
When i mean proper balanced shoulder system , i mean a system that keep the camera in front of you , has enough weight at the rear to keep it in equilibrium on your shoulder, so you do not need to lift the camera, but just to grab it.
in this area you can find some backpack with a rod that goes over your head.
the camera is suspended with some elastic to this rod.
I do not remember the name of this device but you can purchase it or build from a diver backpac and a aluminum tube.
I made one a never used because i still prefer the shoulder support, giving more stability.
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Old October 26th, 2005, 05:39 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danny Natovich
Quote:...."All handheld (on shoulder) would kill me after about 2 hours continuous plus I need steady statics...."

If this is what you need, Have a look at the EngRig for shoulder cameras and
at the DvRigPro or Junior for handheld cameras.

Danny Natovich
DvTec
www.dvtec.tv
Actually just visit supermarket and buy a bean bag. It is just US$10 I imagine sold in USA. I got mine for NZ$15 one year ago. That way you will release your shoulder burden forever. ;-) I can guarantee that it will be steady than any man hold the camera on earth. ;-)

Regards
Leigh
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Old October 26th, 2005, 05:58 PM   #39
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Leigh.. you are once more coming a little outside your knowledge.. A DVrig is not meant to be a cusion between yrou shoulder and a shoulder mounted camera (they have a pad for that reason). It is designed to hold smaller camera out in front and effectivly balance it on yrou shoulder. I'll let Danny go into details if he wishes..
And yes, as I think i mentioned, a DVrig is one solution that coudl work well for this.. similar style to ENG, except it's lighter.

Giroud, I belive you are refering to the Easyrig (http://www.easyrig.com/) Which, could actually be an EXCELENT solution for this situation. It'll hold your existing camera, and as it isn't so critically based on balance you still have full regular control of yoru camera.
The final support will be about the same as the Steadicam, without the added weight of the arm and sled.. so you can shoot longer.
Also it won't take nearly as long to master... [never used one, so I can't say how hard it is.. it doesn't *seem* that hard.. but I've heard that before somewhere... :) ] CP, have you ever used one?
Definatly a good sugestion in my oppinion. Price ins't bad either, look to be somewhere around $2000.. At least give it a try if possible.

Man, are there a lot of options out there or what?

..you coudl also mount a small Technocrane on a medium Technocrane mounted to a big Technocrane. and then just pull up to the door and shoot from there! :-O

- Mikko
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Old October 26th, 2005, 06:35 PM   #40
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Hi Mikko,

I don't know about DVrig and I know about the bean bag. I have tried various ways to experience the bean bag. I found the bean bag very useful. And it is really affordable. It can be put any position has a platform to hold it. I imagine shoulder mount device has one fixed position which is at shoulder level. Am I right on this? And you need to put more strength to use shoulder mount device than the bean bag, right? The bean bag is also very friendly to the floor. The bean bag won't wear you out for long time use compare to whatever shoulder mount device.

[Disclaim]

I don't sell any kind of bean bag. I have no relationship whatever to bean bag manufacturer.

Regards
Leigh

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikko Wilson
Leigh.. you are once more coming a little outside your knowledge..
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Old October 26th, 2005, 07:20 PM   #41
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Guys, those are all great suggestions. The bag on the floor does make for an excellent floor base. The DV rigs do look interesting but I will not have the time to switch rigs, I can only use one from the start and I'm hoping the Steadi system will give me the best of all worlds. I can't imagine squating down and trying to do a jib-like shot with a foreground object using a DV rig. I am trying to make a continuous fluid movement of interesting unusual moves along with the standard pullouts that are so common in real estate shooting. For you guys who are familiar with those systems, don't your legs still add slight movement no matter what the platform?

Thanks,

Tom
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Old October 26th, 2005, 07:42 PM   #42
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Hi Tom,

You are a really nice person. ;-)

Regards
Leigh

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Mecozzi
Guys, those are all great suggestions. The bag on the floor does make for an excellent floor base. The DV rigs do look interesting but I will not have the time to switch rigs, I can only use one from the start and I'm hoping the Steadi system will give me the best of all worlds. I can't imagine squating down and trying to do a jib-like shot with a foreground object using a DV rig. I am trying to make a continuous fluid movement of interesting unusual moves along with the standard pullouts that are so common in real estate shooting. For you guys who are familiar with those systems, don't your legs still add slight movement no matter what the platform?

Thanks,

Tom
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Old October 26th, 2005, 08:00 PM   #43
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The "Steadicam like" systems are not designed for "Steady Static shoots" they are great and designed for beautiful continues camera movement.

Trying to hold a fixed, Tripod like, frame with a Steadicam is almost impossible. you will always get some wobbling.

It is also not very easy to use them for long periods and the learning curve is
Looong.

Every tool mentioned here has it's purpose and the operators experience and
practice is the most important tool and makes the difference.

The DvRigs are designed as a compromise between tripods and steady cams, for one-man documentaries and limited crew and budget productions. In such conditions there are no magic solutions, Just practice and experience.


Danny Natovich
DvTec
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Old October 26th, 2005, 10:09 PM   #44
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Thanks again,

Leigh, I'll take a compliment wherever I can so thanks.
Danny, I'll take a closer look at those rigs, hopefully B and S will have one I can rent. I guess until I try one of these things I should just shut-up and leave you guys alone-learn by doing,no better way.

Thanks again,

Tom
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Old October 26th, 2005, 10:33 PM   #45
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Hey Tom,
If B&S can't get you hooked up for a demo and you want to try a Flyer, I'm in the LA area and have a Flyer and an XL2. If you are interested in checking them out you are welcome to contact me. I've even got a house that you could wonder thoruhg, though it's certainly not the type you are talking about. I know another person in the area that has a Flyer also that may be able to help you out with operating as well. You can just shoot me an email.

Matt
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