Steadicam Flyer Operating Questions at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Stabilizers (Steadicam etc.)


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old March 25th, 2007, 07:11 PM   #1
Still Motion
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 1,186
Steadicam Flyer Operating Questions

I've used the glidecam and Magiqcam for years. After getting the XHA1, the glidecam was too heavy to use handheld and it was time to move up from the Magiqcam. So, I do have experience with these types of rigs for several years now however nothing nearly as good as the Flyer. So, after using the flyer for a couple days, I have some general operating questions that I couldn't find in the manual and I don't have a VHS player to view the instructional video.

Is there an ideal height at which the camera should sit on the arm in front of you? The A1 ia only 5lbs so even with everything loosened as much as posisble, it still seems high.

Will I get noticeably better performance by trying to add more weight to the rig, or is that something a good operator can work around? The 5lb XHA1 seems very easy to translate smaller bumps and movements from your hand to the camera.

Should the sled when properly balanced sit in front of your body with no hands? I can get it to stay there, but then a slight movement and it will sway one way to another.

If I hold the arm in front of me without the sled on it, should the post where the sled mounts to be level when in front of my body. I'm havig a hard time trying to figure out how to adjust everything around the socket block correctly so any other tips would be great.

Lastly, I'm assuming that the optical image stabilizer would cause more problems with a steadicam rather than helping. Is there any situation with the rig where this would be useful?

Thanks for any info.

Patrick
www.still-motion.ca
Patrick Moreau is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2007, 01:02 AM   #2
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 6,781
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Moreau View Post
Is there an ideal height at which the camera should sit on the arm in front of you? The A1 ia only 5lbs so even with everything loosened as much as posisble, it still seems high.

Will I get noticeably better performance by trying to add more weight to the rig, or is that something a good operator can work around? The 5lb XHA1 seems very easy to translate smaller bumps and movements from your hand to the camera.
Hi Patrick:

Yes, the naked A1 is going to be on the bottom end of the Flyer weight range, so it will sit high (technically speaking, the gimbal will be set low on the post). Adding more weight to the camera will, as you surmised, improve many things--the gimbal will raise, the rig will be more inert and you will likely find it 'easier' to operate. I would recommend a steel plate between the dovetail and camera, perhaps 5 lbs or so. I think Tiffen may even sell one, but if you have access to a machinist this would be much less expensive.

Should the sled when properly balanced sit in front of your body with no hands? I can get it to stay there, but then a slight movement and it will sway one way to another.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Moreau View Post
If I hold the arm in front of me without the sled on it, should the post where the sled mounts to be level when in front of my body. I'm havig a hard time trying to figure out how to adjust everything around the socket block correctly so any other tips would be great.
I generally consider the proper adjustment is that the mounting post should actually be tipped back and away from the rig (i.e. if you mount the arm on the right side of the vest, it should lean to the right as well as back) We are only talking a few degrees here. When you mount the rig, the idea is that you can stand comfortably and the rig will just float at your side without requiring you to rein it in. Load up the rig and walk in place for a number of steps, then stop. If the rig tries to pull away from you in a given direction, adjust the socket block accordingly until that no longer happens.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Moreau View Post
Lastly, I'm assuming that the optical image stabilizer would cause more problems with a steadicam rather than helping. Is there any situation with the rig where this would be useful?
You are correct, one should leave the OIS off when using a stabilizer.
__________________
Charles Papert
www.charlespapert.com
Charles Papert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 3rd, 2007, 08:27 PM   #3
Still Motion
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 1,186
Thanks for the detailed reply Charles. I added a wide angle with sunshade plus a firestore and that seemed to help quite a bit. Still looking for a place to get a plate made though.

Thanks again.
Patrick Moreau is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Stabilizers (Steadicam etc.)

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:36 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network