75% of US pros still using film - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Still Crazy

Still Crazy
You say you want resolution? The whole world is watching these digicams.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old October 15th, 2007, 07:50 AM   #16
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Mays Landing, NJ
Posts: 11,527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Butler View Post
Of course, Kodak is the world's largest supplier of film. Does this mean that's all they do? C'mon, they are not oblivious to the world.
Kodak has always been a great company, and as someone who lived near Rochester for many years, I've known people who worked there. But they're definitely having a hard time making the transition. Their stock is still trading where it was 5 years ago and is only half of what it was in 1999. See the following chart where Kodak is the blue line and Canon is the red line, it tells the whole story: http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?s=EK&t...&z=l&q=l&c=caj

They're taking their medicine, but it looks like some difficult years ahead. See the following: http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/070928/kodak...film.html?.v=1

Quote:
Even as revenues in its traditional businesses tumble, Kodak is still leaning hard on high-margin film to generate the profits needed to see it through the most painful passage in its 126-year history.
_________

Kodak's work force also is contracting: its global payroll will soon slide to 34,000, half what it was five years ago. In Rochester, there will be fewer than 10,000 employees -- versus 60,400 in 1983.
Boyd Ostroff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 15th, 2007, 11:16 AM   #17
Machinist Mate
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Southern Connecticut
Posts: 644
Yep.
Quote:
The shift to digital is irreversible now -- Kodak's digital research operations are based at Kodak Park -- but Burley thinks Kodak "wasn't changing fast enough" before the arrival in 2003 of its current chief executive, Antonio Perez.
They need to step it up pronto.
Quote:
"I think Perez realizes that the company does have a lot to offer and can be successful in this new electronic system of image-making," Burley said. "But dramatic changes are required, and required quickly."
__________________
I ain't straight outta Compton, I'm straight out the trailer. Cuss like a sailor, drink like a Mc. My only words of wisdom are just, "Radio Edit."
Mike Butler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 15th, 2007, 11:44 AM   #18
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: San Mateo, CA
Posts: 3,840
KODAK will survive, as they adapt. The question of course, is speed. Can they become 'IBM'??? "International Business Machines" primary business was making adding machines 'back in the day. MECHANICAL adding machines.

I think KODAK will adapt and thrive, but as the articles say, it's a painful process.
Richard Alvarez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 15th, 2007, 12:43 PM   #19
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Marin & Davis, CA, USA
Posts: 418
http://www.kodak.com/eknec/documents...cks_100x80.jpg
http://www.kodak.com/eknec/documents...rds_100x80.jpg
http://www.kodak.com/eknec/documents...ies_100x80.jpg

They'll be fine.

The difference, though, is that they don't have a monopoly on the market, as they do with film.
Daniel Ross is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 15th, 2007, 04:20 PM   #20
Trustee
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: NZ
Posts: 1,276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainer Hoffmann View Post
when you spent a hell of a lot of money for a trip to the African bush shooting wildlife.
Hi Rainer,

How much cost involved for a trip to the African bush shooting wildlife?

TIA

Regards
Leigh
Leigh Wanstead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2007, 01:02 AM   #21
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Syke, Germany
Posts: 249
Hi Leigh,

it depends very much on where and how you go. If you go on a four week trip to Botswana and want to have a private guide for the whole time (which is highly recommended for shooting wildlife) it can easily get as expensive as 10-15k$ plus international air fares. But of course you can do a camping trip for much less. However, you won't be able to get to the "wildlife hot spots" then. The Botswana government restricts access to the real interesting places and therefore it's very, very expensive. Alas!

Kenya and Tansania are less expensive but more crowded. Somtimes you have 20 vehicles near a lion sighting. Not very good for photography.

So think twice if you want to make money from wildlife photography. You don't get rich. But it's a lot of fun!
__________________
Keep rolling

Rainer
Rainer Hoffmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2007, 02:23 AM   #22
Trustee
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: NZ
Posts: 1,276
Hi Rainer,

Thanks for the answer.

I can not afford that. Pretty sad.

Regards
Leigh
Leigh Wanstead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2007, 08:12 AM   #23
Machinist Mate
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Southern Connecticut
Posts: 644
Never mind get rich! Just clearing costs and not losing a fortune sounds like enough of a problem! OMG!
__________________
I ain't straight outta Compton, I'm straight out the trailer. Cuss like a sailor, drink like a Mc. My only words of wisdom are just, "Radio Edit."
Mike Butler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2007, 11:31 AM   #24
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 6,773
I would say that 90% of the shows I operate on remain 35mm (and as an indication of the relative budgets, 90% of the jobs I DP are HD...!)
__________________
Charles Papert
www.charlespapert.com
Charles Papert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2007, 12:56 PM   #25
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Truro Cornwall UK
Posts: 26
Wishful thinking?

I would certainly take that Kodak statement with a pinch of salt - 75% ?? I am confident that is certainly not the case here in the UK anyway. As a pro commercial and editorial photog of more than 25 years I have seen many changes over the years and have not shot any film now for the last five of them. Copy artwork onto 4x5 inch trannie was the last to go - at which point I closed my traditional lab facility.

Digital capture has many advantages over film but it's certainly true that post production computer time is now a significant factor. On my commercial location work for example I have found the overall time spent on the assignment to be about the same, but the time split ratio has changed dramatically.

In the past I would have spent a long time shooting Polaroids etc to get the final image on film at the time of shooting. Now I can spend much less time on the actual location shoot, but that time saving is cancelled out by the much longer post production of the raw images.

Digital cameras have a fixed native resolution so any assignment needing really large images - billboard posters for example or automobile advertising stuff etc - could still perhaps benefit from being shot on film since this can then be scanned at very high resolution. However, modern interpolation software does an incredible job of increasing the files generated by digital cameras.

Do I miss the "good ol' days" of film? ... Nope ... not a bit!

Peter
__________________
Peter Phelan
www.tele-prompt.com www.theimagingcompany.co.uk
Peter Phelan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2007, 03:59 PM   #26
Trustee
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: NZ
Posts: 1,276
Hi Rainer,

Do you have a website to have a look at your art?

TIA

Regards
Leigh

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainer Hoffmann View Post
Hi Leigh,

it depends very much on where and how you go. If you go on a four week trip to Botswana and want to have a private guide for the whole time (which is highly recommended for shooting wildlife) it can easily get as expensive as 10-15k$ plus international air fares. But of course you can do a camping trip for much less. However, you won't be able to get to the "wildlife hot spots" then. The Botswana government restricts access to the real interesting places and therefore it's very, very expensive. Alas!

Kenya and Tansania are less expensive but more crowded. Somtimes you have 20 vehicles near a lion sighting. Not very good for photography.

So think twice if you want to make money from wildlife photography. You don't get rich. But it's a lot of fun!
Leigh Wanstead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 17th, 2007, 12:31 AM   #27
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Syke, Germany
Posts: 249
Hi Leigh,

yes, we have a website. Since you ask specifically I hope it's ok to post the URL here:

http://www.hoffmann-photography.com

It's not only wildlife, though.
__________________
Keep rolling

Rainer
Rainer Hoffmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 17th, 2007, 01:20 PM   #28
Trustee
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: NZ
Posts: 1,276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainer Hoffmann View Post
Hi Leigh,

yes, we have a website. Since you ask specifically I hope it's ok to post the URL here:

http://www.hoffmann-photography.com

It's not only wildlife, though.
Wow ;-)

May I ask how you protect yourself from the big cat?

TIA

Regards
Leigh
Leigh Wanstead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 18th, 2007, 12:44 AM   #29
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Syke, Germany
Posts: 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leigh Wanstead View Post
Wow ;-)
May I ask how you protect yourself from the big cat?
Leigh
Hi Leigh,

I'm afraid, we are hijacking this thread, but the big cats are really no big problem. The mosquitoes are! And the "Gentle Giants" can be quite, well, 'un'gentle at times. But that's why I recommend to have a good guide.
__________________
Keep rolling

Rainer
Rainer Hoffmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 18th, 2007, 10:35 AM   #30
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 2,222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willard Hill View Post
I think the key to this is that they sent the survey to 40,000 photographers and only 9,000 of them responded. Of that 9,000, 75% still favor film. One could project that had the other 31,000 responded that this pattern would have held true, but perhaps most of those that replied were those who felt threatened by digital and wanted to strike a blow back so as to speak.
Agreed. The survey involves a selective response, made famous by Shere Hite when a ridiculously high number (high 90's) of her audience responded that they had extramarital affairs. Survey methods often neglect to mention the number of surveys conducted and whether the reports an average of those surveys or just one that supports.

Most Kodak "pro" customers would use film since Kodak doesn't have offerings in the DSLR market comparable to Nikon and Canon. If you read the article, there is no single line claiming that 75% of photographers *favor* film .

From the Kodak article:
"75 percent of the 9,000 who responded said they will continue to use film even as they embrace digital imaging."

This is marketing (fancy word for selling) speak for unquantifiable sales, as there is no mention of the volume of film used.
Gints Klimanis is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Still Crazy

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:09 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network