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Old February 21st, 2009, 08:24 AM   #1
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The Best way to get a job?

Hey guys,

I just graduated a couple of months ago and am now in the hunt to find a stable job either shooting or in post. The thing is, I'm not sure I'm looking for jobs the right way. So far, I've really only responded to ads on Craigslist or Mandy. Is there another website I don't know about or is there something else I should be doing entirely?
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Old February 21st, 2009, 10:09 AM   #2
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You could make good contacts by volunteering time on independent/student shoots. I make a point a hiring capable crew (or at least recommending them) that have volunteered for me in the past.

Experience is good, but initiative and reliability are often more desirable.


J.
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Old February 21st, 2009, 10:12 AM   #3
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That's pretty much what I've been doing now. Unfortunately, they have really only served as good references and reel and resume builders.
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Old February 21st, 2009, 10:36 AM   #4
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Build a website. It can be simple.

Upload demo reels for shoot and editing. Upload clips in different categories. Categories can range from interviews, music videos, tv spots, corporate video, events, news style, features, (just to give you an idea). This way you'll have both a general reel and specific clips for those interested in specific services.

Describe any specific skills you have.
List noteworthy projects if you think names of clients or projects might be recognizable to some.
Write a short bio which would give the reader an indication of your personality, skills, background.

Post an ad daily on craigslist with a very short description and link to your website.
Don't make the mistake of being all things to all people. An ad for corporate work is not the same as an ad for feature work or an ad for wedding video. You need to target the specific needs of the potential client.

Make sure the rates you charge are enough to survive on. NEVER work for less. You can build your reel doing volunteer video for non profits for example. Don't give away or low ball services for for profit entities. Word of mouth can hurt as well as help. If referrals come in because you've worked below a survivable rate you'll wind up busy and homeless.
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Old February 21st, 2009, 10:45 AM   #5
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Personally I'm suspicious of anyone who asks for references. I don't believe in giving away client contact info. In certain cases in may be clear that the person is truly a client and not someone looking to steal but I make that decision on a case by case basis.

References are important for staff positions, of course, but generally someone looking to hire will base the decision on a reel and an interview.

If you do work to "build your reel" you should interview THEM. Walking in to an untrained unskilled crew situation may not give you the support you need to develop a decent reel. if it's for YOUR reel you need to know what the job offers YOU. On the other hand developing relationships with other skilled people will allow you to develop a list of people you can call on (for pay) to crew a professional shoot.
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Old February 21st, 2009, 03:05 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harsha Angampalli View Post
That's pretty much what I've been doing now. Unfortunately, they have really only served as good references and reel and resume builders.
Well then that puts you ahead of most people just out of school. :-)


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Old February 21st, 2009, 03:08 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Craig Seeman View Post
Build a website. It can be simple.
He could simply open a MySpace account. No page-building knowledge required, and no hosting fees. He can either upload his videos to MySpace or link to Vimeo for better quality.


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Old February 21st, 2009, 03:39 PM   #8
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Thanks for the tips guys, much appreciated. I'm definitely going to do the website thing. But what about getting a 9-7 salary job at a post house or something?
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Old February 21st, 2009, 05:22 PM   #9
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You might want to go back to school and learn a field where there are job openings like the medical field.
Unfortunately you picked a field where jobs are being cut everyday.

Good Luck!
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Old February 21st, 2009, 06:06 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Harsha Angampalli View Post
Thanks for the tips guys, much appreciated. I'm definitely going to do the website thing. But what about getting a 9-7 salary job at a post house or something?
Starting out you could try to get a job as a runner, assuming they're taking still taking them on these days. Certainly in the UK that's the getting in through the door job in most UK post houses.

Unless you've got high end skills that are in demand, I wouldn't expect a stable job just after graduating. Most people just start out freelancing and building up their contacts, which can take a number of years.
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Old February 22nd, 2009, 11:51 AM   #11
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If you're looking for a staff position you need to think about what skills you have and need to learn. It sounds obvious but it's not.

Runners/messenger jobs are not as common now with so many alternate forms of delivery. You also need to evaluate your experience vs facility needs.

Can you be an entry level Production Assistant for shoots?
Can you work in "duplication" or as an Editorial Assistant?
Can you exemplify your SKILLS (not always the same as having a reel)?

If you're seeking an internship make sure the facility can teach you what you need to know and, at the same time, deliver something valuable to the facility. Many, but not all, craigslist internships aren't internships at all. Exploiting free labor is NOT an internship. Internships means assisting very experienced people who will impart knowledge and experience to you. You need to "interview" them as much as they interview you.

If you're seeking a paid position you need to consider what you can really offer right now with confidence. Do you know how to ingest from various formats, log shots, organize bins for an Avid or Final Cut Pro edit? Do you know with confidence all the things a PA needs to do on a shoot?

You haven't mentioned your skill sets so it's very hard to talk about specific job targets.

Many people overlook where jobs might be. There is not only independent production facilities there's, internal corporate media, ad agencies, local cable stations, etc.

BTW a lot of my video work is doing Reporter Demo Reels (a skill itself I learned from doing Video News Releases). While not overtly "(creative)technical" positions they are becoming so as reporters often have to shoot and edit their own stories in small stations. Many people often think large networks but often it's the small local cable station where opportunity knocks.
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