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Old September 28th, 2003, 02:26 PM   #1
Capt. Quirk
 
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Production sheets?

Does anyone know of a place to download various production sheets? I'm looking for break down sheets, budget, shot schedules, the works. Thanks.
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Old September 29th, 2003, 03:20 PM   #2
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I designed my own based on:

FILM & VIDEO BUDGETS, by D. Simon and M Wiese
THE GUERILLA FILM MAKERS MOVIE BLUEPRINT, by C. Jones

Excel is a great tool for this.

Hope this helps...

Cheers!
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Old September 29th, 2003, 04:30 PM   #3
Capt. Quirk
 
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Thanks Derrick. I've been wanting to get that book, but just spent my monthly book allowance on The Complete Idiot's Guide To Filmmaking. Talk about an ego deflator, just looking at these books kills my morale!

Have you done any films yet?
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Old September 30th, 2003, 10:21 AM   #4
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Working on finishing up a few projects which I will post screenshots and other goodies soon. I am in pre-production for a feature which I am d.p. Story boarding at the moment.

My particular focus is in cinematography. There is always something to learn or study. Sometimes too much. I wouldn't have it any other way.

Observe, absorb, organize, build, do, and breathe deep... Don't forget to breathe! HAR HAR. Hit the pressure release valve on your ambitions. Your entitled...

"Standing on my hill, of a mountain of dreams, telling myself, it's not as hard, hard as it seems..." - - Led Zeppelin

Keep me informed of your endeavors.

Cheers!

Derrick
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Old September 30th, 2003, 08:36 PM   #5
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Speak of the devil... I was following a link to Markertek posted by Ken on another thread, and lo and behold there was what you've been asking about. Check out MovieForms Pro.

Says it includes

* The standard forms & signs of the industry
* Supports pre-production, production & post-production
* Mac & PC compatible
* Easy to customize with your logo, etc.
* Works with any printer

and lists about three dozen specific forms that are included.

UPDATE: I went to http://www.movieforms.com and checked out what they have to offer in detail. It's more geared toward signs for the set and releases than actual production forms. No shot list or anything like that. Ah well...the search continues.
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Old October 1st, 2003, 07:55 AM   #6
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Shotlists can be created of 'Final Draft' if you have the cash to spend. It has some great reports that you can manipulate.

If you want me to send you some release forms, ala Word Docs/PDFs, let me know.

Forward your email on O-VAH.

Cheers!

Derrick
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Old October 1st, 2003, 08:43 AM   #7
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"The Complete Film Production Handbook" by Eve Light Honthaner

Production schedules, releases, contracts, deal memos, insurance forms, etc.

Its in there.
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Old October 1st, 2003, 05:05 PM   #8
Capt. Quirk
 
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Richard, John, et al... I am trying to avoid spending at this point. I did look at that book Richard mentioned, or one like it. It was like $30-$40, which is almost as much as one of my props will run me. So you can see where I have to decide between resource materials or programs and production. Plus, I'm a real cheap Bastad ;) I should have probably got it instead of the idiot's guide, but $20 was what I had at the moment.

As far as the forms, I never seriously thought about them, as I am a do first- paperwork later type of guy. This is changing rapidly. I did find some free script breakdown sheets at www.mwp.com , and that is a start. I also found a very rough budget sheet elsewhere. I still think this would be more fun without the paperwork.

And finally , on to Derrick- I would be grateful for whatever forms you can send. Either format should be fine-
keith@video-alchemy.com . I like the features that seem to come with Final Draft, unfortunately, I got the free program, Rough Draft. It doesn't seem to do much more than Quark Xpress, so I stuck with what I know best. And I can use Quark to make the movie posters too!

Thanks again, everybody!
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Old October 2nd, 2003, 09:03 AM   #9
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Keith,

I sent you some forms.

As far as, production/shot breakdowns, I do the following:

1. Break down the script to an OUTLINE, i.e. EXT, INT, FX using a word processor or other similar application. (Put page number as reference to script.)

2. Break down, organize further into LOCATIONS, TIME OF DAY, etc. (I have run into a situation where there are shots that are INT shots that are dependent on the EXT or location. I would offset the INT scene against the dependent EXT or vice versa, to know that these shots must be completed on the same day.)

(I found using a grid or table helpful, with headers, 'Location', 'Character', 'Properties', 'Notes', etc.)

3. Storyboard the story. Shot by shot. Breakdown further if needed. This will clarify the text above.

Althought, the breakdown and storyboard should give you an excellent plan of action, there is definately hidden shots and obstacles that will present themselves.

Time your set up and breakdown times. This will help you judge the time needed between camera/location changes.

Cheers!
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Old October 2nd, 2003, 02:11 PM   #10
Capt. Quirk
 
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Derrick- I got them. Thanks again!

This is what I have done so far as script breakdown- I went through the script, and every location change or time change got noted as a scene.

I then noted location, time, and cast that are relevent to that scene.In most cases, I listed by location, prefferring to get those shot at the same time, and save time traveling back and forth.

I have an actor coming in from L.A. to do this. He is only in 7 scenes, so those were grouped together, as he's not likely to travel back and forth. He will be at 3 locations, unfortunately, only 1 will coordinate with the rest of the actors.

This gave me an idea of when and where I would be shooting. Now, If I could only get the locations secured, things would be much better !
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Old October 2nd, 2003, 02:25 PM   #11
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Shooting under a little pressure adds energy. And stress... Don't forget to eat. HAR HAR.

I have a few locations un-secured, but do-able. I am glad the shots are/ or at least should be fairly quick.

Cheers!

Derrick
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Old October 2nd, 2003, 04:37 PM   #12
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<<<-- Originally posted by Derrick Begin : Keith,

I sent you some forms.

As far as, production/shot breakdowns, I do the following:

1. Break down the script to an OUTLINE, i.e. EXT, INT, FX using a word processor or other similar application. (Put page number as reference to script.)

2. Break down, organize further into LOCATIONS, TIME OF DAY, etc. (I have run into a situation where there are shots that are INT shots that are dependent on the EXT or location. I would offset the INT scene against the dependent EXT or vice versa, to know that these shots must be completed on the same day.)

(I found using a grid or table helpful, with headers, 'Location', 'Character', 'Properties', 'Notes', etc.)

3. Storyboard the story. Shot by shot. Breakdown further if needed. This will clarify the text above.

Althought, the breakdown and storyboard should give you an excellent plan of action, there is definately hidden shots and obstacles that will present themselves.

Time your set up and breakdown times. This will help you judge the time needed between camera/location changes.

Cheers! -->>>

Derrick - If you don't mind could you send me what ever forms you've got? Thanks - margerake@communeanimations.com
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