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Old October 10th, 2002, 09:01 PM   #1
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National archive footage

Can anyone explain the procedure for getting national archive footage such as combat footage, photo's, is it public domain, what does it take to aquire the footage if it is public? I have searched this site and didn't see anything, also searched NARA's site but never got to any topics that were helpful. Is a public shot in someones elses publication fair game?
Thanks
Don
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Old October 10th, 2002, 09:41 PM   #2
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Hi Don,
I don't have the definitive answer for you. Most of the "archives" I've seen are not really public domain, per se. They're custodied by some organization that charges at least some nominal fee for their aquisition and use.

Here's an example of a hub for searching for such footage:

http://www.footage.net/

I hope this is somewhat helpful.
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Old October 11th, 2002, 10:52 AM   #3
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Hi,

If you are referring to getting footage from the Library of Congress, as I understand it the costs are fairly reasonable and are primarily for the cost of the tape and transfer. (There may also be some minimums in the way of time involved.)

But do take this with a grain of salt, as I have not done this myself - just had tangential exposure/conversation with peers who have gotten footage for their films.

So, I would look it to it further as it may be a very rich and even affordable resource. (Not everything there is in public domain, but there are many interesting works which are.) I think there is even some proxy footage available to look at online, which you can either just use as a download or later request as a transfer to tape.

Go here to check it out: http://memory.loc.gov/

(The various catalogs are comprised of different media - that is, not all are films. You can either search across all catalogs for the type of stuff you are after or just dig through specific ones. The copyright and transfer costs should be listed therein.)

Also, worth noting is this resource: http://www.archive.org/

They have both compressed and full-screen footage available royalty-free/free of charge. Just check over the details to see if there are any conditions of use. (Also, make sure the cable modem is hooked up and ready for the heavy lifting...)

HTH,
Clayton
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Old October 11th, 2002, 06:52 PM   #4
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Awesome,

thanks Ken and Clayton for the help.
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Old October 24th, 2002, 04:26 PM   #5
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You go to the National Archives II in College Park, MD., or you pay someone to go for you. It works like a library and you can view (and copy, if you wish) any item with a reference copy available.

http://www.archives.gov/research_roo...ture_room.html

if you find something you like (and want to pay for a `broadcast` quality copy), they have a approved list of labs that can make copies from "Intermediates" to film or video.

The stuff on the shelf goes from very poor to execellent.

Let me know if you need more info,
Mark
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Old August 3rd, 2006, 02:00 PM   #6
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Hey Mark, I don't know if you still participate (and this is open to anyone who knows the answer), but I was wondering about the process of making your own copies. I did a search for some war footage in NARA's website and found some that had copies on Digital Betacam tapes. Would it be possible to transfer a copy there at NARA or do I have to have it shipped out to an approved vendor?
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Old August 3rd, 2006, 03:03 PM   #7
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I have a friend who a number of years ago used to go there all the time with his camcorder and transfer from the reference copies.
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Old August 4th, 2006, 08:25 AM   #8
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Bill,
Can I contact your friend via email, is possible? I'd like to ask him some questions. Let me know. Thanks!
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Old August 4th, 2006, 12:17 PM   #9
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Nick,
The archives is searchable via ARC, their on-line database of archived materials. If you locate 'moving images' items you are interested in and follow the items link, there is a discription of the item.

Part of the description is what kinks of copies they have (in College Park, MD). They have three types of copies; reference, reproduction, and preservation. What you care about are reverence and reproduction copies.

Reference copies can be used on site and for moving images will be either 3/4 inch U-matic, 16mm film or 35 mm film.

They have viewing stations that you can use to look at the reference copies. If the item has an 'unrestricted' access restriction you can make a copy or they will dub a vhs copy of 3/4 inch tape.

If unrestricted, you can make a copy at the viewing stations. For film you tape a copy by directly recording the film playback screen, there is a RCA jack for audio. For U-matic, their is a BNC connector for video and RCA jack for audio.

The quality varies quite a bit, from pretty good to garbage.

I made recording of both tape and film using a mini-dv video camera and got some decent stuff. If using a different media you might need time base correction, etc.

If you need the best quality copy they have available, your item must either have a reporduction copy or be willing to pay for a reproduction copy to be made. I don't know anything about the making of a reporduction copy.

If there is a reproduction copy available, it can be in several formats of film or video. Idealy, you want a digi-beta reporduction copy available. Once you locate an item with unrestricted access and a reproduction copy available, they have an approved vendor list that can make you a copy and transfer it to whatever media you want. If their is a digi-beta reproduction copy available it is a moderate fee dependent on length.

As far as copyright, on the ARC item record they will tell you what they know in the 'use restrictions' area. You will need to know some basic copyright law and follow up on what 'use' information that they have.

I hope this is helpful and I will be happy to give more info, if I can...
Mark

below is an info link and part of a ARC record


http://www.archives.gov/research/for...ture-room.html


ARC Identifier: 92520
Title: [LIBERATOR BOMBER CEREMONY], ca. 1942
Creator: Ford Motor Company. ( Most Recent)
Type of Archival Materials:
Moving Images
Level of Description:
Item from Collection FC: Ford Motor Company Collection, ca. 1903 - ca. 1954
Location: Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Records LICON, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-M), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001 PHONE: 301-837-3540, FAX: 301-837-3620, EMAIL: mopix@nara.gov
Production Date: ca. 1942
Part of: Series: Motion Picture Films Relating to the Ford Motor Company, the Henry Ford Family, Noted Personalities, Industry, and Numerous Americana and Other Subjects, ca. 1903 - ca. 1954
Access Restrictions:
Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Restricted - Possibly
Copyright
All rights were conveyed to the U.S. Government on Nov. 28, 1962. However, proprietary rights or existing copyright in footage obtained from other sources by Ford Motor Company may exist.
Specific Records Type:
motion pictures (visual works)
Variant Control Number(s):
NAIL Control Number: NWDNM(m)-200-FC-2602(b)
Local Identifier: NWDNM(m)-FC-FC-2602(b)
NAIL Control Number: NWDNM(m)-FC-FC-2602(b)
Copy 1
Copy Status: Preservation
Storage Facility: National Archives at College Park - Archives II (College Park, MD)
Media
Media Type: Film Reel
Reel/Tape/Disc #: 1
Black-and-White, Film: 35 mm, Film: MPS, 411 feet
Copy 2
Copy Status: Reproduction
Storage Facility: National Archives at College Park - Archives II (College Park, MD)
Media
Media Type: Film Reel
Reel/Tape/Disc #: 1
Black-and-White, Film: 35 mm, Film: DNS, 441 feet
Copy 3
Copy Status: Reference
Storage Facility: National Archives at College Park - Archives II (College Park, MD)
Media
Media Type: Film Reel
Reel/Tape/Disc #: 1
Black-and-White, Film: 35 mm, Film: PPS, 420 feet
Copy 4
Copy Status: Reference
Storage Facility: National Archives at College Park - Archives II (College Park, MD)
Media
Media Type: Video Cassette
Reel/Tape/Disc #: 1
3/4 inch, Video: U-matic

Lifecycle Tracking Information

Former Record Group:
200, National Archives Gift Collection
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Old August 4th, 2006, 01:39 PM   #10
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Hey Mark,
Thanks so much for the info! Yea, I pretty much understand that. Thanks. I guess my last question is....do the U-Matic decks have an S-video out? I guess that would either be the last step of getting decent quality before actually hiring a vendor.
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Old August 4th, 2006, 03:12 PM   #11
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No S-Video connections available. I used male BNC to female RCA video adapter (Phono-to-BNC adapter). At RadioShack you can get one for a couple of bucks. Also, you probably want an audio splitter (shielded Y-adapter audio cable). Audio is RCA to mini-din if I remember correctly.

There is a RadioShack not very far from the archives...

Mark



http://www.archives.gov/research/for...ture-room.html

-- quote --

Non-Restricted Video Material Viewing/Listening Stations

At these stations you can view and listen to non-restricted videotaped material and use your own equipment to record copies. There are 34 stations for viewing/listening to videotaped material in 3/4-inch (U-Matic) or 1/2-inch VHS/S-VHS formats.

For those who wish to dub copies, the station video output requires a BNC male connector on your video cable. The station audio output requires an RCA male phone plug on your audio cable. The audio signal is hi-fi monaural. There is only one audio output jack so if you desire audio on two tracks (such as the left and right tracks on a stereo recorder) you will need a signal splitter to divide the signal. There is a BNC jack for an input video feed from your copy equipment to the monitor. When dubbing 3/4-inch videotape to Betacam you may need a time base corrector. The viewing/listening stations are located in the aisle along the balcony railing and at the rear of the room.
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Old August 4th, 2006, 11:24 PM   #12
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I find that Radio Shack is more into selling consumer electronics than electronics electronics now... in Canada, you can't buy capacitors or resistors there. I don't think you can buy a radio kit either. *In Canada, they rebranded to something else.

So they may not have that particular adapter in stock.

2- I would check availability for stuff online. Or call them up.
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Old August 4th, 2006, 11:59 PM   #13
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My experience with RS these days is you will need to know what you're looking for and whether it's in stock at local stores before you go there to get something. Check the web to make sure it's available then call the store to make sure they have it in stock. If you have the part number then can check it on the computer. You may end up going from store to store if you don't check. It is not the same RS I knew from 15 years ago.
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