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Old July 17th, 2005, 07:27 PM   #1
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Job of a Video Editor??

I really needed someone to ask so hopefully someone here could help me out or redirect me to someone!

I am really thinking of getting into Video Editing when I leave school and I have a couple of questions.

1. What type of companies will look to employ you??

2. Do you need a college/University degree??

3. Is there much work available for a Video Editor??

4. Whats the average price range that a Video Editor will make.

5. Am I right in calling it Video Editing....is there a more proper name for it?

Thanks so much for your time

Scott
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Old July 18th, 2005, 01:13 AM   #2
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Hey Scott,

Good questions. I am a videographer who will send your post to my best friend, who happens to be the best editor I know. I hope she will have the time to address your questions. Please be patient for a reply, as she's super busy.

Much good fortune to you in the future,

Stephanie
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Old July 18th, 2005, 04:31 AM   #3
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Hey Stephanie,

Thanks so much for your input and help! I really appreciate it.
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Old July 19th, 2005, 02:43 PM   #4
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Hey Scott,

My editor friend got back to me with her answers to your questions.

Hope they help. Great day to you.

Answers:

*

3. -Yes, lots of work always as a video editor. Lots of products always need to be assembled.

*

2. - No, you don't need a degree. It's based on how proficient you are on the equipment. That is....the edit system that a particular client may be using. Which means that a good video editor is proficient on a variety of linear and non-linear systems. But, if you just want to get good on one system that may work out if you stay with one production source.

*

1. - Any company or production with video products utilize video editors: schools-administrations; corporations with sales videos; research companies who document on video;*foundations-organizations-families-companies*that need video presentations for special events and; anything that gets to television, cable or the movie theatre has a studio-network-production company creating that product and they utilize a team of editors.

*

4. - You can start anywhere from $10 to $15 per hour. The more experience and skills you obtain you increase your rate! Avid editors start at $40 per hour. Many seasoned editors are making between $45 to $60 per hour.

*

5.- Video editor is a good term. If you edit film, primarily, then you would refer to yourself as a film editor....even if you are cutting on an avid and utilizing video transfers.
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Old July 19th, 2005, 11:40 PM   #5
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Oh good as gold!!!

Give your friend my thanks and also thanks alot to you for your help!
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Old July 19th, 2005, 11:57 PM   #6
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Thank you Scott for your gracious reply. My friend will be so happy that she helped someone.

We both wish you many blessings in the future.

Stephanie
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Old July 20th, 2005, 12:18 AM   #7
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Quote:
4. - You can start anywhere from $10 to $15 per hour. The more experience and skills you obtain you increase your rate! Avid editors start at $40 per hour. Many seasoned editors are making between $45 to $60 per hour.
I'm curious: Is the $45 to $60/hr rate for freelance or salary work?
It's hard to compare the two, but freelance rates need to be higher than salary rates to be equivalent (freelance income is unsteady, you have unbillable hours, you need to do own tax, no benefits, etc.).
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Old July 20th, 2005, 01:11 PM   #8
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Hey Glen,

I'm forwarding your question to my editor friend. Hopefully I can post an answer by this afternoon.

Stephanie
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Old July 21st, 2005, 01:41 AM   #9
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Hey Glenn,
I also don't know about Canada, but the rates can be different from these LA editor are use to.

Just my 3 cents.
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Old August 10th, 2005, 03:10 PM   #10
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How to get started professionally?

This thread has been helpful. Thanks to all who've contributed so far.

WARNING: This is a long post.

My question is, how does one get started? I've been shooting weddings part time for two years, and I want to edit more than weddings, but I'm not sure how to make the career change from book editor to video editor. Based on information from videographers I know who make corporate and commercial productions, prospective employers don't want a demo reel of weddings.

I'm in my early 30s and have a bachelor's degree in English, so I don't have a journalism background or internship to inch me toward a TV news job. I did, however, take elective courses in public relations, newswriting, and photography (not video -- I'm self taught in that discipline). Videography started out as a hobby, but I've been investing time and money to take it to the next level in hopes of eventually earning a living doing something I enjoy (and think I'm pretty good at doing). I know I can be doing more, so here's my plan. Tell me if you think it's worth doing:

Step 1 -- Produce a few projects at cost. I'm approaching owners of small businesses and bands I know and offering to produce their TV commercials, web promos, any video they want at cost. Because I'm a member of a local wedding professionals' group, I think local florists, bridal store owners, DJs, photogs, and other wedding vendors will be good prospects. I know may small business owners, but most of them don't have the budget for TV advertising even if I make their spot for free. Unfortunately, I'm not active in a church at this time, so I don't have that connection to work.

Step 2 -- Create the demo. I've ready plenty about creating an effective demo. I just need a body of non-wedding work to showcase in it.

Step 3 -- Through networking, get that demo and resume to studios and post houses, follow up, and hope for the best.

The video production market in my area is small. I know of about 20 shops in my part of the state, but many are small home-based shops. A few others are full-service firms that work with clients from concept to creation. In general, all are small companies of less than 10 employees. Most of the companies make TV commercials, PSAs, and some documentaries. Some of these companies are hired out as crews to networks like the History Channel, Discovery, MSNBC, CNN, you name it. A few shoot wedding videos as well. Larger, more established companies own their own fully lit production studios, while the small companies rent studio space for studio shoots.

If commercial and broadcast work is ultimately what I want to do, should I stop promoting my wedding business? I think not, because I can use those earnings to acquire gear for freelance work. For example, I'd like to buy an anamorphic lens for my DVC80. Which takes me to my final question: Should I have a preference when it comes to shooting video or editing video?
I was asked that question during a job interview once, and it caught me off guard.

Thanks, and sorry for the really long post.

T.J.
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Old August 10th, 2005, 03:21 PM   #11
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TJ,


Don't quit the day job.

Seriously, keep the wedding business gowing, and let your 'editing' work put you out of business.

Your plan is a realistic one. Expand your skills and hone your chops with music videos, corporate clients and 'narrative shorts' - all at cost or low cost to get the work. Build your reel, send it out, network, rinse and repeat.

Decide if you want to work FOR someone else on their gear (IE: a post house or ad agency) or build your business as a freelancer with 'studio' for hire. If Editing full time is your hearts desire, your location might not support it. (Sounds like there are plenty of free-lancers in the area, cutting up a relatively small pie).

Good luck
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